Personal Projects: Kent Miller

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this new revised thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions. Today’s featured artist: Kent Miller It’s the lost processes of photography – old film, large format view cameras – that enticed Photographer Kent Miller to start this current and ongoing project. He returned to his roots and found new inspiration in the old ways of working. His commercial work began over 25 years ago before the digital rage, so shooting film again feels like returning to an old friend. Using black and white film, some dating to the early 1900’s, has caused him to adjust how he shoots, to slow down the way he makes images. This project involves finding old film, then producing images of friends, artists, creators, and everyday people who move in and out of his life. After exposing the film, he develops and scans it. When the series is completed, his plan is to print each image by hand, the old school way, in a darkroom.

Jamie McCarthy photographed in Westchester, NY for creators project. Photograph was made using a Linhof 5×7 large format camera with Ilford FP4. Developed in D76 for 8.5 min. ISO-3, F6.8 @ 1 second

To see more of this project, click here. APE contributor Suzanne Sease currently works as a consultant for photographers Continue reading "Personal Projects: Kent Miller"

The Daily Edit – Spencer Lowell: The New York Times Magazine

The New York Times Magazine

Design Director: Gail Bichler
Art Director: Michael Willey
Deputy Art Director: Ben Grandgenett
Photographer Director: Kathy Ryan
Associate Photo Editors: Amy Kellner, Christine Walsh, Stacey Baker
Photographer: Spencer Lowell

Heidi: How difficult was it to get to the location considering how remote the seed vault was?
Spencer: The seed vault actually isn’t that remote once you get to the town of Longyearbyen, which is only a couple of connecting flights from LA. You can actually see the vault from the airport up in the mountainside. It has to be accessible because it’s opened up a few times a year for deposits to be made. The biggest difficulty was dealing with the -20 degree temperatures once I was actually at the vault.

What was your security clearance process for the vault?
After some googling, I emailed the press department at the Norwegian Ministry of Agriculture and Food and told them I was working on a project for the New York Times and wanted to photograph the vault. They wrote me back saying the vault was actually going to be open the following week for a deposit and let me know I was more than welcome to come. I booked my travel and was there the next week. I assume they looked at my website but besides that, there was no security clearance.

Did you have to wear protective gear considering how precious the subject matter was? (for the seeds and the frogs).
For the shoot at the seed bank, I was wearing an obscene amount of layers because of how cold it was so no additional protection was needed. I could bare my hands being out of my gloves for a few seconds if I needed to change my camera and light settings but all the Continue reading "The Daily Edit – Spencer Lowell: The New York Times Magazine"

The Daily Edit – Spencer Lowell: The New York Times Magazine

The New York Times Magazine

Design Director: Gail Bichler
Art Director: Michael Willey
Deputy Art Director: Ben Grandgenett
Photographer Director: Kathy Ryan
Associate Photo Editors: Amy Kellner, Christine Walsh, Stacey Baker
Photographer: Spencer Lowell

Heidi: How difficult was it to get to the location considering how remote the seed vault was?
Spencer: The seed vault actually isn’t that remote once you get to the town of Longyearbyen, which is only a couple of connecting flights from LA. You can actually see the vault from the airport up in the mountainside. It has to be accessible because it’s opened up a few times a year for deposits to be made. The biggest difficulty was dealing with the -20 degree temperatures once I was actually at the vault.

What was your security clearance process for the vault?
After some googling, I emailed the press department at the Norwegian Ministry of Agriculture and Food and told them I was working on a project for the New York Times and wanted to photograph the vault. They wrote me back saying the vault was actually going to be open the following week for a deposit and let me know I was more than welcome to come. I booked my travel and was there the next week. I assume they looked at my website but besides that, there was no security clearance.

