GoPro Fusion & Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us how to shoot 360 video but then edit it as “normal” HD video in Final Cut Pro X. Since I was in Buenos Aires, Steve carries the show solo this time, extolling the virtues of his GoPro Fusion camera and how well it works with Final Cut Pro X. If you aren’t interested in 360, don’t stop reading or watching just yet! Steve makes a strong case for shooting 360 even when you aren’t delivering in 360. Because you get everthing in your shot, you can essentially direct Continue reading "GoPro Fusion & Final Cut Pro X"

Other New Features in Motion

This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training something new in Motion. When Final Cut Pro X was updated to 10.4 a few months back, it overshadowed Motion’s update to version 5.4, where it received a couple of new, interesting, and useful features. The biggest update was the addition of support for working with 360 video. These features mirror those added to Final Cut Pro, and allow you to use Motion to create 360 titles, transitions, and effects. You can see an example of how to create particle systems in 360 here. The other Continue reading "Other New Features in Motion"

Other New Features in Motion

This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training something new in Motion. When Final Cut Pro X was updated to 10.4 a few months back, it overshadowed Motion’s update to version 5.4, where it received a couple of new, interesting, and useful features. The biggest update was the addition of support for working with 360 video. These features mirror those added to Final Cut Pro, and allow you to use Motion to create 360 titles, transitions, and effects. You can see an example of how to create particle systems in 360 here. The other Continue reading "Other New Features in Motion"

Working with 360 Videos in Motion

This week on MacBreak Studio, I talk with Ripple Training’s Steve Martin about the 360 toolset in Motion. For years, you’ve been able to use Motion to create titles, transitions, and effects that you can then publish for use in Final Cut Pro X. As of version 5.4 (introduced at the same time as Final Cut Pro 10.4), you can now create 360 versions of any title, transition, or effect. To explore how to work with 360 in Motion, I start by creating a project directly from a 360 (equirectangular) video clip. Motion can tell it’s a 360 Continue reading "Working with 360 Videos in Motion"

Working with 360 Videos in Motion

This week on MacBreak Studio, I talk with Ripple Training’s Steve Martin about the 360 toolset in Motion. For years, you’ve been able to use Motion to create titles, transitions, and effects that you can then publish for use in Final Cut Pro X. As of version 5.4 (introduced at the same time as Final Cut Pro 10.4), you can now create 360 versions of any title, transition, or effect. To explore how to work with 360 in Motion, I start by creating a project directly from a 360 (equirectangular) video clip. Motion can tell it’s a 360 Continue reading "Working with 360 Videos in Motion"

Working in HDR with Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, I talk with Ripple Training’s Steve Martin about how to work with HDR video in Final Cut Pro X. High Dynamic Range video, or HDR, has been around for years but until recently there hasn’t been a way to maintain it during editing, distribution, and display. That’s because the Rec. 709 standard for HD and UHD video is limited to the same 100 nit maximum brightness level as good old SD video dating back decades. But cameras that can capture 12 to 14 stops of dynamic range and more are readily available, and consumer 4K Continue reading "Working in HDR with Final Cut Pro X"

Removing a Drone Shadow in Final Cut Pro X

Double trouble! This week on MacBreak Studio, Ripple Training’s Steve Martin returns and shows us a very cool trick for removing a shadow from a video clip. Specifically, he is working on a clip shot with a drone, and the drone’s shadow is clearly visible in the shot. Now, there are some convoluted ways you can hide the shadow by copying the clip on top of itself, then masking and offsetting the area of the shadow. And there are third party tools, including our own Ripple Tools Complete, that include a cloner tool. But Steve decided to try using the Continue reading "Removing a Drone Shadow in Final Cut Pro X"

Working with 360 Effects in Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, Ripple Training’s Steve Martin shows us how to apply effects to 360 videos in Final Cut Pro X. When shooting in 360, it’s even more likely that you’ll include something that shouldn’t be in the shot. That’s of course because not only are you capturing everything around you; – you often need to hide so you aren’t in the shot. So it can be easy to miss things: perhaps a logo on a t-shirt, or the face of someone from whom you didn’t get a release. In Steve’s example, he has a shot of folks Continue reading "Working with 360 Effects in Final Cut Pro X"

Editor as Director in 360 Video with Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, Ripple Training’s Steve Martin shows us how the editor can be the director when it comes to working with 360 video in Final Cut Pro X. 360 video gives the audience the opportunity to look in any direction by either dragging in a magic window in a browser or moving their head around when viewing through a phone, tablet, or headset like Google Cardboard or perhaps an HTC Vive. It’s an opportunity, but it also poses a challenge for the filmmaker who usually wants viewers to look in a specific direction. The viewer is limited Continue reading "Editor as Director in 360 Video with Final Cut Pro X"

Creating Custom Black & White Effects in Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Ripple Training’s Steve Martin how you can use the new color tools in Final Cut Pro 10.4 to create custom greyscale and tint effects. If you apply a Color Curves correction to a clip and then attempt to isolate a specific \ red, blue, or green channel by pulling down on the upper right control point the other channels to remove them completely, you’ll notice in the RGB parade that those channels don’t get completely removed. This is because the Preserve Luma checkbox at the bottom of the correction window is enabled Continue reading "Creating Custom Black & White Effects in Final Cut Pro X"

