Hands-on: unboxing the edelkrone Wing 7

I received an edelkrone Wing 7 to test a few days ago. Unboxing it, I was in for a surprise. It’s bigger and heavier than I thought. It is also a fantastic piece of engineering. The promise of “perfect slides, no rails” from the edelkrone Wing presented by ProVideo Coalition last August extended to three The post Hands-on: unboxing the edelkrone Wing 7 appeared first on ProVideo Coalition.

How to Shoot ‘Frozen’ Action Sports Athletes in a Photo Studio

For his recent project titled Frozen, photographer Denis Klero shot creative studio portraits of action sports athletes in a way that makes them look like they’re frozen in ice. Much of the snow look was created using many cans of Sno Blower, an aerosol spray that costs about $11 for a 16-ounce can.

Behind the Scenes

Here are some behind-the-scenes views showing how the shots were done: ps_161030_frozen_0003 dk_161030_frozen_0013 dk_161031_frozen_0006 ps_161102_frozen_0001 ps_161102_frozen_0003 ps_161102_frozen_0006 dk_161102_frozen_0011 dk_161102_frozen_0008 ps_161112_frozen_0003 ps_161112_frozen_0005 ps_161112_frozen_0006 ps_161112_frozen_0007 dk_161112_frozen_0012

The Finished Photos

Here are the photos that resulted from all the work seen above: dk_161031_frozen_0001 dk_161102_frozen_0002 dk_161112_frozen_0003 “The literally coolest project of the year award goes to Denis Klero and his highly creative frozen action,” writes Red Bull Photography. “Jon Snow approved.” You can find more of Klero’s work on his website, Facebook, and Instagram. (via Red Bull Photography via ISO 1200)
Image credits: Photographs by Denis Klero and used with permission

A Photographer Dives Into Norway’s Underwater Atlantis

Lygnstolsvatnet Back in 1908, a landslide in Western Norway blocked off an entire valley, flooding the farmland and creating what’s now known as Lake Lygnstøylsvatnet. The lake is now a popular diving destination where people around the world come to explore Norway’s underwater Atlantis. Photographer Lars Korvald recently brought his underwater camera to the lake to shoot photos and video of the magical dive. “Imagine you are floating through crystal clear water, looking down at what looks to be an enchanted forest, the remains of a settlement over a hundred years old, and seeing the roads and the stone fences used to herd sheep and transport goods over a hundred years ago,” Korvald writes. Here’s an old photo showing some farms and a road prior to the rock slide:
Photo by Knud Knudsen Universitetsbiblioteket i Bergen
Photo by Knud Knudsen Universitetsbiblioteket i Bergen
And here’s a photo by Korvald showing some of the giant rocks that rolled into
Lygnstolsvatnet
The remaining foundation of an old farmhouse.
Not much is still standing from this old farmhouse.
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Lygnstolsvatnet
Lygnstolsvatnet
An underwater road.
Lygnstolsvatnet
Lygnstolsvatnet
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Lygnstolsvatnet
Continue reading "A Photographer Dives Into Norway’s Underwater Atlantis"

One hand, one second: Sleek, chic COSYSPEED Streetomatic+ camera bag is built around speed

                     



             




German company <a href="http://www.cosyspeed.com/" >COSYSPEED</a> wants you to carry your mirrorless or DSLR camera in style with their new <a href="http://www.cosyspeed.com/product/camslinger-streetomatic-plus/" >CAMSLINGER Streetomatic+ camera bag</a>, which they bill as &ldquo;the fastest camera bag in the world.&rdquo;

A roomier version of the original Streetomatic, the sleek Streetomatic+ can be worn at the hip or over your shoulder. What makes it fast is its one hand/one second design concept. The bag is opened using a magnetic closure designed and manufactured by German company FIDLOCK. You simply slide the buckle to the right, open the bag and then...
      <br /><a class="readMore" href='http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2016/12/10/one-hand-one-second-cosyspeed-streetomatic-camera-bag-is-built-around-speed'>(read more)</a>

A fresh look at Dorothea Lange’s censored photos of Japanese internment

Dorothea Lange's photos of Japanese interment in America are less well-known than her other Farm Security Administration works like 'Migrant Mother' - and there's a reason for that. The unflinching view of the events captured in her photos landed them in the US National Archive, with many labeled 'impounded,' where they sat for decades. Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, the US government announced the mandatory relocation of people of Japanese ancestry, the majority of which were American citizens, to internment camps. Lange was commissioned to photograph the events, both as people were displaced from homes and business, and later as they reported to assembly centers and were ultimately sent to the camps. Lange's photos painted a brutally honest picture of every phase of the internment, and were seemingly met with displeasure from the military as they were quietly impounded and archived. A 2006 book put the censored images front and center for the Continue reading "A fresh look at Dorothea Lange’s censored photos of Japanese internment"

A fresh look at Dorothea Lange’s censored photos of Japanese internment

Dorothea Lange's photos of Japanese interment in America are less well-known than her other Farm Security Administration works like 'Migrant Mother' - and there's a reason for that. The unflinching view of the events captured in her photos landed them in the US National Archive, with many labeled 'impounded,' where they sat for decades. Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, the US government announced the mandatory relocation of people of Japanese ancestry, the majority of which were American citizens, to internment camps. Lange was commissioned to photograph the events, both as people were displaced from homes and business, and later as they reported to assembly centers and were ultimately sent to the camps. Lange's photos painted a brutally honest picture of every phase of the internment, and were seemingly met with displeasure from the military as they were quietly impounded and archived. A 2006 book put the censored images front and center for the Continue reading "A fresh look at Dorothea Lange’s censored photos of Japanese internment"

A fresh look at Dorthea Lange’s censored photos of Japanese internment

Dorothea Lange's photos of Japanese interment in America are less well-known than her other Farm Security Administration works like 'Migrant Mother' - and there's a reason for that. The unflinching view of the events captured in her photos landed them in the US National Archive, with many labeled 'impounded,' where they sat for decades. Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, the US government announced the mandatory relocation of people of Japanese ancestry, the majority of which were American citizens, to internment camps. Lange was commissioned to photograph the events, both as people were displaced from homes and business, and later as they reported to assembly centers and were ultimately sent to the camps. Lange's photos painted a brutally honest picture of every phase of the internment, and were seemingly met with displeasure from the military as they were quietly impounded and archived. A 2006 book put the censored images front and center for the Continue reading "A fresh look at Dorthea Lange’s censored photos of Japanese internment"