Did you have to wear protective gear considering how precious the subject matter was? (for the seeds and the frogs).
For the shoot at the seed bank, I was wearing an obscene amount of layers because of how cold it was so no additional protection was needed. I could bare my hands being out of my gloves for a few seconds if I needed to change my camera and light settings but all the Continue reading "The Daily Edit – Spencer Lowell: The New York Times Magazine"

The Daily Promo – Victoria Ling

   

Victoria Ling

Who printed it?
Park communication

Who designed it?
I did.

Who edited the images?
Siobhan Squire and myself.

How many did you make?
1200.

How many times a year do you send out promos?
Every six months or so.

 
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This Week in Photography Books: Henry Wessel

    I’ve been to Southern California at least twenty times in my life, and I’ve always had a car. Every. Single. Time. You’ve got to have a car in Southern California.
(Or so I thought.) Back in May, a friend told me she’d just gotten around LA using ride-sharing services, which for some reason are insanely cheap at the moment. (Much less expensive than taxis.) She made me half-swear that I wouldn’t rent a car the next time I went to LA. So when I visited the city last week, I subsisted on cabs and Ubers alone, even though I wasn’t able to download Lyft or Uber on my phone the day before I left. (Long and boring story. I’ll spare you.) I must say, not having immediate access to go where I wanted, when I wanted, was a seriously uncomfortable feeling. It’s no surprise that cars are symbolically associated with freedom. I guess if I had a new Iphone, and my own ride-sharing app, that feeling might have abated, but I’m not so sure. As one who’s lived in the American West for a chunk of my life, I know that things only work at car distances. Otherwise, the cities and towns dotted from the Rockies to the Coast would never truly be connected. Cars are almost like water out here, in how necessary they are for survival. We all crave the revelatory feeling of being on the open road somewhere, with your favorite music blasting. The yearning for discovery and adventure is hardwired into the human experience. It’s the opposite feeling, in every way, to being stuck in traffic, staring at the same cars for an hour, while you inch along a concrete ribbon, and you could probably walk faster if you really tried.
Continue reading "This Week in Photography Books: Henry Wessel"

Personal Projects: Kris Connor

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this new revised thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions. Today’s featured artist: Kris Connor As I move throughout this world of ours, I wonder at times..how would I have seen and lived in this world if I hadn’t gone through limb lengthening as a child?.  Where “Dawson,” gave the viewer a glimpse into what it’s like to go through limb lengthening for Dawson. ”What Difference a Foot Makes,” answers that question for myself and to give a viewer two different perceptions of the same world. One through my eyes at being a 5’2 person and how I would have seen the same world at 4”3. I was born with achondroplasia, which is the most common of the 200 plus types of dwarfisms. Most people who have the condition average around an adult height of four feet, my predicted height was going to be 4”3 without any additional operations. At ten years old, I made the decision to go through my first limb lengthening operation. Over the next five years I would go through a total of three operations on my upper and lower legs to gain 12 inches and one operation to gain four inches on my arms. The operation started in Russia in the 1950s by Doctor Vetlana Ilizarov. It’s an
Continue reading "Personal Projects: Kris Connor"

Pricing & Negotiating: Stock Licensing

Jess Dudley, Wonderful Machine Licensing: Web Collateral use of up to three images for two years Photographer: Southeast-based portrait specialist Agency: N/A – Client Direct Client: The philanthropic arm of a recognizable consumer brand Here is the estimate: A seasoned portrait photographer came to us looking for assistance pricing a stock licensing agreement for a large corporation interested in using three existing images on the “.org” website of their philanthropic division. The shoot had originally been commissioned by an editorial client for a piece about the subject’s philanthropic endeavors and organizations, so before determining the value, we first had to review the original commissioning agreement to ensure the photographer had the ability/permission to license the images to a third party. Even the most favorable editorial agreements typically include an embargo period which may prevent one from licensing content for a reasonable period of time after publishing and some of the least favorable editorial agreements restrict licensing in more substantial ways. As it happened, these images were available to license, so on we went. The difficulty with determining the value of any licensing, as it is all so subjective and project specific, is figuring out an anchor price from which to adjust, based on the various contributing factors. At Wonderful Machine, we use a tried-and-true benchmark that sets the baseline cost for collateral use (“Collateral” use is when the work appears in or on a platform that the client wholly controls and produces, such as a company website, annual report, brochure, or social media profile, and is intended to promote a commercial product, service, personality or brand) of one image, for one year, at around $1000, and additional images licensed for concurrent use should be worth about 50% as much as the first image. We also use a pricing model that assumes a doubling Continue reading "Pricing & Negotiating: Stock Licensing"