From the Field to Final Cut

This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training explains how he uses his iPad Pro to start editing in the field, then back in the edit suite easily moves his project to Final Cut Pro X in order to continue working. New in version 10.4 of Final Cut Pro is the ability to directly import iMovie iOS projects. While this process works with a regular iPad, iPad mini, or even an iPhone, Steve likes editing on the iPad Pro because of its large screen size and the fact that he can use a stylus. After shooting, to Continue reading "From the Field to Final Cut"

Working with Camera LUTs and Creative LUTs in Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, I talk with Steve Martin from Ripple Training about how to work with Camera LUTs and Creative LUTs in Final Cut Pro X. In version 10.4 released last December, Final Cut Pro changed how it works with LUTs. It now distinguishes between two kinds of LUTs that are each applied in a different manner: Camera LUTs and Creative LUTs. Camera LUTs are Look Up Tables supplied by each camera manufacturer and are designed specifically to display a particular camera’s LOG footage in the target delivery color space: either Rec. 709 or Rec. 2020. Camera Continue reading "Working with Camera LUTs and Creative LUTs in Final Cut Pro X"

Removing People from 360 Videos in Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us how to remove a person from a 360 video in Final Cut Pro X. In normal interview situations, we see a subject being interviewed, usually looking off-camera at the person conducting the interviewer. We may not see the interviewer at all; we may see them as an over-the-shoulder (OTS) shot; or there may be a second camera pointed at the interviewer and it’s used in the edit. But with 360 video, there’s no editing between shots, and there’s no hiding the interviewer, since the viewer can look around Continue reading "Removing People from 360 Videos in Final Cut Pro X"

Awesome Hue Sampling in Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training the differences between color sampling with color masks and hue curves in Final Cut Pro X. The 10.4 update to Final Cut Pro added advanced grading tools including color wheels, color curves, and hue/saturation curves. With these new tools, it’s now possible to create (among other things) better selections for secondary color corrections. So when should you use a color mask vs. sampling a hue? After all, the color mask is available for all correction types, gives you direct feedback in the Viewer you when make a Continue reading "Awesome Hue Sampling in Final Cut Pro X"

Creating Color Contrast Looks in Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training how to use the extensive new color correction features in Final Cut Pro 10.4 to achieve the popular “orange and teal” look. To get there, we employ each of the new color correction types including Wheels, Curves, and Hue/Sat Curves. The look we are going for is based on the idea of increasing color contrast: as opposed to luminance contrast, or dynamic range, which defines the spread of light and dark values across an image, color contrast defines the spread of color values in an image based Continue reading "Creating Color Contrast Looks in Final Cut Pro X"

Creating a Pleasantville Effect in Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, I show Steve Martin from Ripple Training how to use Final Cut Pro X’s color correction tools to isolate a color in a shot. Frequently referred to as the “Pleasantville Effect” due to its use in the 1998 movie, it employs splashes of color in an otherwise black and white scene. To accomplish this effect in Final Cut Pro X, starting with a full color shot, you can use the Color Mask eyedropper tool to select the color you want to retain. Dragging the eyedropper expands the range of hue/saturation/brightness that gets included in Continue reading "Creating a Pleasantville Effect in Final Cut Pro X"

Creating Moveable Markers in Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training continues he discussion about markers in Final Cut Pro X by showing us a way to make markers moveable. If you missed last week’s episode on turning frame.io comments into markers in FCP X, you may want to check that out here. This week focuses on moving chapter markers in Final Cut Pro X. Steve starts by demonstrating the normal workflow for creating chapter markers: navigating to the frame where he wants the marker, pressing the “m” twice in quick succession to both add the marker and open the Continue reading "Creating Moveable Markers in Final Cut Pro X"

Creating Chapter Markers in Final Cut Pro X with Frame.io

  This week on MacBreak Studio, Steve Martin from Ripple Training shows us how you can use frame.io to add chapter markers for Final Cut Pro X. Frame.io is a feature-rich and flexible video review platform. If you missed our episode on how to use it to export your project as separate clips, check it out here. We use Frame.io extensively in our tutorial editing process. Editors post drafts and authors review the drafts, adding notes – not only for fixes, but also for identifying chapter marker locations and titles. Previously, the editor had to manually add Continue reading "Creating Chapter Markers in Final Cut Pro X with Frame.io"

Incredible Shrinking Libraries in Final Cut Pro X

This week on MacBreak Studio, we celebrate our 400th episode! Besides the silliness (which we hope you enjoy), Steve Martin from Ripple Training gives us a very interesting media management tip for Final Cut Pro X. The scenario is one in which you imported your media into a library from a connected drive, but then you realize you didn’t want to do that. Newly created libraries default to “managed” libraries, or ones in which the media is copied inside the library. If you don’t change that setting in the Library Inspector before importing, then naturally all imported media will be Continue reading "Incredible Shrinking Libraries in Final Cut Pro X"