Pricing & Negotiating: Stock Licensing

Jess Dudley, Wonderful Machine Licensing: Web Collateral use of up to three images for two years Photographer: Southeast-based portrait specialist Agency: N/A – Client Direct Client: The philanthropic arm of a recognizable consumer brand Here is the estimate: A seasoned portrait photographer came to us looking for assistance pricing a stock licensing agreement for a large corporation interested in using three existing images on the “.org” website of their philanthropic division. The shoot had originally been commissioned by an editorial client for a piece about the subject’s philanthropic endeavors and organizations, so before determining the value, we first had to review the original commissioning agreement to ensure the photographer had the ability/permission to license the images to a third party. Even the most favorable editorial agreements typically include an embargo period which may prevent one from licensing content for a reasonable period of time after publishing and some of the least favorable editorial agreements restrict licensing in more substantial ways. As it happened, these images were available to license, so on we went. The difficulty with determining the value of any licensing, as it is all so subjective and project specific, is figuring out an anchor price from which to adjust, based on the various contributing factors. At Wonderful Machine, we use a tried-and-true benchmark that sets the baseline cost for collateral use (“Collateral” use is when the work appears in or on a platform that the client wholly controls and produces, such as a company website, annual report, brochure, or social media profile, and is intended to promote a commercial product, service, personality or brand) of one image, for one year, at around $1000, and additional images licensed for concurrent use should be worth about 50% as much as the first image. We also use a pricing model that assumes a doubling Continue reading "Pricing & Negotiating: Stock Licensing"

The Daily Edit – Maggie B. Kennedy: Garden&Gun


 Garden&Gun


Design Director: Marshall McKinney
Photography Director: Maggie B. Kennedy
Associate Photo Editor: Margaret Houston

Heidi: You came from the commercial side of photography as a creative director at Williams-Sonoma, Inc. in San Francisco. What surprised you about editorial photography now that your 11 years in the game?
Maggie: I think working on both the commercial and editorial sides of the photo industry has proved beneficial. I had the opportunity to work with so many talented photographers, stylists, art directors, creatives, etc. during my decade with Williams-Sonoma years as well as be exposed to the various company departments and business overall. How a photograph of a beautiful table setting or friends cooking together sets the tone of a brand. So much is thought about before the actual photograph is taken. Many of the photographers I was fortunate enough to work with at Williams-Sonoma shot both commercial and editorial projects. I think that time marked the beginning of the advertising/commercial world starting to explore a more editorial/lifestyle approach you see in campaigns today. I think the two worlds continue to weave together to keep up with new business models, whether for a retail company, a magazine, any business now. It’s all about creating a larger brand, a lifestyle. When you left San Francisco, what did most of your peers say about your moving to a start-up?
I continued to work with Williams-Sonoma for a few years after relocating to Charleston, SC (Garden & Gun magazine’s hometown). A lot of the photographers and creatives I worked with for so many years in San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, etc. thought I had lost my mind moving back to the South!! (I’m originally from North Carolina.) I, too, questioned my decision those first months after landing in Charleston but was ready
Continue reading "The Daily Edit – Maggie B. Kennedy: Garden&Gun"

The Daily Promo – Embry Rucker

Embry Rucker

Who printed it?
These were printed & mailed by Modern Postcard – They are great. I printed my very first postcard with them in 1997 ish. It was a sunset silhouette of Stonehenge, wish I knew where that slide was.

Who designed it? 
Designed & laid out by my good friend & talented artist Dustin Ortiz dustinortiz.com We have worked together on a few projects now & he always has a great new eye on things.

Who edited the images?
Dustin & I worked on that together. I usually have a batch that I think ‘work together’ & he helps establish a priority or hierarchy. For example, having Tony’s face so big on the promo was his call, I would have been maybe a little leery of that because its… so big. But, fuck it, its a great shot of a cool looking dude – sometimes you just need someone to tell you that ‘yeah, that’s rad, run it big’.

How many did you make?
Around 2000, Mailed 1500 ish & picked the remainder up locally at Modern Postcard for hand written notes, leave behinds & a bunch for my reps.

How many times a year do you send out promos?
2-3 times a year ideally, but, I always have ambitions of doing more than I actually send out.

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The Daily Promo – Embry Rucker

Embry Rucker

Who printed it?
These were printed & mailed by Modern Postcard – They are great. I printed my very first postcard with them in 1997 ish. It was a sunset silhouette of Stonehenge, wish I knew where that slide was.

Who designed it? 
Designed & laid out by my good friend & talented artist Dustin Ortiz dustinortiz.com We have worked together on a few projects now & he always has a great new eye on things.

Who edited the images?
Dustin & I worked on that together. I usually have a batch that I think ‘work together’ & he helps establish a priority or hierarchy. For example, having Tony’s face so big on the promo was his call, I would have been maybe a little leery of that because its… so big. But, fuck it, its a great shot of a cool looking dude – sometimes you just need someone to tell you that ‘yeah, that’s rad, run it big’.

How many did you make?
Around 2000, Mailed 1500 ish & picked the remainder up locally at Modern Postcard for hand written notes, leave behinds & a bunch for my reps.

How many times a year do you send out promos?
2-3 times a year ideally, but, I always have ambitions of doing more than I actually send out.

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The Daily Promo – Ryan Anderson

Eric Ryan Anderson


Who printed it?
We worked with Chris Young at Prolific Group, wonderful experience.

Who designed it?
My friend Kayla Kern who does all kinds of amazing things.

Who edited the images? This promo all started with the harness racer image. I knew I wanted to print it large, and once we decided on a poster, Kayla helped me choose from a few options that made sense on the back. We chose the Tracksmith (shirt over head) image to lie under the mailing label since it was a bit more intriguing.

How many did you make? We printed 1000 of these and sent them out to a list of creatives and agencies who have a hand in the activewear/sports markets. I’ll usually hold on to 50-100 to use as leave-behinds for meetings and such.

How many times a year do you send out promos? Usually only think about it once we have a slow week or two and start questioning our existence : ) Jokes aside, I’ll send a print piece usually once or twice a year. I generally like doing things that have a design element and that I’d enjoy receiving in the mail (zines, newsprint, posters) and hope that there are others who enjoy the same thing out there!

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This Week in Photography Books: Raphael Shammaa

  It’s the middle of July, which means many of you are on vacation. Yes, it’s holiday time again. No doubt about it. I’m not getting to beach myself, this summer, so if you’re reading this on your Iphone, in between dips in the blue water somewhere… I hate you. (Just kidding.) I don’t hate you. What kind of writer would hate his audience? That’s insane. Rather, I’m going to do you a solid. I won’t make you read 700 words today before I get to the book review. Not today. I’ll keep it short, and show more pictures at the end to make up for it. Think of it as my way of saving you a few extra brain cells, while you recharge your batteries. You’ll need the help, as I’m off to Los Angeles tomorrow for portfolio reviews put on by the LA Center of Photography. I’ll have lots of fresh work to show you in the coming weeks, so today you get a reprieve. Surprisingly, this week’s book comes right out of yesterday’s mail. It never even made it into the pile. It’s a slim volume from Raphael Shammaa called “The Simplicity of the Moment.” (I believe it’s self-published.) I don’t know anything about the artist, (beyond the fact that he has a great name,) and the book doesn’t have much to say either. There’s a short statement indicating the pictures were taken in various locations, and that he’s going for simplicity and truth. Mostly, the words were vague because these are very visual pictures. They’ve got structure and sharpness, which are characteristics that will often get you reviewed in this space. And the printing quality is very high. Frankly, I just like this little book. Though I’m as happy to dig deep as
Continue reading "This Week in Photography Books: Raphael Shammaa"

Personal Projects: Eric Meola

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this new revised thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions. Today’s featured artist: Eric Meola Storm Chaser  I began photographing tornadoes and storms out in the heartland of America several years ago. As springtime approaches, I become the empty, eerie landscapes of the states that form tornado alley: Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, the Dakotas, Wyoming, Montana, Texas and Colorado and New Mexico. I like to look at clouds, I love to photograph them—this is where I can be a kid forever. I’m reminded of the Minor White quote, “A photographer is someone who has his head in the clouds and his feet on the ground.”  The photography of storms and weather phenomena is, for me, an exploration of the ephemeral, the constantly changing shapes and movement of the atmosphere. My photographs are meant to capture the dichotomy between the fury of skies torn apart and the tranquil, lonely solitude of the Great Plains. My notebooks from chasing storms reflect the Buddhist-like state of meditation and peace I get from being out on the open prairie, simply looking at the sky: The sky unfolds in sheets of light, shedding its skin, changing texture like a torn sheet folding in upon itself. Undulating in luminous bands, the ghosts of the wind fade into each
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The Daily Edit – Jolie Wernette-Horn

Shahrukh Khan is Bollywood royalty and also on of the top paid actors in the world. Vogue India Celebrated his 50th birthday, photographed by Mazen Abusrour.

Mumbai native and International star, Freida Pinto sat for Bharat Sikka for Vogue India’s 6th anniversary.

The chemistry onset was undeniable with Bollywood it-couple, Deepika Padrone and boyfriend Ranveer Singh, shot by Tarun Vishwa.

Deepika Padukone is one of the reigning queens of Bollywood, shot by photographer Prasad Naik.

The Ambassador car is a classic Indian design. Shot on film by Vikram Kushwah.

This gallery of Indian designers and their black pieces was shot on film by Vikram Kushwah for Vogue India’s 6th anniversary issue.

 

Supermodel Pooja Mor sat for photographer Bharat Sikka in this stunning editorial paying sartorial homage to fashion of the Indian subcontinent, styled by fashion director Anaita Shroff Adajania.

Irani cafes in Mumbai are a dying breed. Travel photographer Hashim Badani teamed up with Vogue India stylist (and fiancee) Priyanka Kapadia for one of my favorite shoots of 2016.

Manish Malhotra is one of India’s top designers, here photographed with Bollywood ingenue Alia Bhatt photographed by Vikram Kushwah

Vogue India

Editor in Chief: Priya Tanna
Fashion Director: Anaita Shroff Adajania
Creative Director: Jolie Wernette-Horn
Senior Fashion Editor: Priyanka Kapadia
Fashion Bookings Editor: Divya Jagwani

Heidi: Prior to Vogue India, you had a strong background in fashion publications here in the US, how did your role as Creative Director different if at all in India?
Jolie: I find the position of art director or creative director is basically the same. While responsibilities will, of course, change from magazine to magazine, even in New York, the main idea is to create and maintain a visual voice for the magazine.

Does Vogue India produce all original content?
We produce about 85-90 percent Continue reading "The Daily Edit – Jolie Wernette-Horn"

The Daily Promo: Joe Toeno


Joe Toreno


Who printed it? 

Next day flyers. 
I’ve used them for my last few promos. I really like their matte paper stock and they’re pretty affordable. My goal with my printed promos is to try and keep the budget around $500-$700 for the entire thing including postage. 

Who designed it? 
I designed it myself which is why it’s so simple. Just a couple photos and my contact info.

Who edited the images? 
I edited the images.  With these printed promos, I try to highlight some commercial work as well as some personal work.  In this case the commercial photo was a portrait of Ice Cube that I shot for People magazine. The personal was a photo of a falcon I shot for an ongoing series of animal portraits. 

How many did you make?
 I made 500 which mainly goes to magazine editors and a few reps

How many times a year do you send out promos? 
I try to send out two printed promos a year in conjunction with a couple email promos. 

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Personal Projects: Sam Robinson

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this new revised thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions. Today’s featured artist: Sam Robinson ‘Out of Office’ Sam Robinson As a creative, email mailers are a widely used promotional tool to share work and reach a wider digital audience. Sam began sending a quarterly newsletter like this in early 2013, sharing new projects and things he had been up to as a photographer/director. It became a bit of fun in the studio when the Out Of Office replies started to come back and, mixed in amongst the more standard replies, were a few amusing messages. The autoreply email is typically skimmed over and probably not read past the initial subject line but what Sam discovered is that some people had taken this automatic process to turn it into something personal. So he collaborated with illustrator Charlie Phillips to create bespoke prints of the emails overlaid upon his photography. He then sent the physical print back to the unsuspecting sender creating a fun contrast to the digital thing it had triggered from. The response over the years has been amazing, with people sharing their prints across social media as well as people actually taking time to do something different with their auto replies themselves from seeing the project. To see more of this project, Continue reading "Personal Projects: Sam Robinson"

The Daily Promo – Nathan Perkel

 

Nathan Perkel


Who printed the zine?
Influence Graphics

Who designed it?
I did the layout with some design aid from Ryan Giese

Who edited the image?
Edited by me

How many zines did you make?
Edition of 50

Which of these two promos was more successful and why?
I am personally more attached to the zine because of the amount of work that went into it as well as the experience of shooting it. But the bags seemed to get more of an initial response from people as it was different than most of my promos. Ultimately, both projects yielded a good amount of response and interest in other work of mine

Who printed the bag?
4imprint

Who designed it?
Designed it myself.

Who edited the image?
Edited by me.

How many bags did you make?
100

How many times a year do you send out promos?
2 or 3 printed promos and seasonal email promos

What made you want to do the bags as well as the cards?
I wanted to do the bags as they are functional and offer an extra layer of promotion in the event that they are worn. Also, I hate that in New York, plastic bags are given out so freely. I hope that the bags I made will reduce even just a handful of plastic bags given by stores.

Who printed the cards?
The cards were self-designed and printed by Influence Graphics
I did 250 cards – 100 went with the bags and the extra 150  went out separate to additional photo editors and art buyers as well.

.

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This Week in Photography Books: Michael Larkey

  I’ll make you guys a promise. I’m not going to promote Antidote, my new photo retreat, here in the column each week. In fact, this will be the last time. I’m mentioning it now, as this week, we created a new Student/Educator Pass, for $499, which makes the event far-more-affordable for the next generation of photographers, and the under-paid professors who teach them. I’m sharing the news, because rather than simply big-upping my own efforts, I think it’s important to stay honest here, as I always have. If I can criticize others, I should have the stones to do it to myself as well. When it came time to create a price for Antidote, I didn’t give it much thought. I looked around at what some high end workshop places charge, and slotted in accordingly. But everything I know about the creative life in 2017 flies in the face of such thinking. No one’s handing money out these days, and everyone is hustling hard to make ends meet. Whether it’s buyouts at the NYT, or galleries closing all the time, we all know you have to work for whatever you get, and opportunities don’t grow on trees. I’m glad I realized my mistake, and am now making my event within reach of you guys, my readers, as well as students and teachers across the US. I should have done it before I launched, but I forgot to consider the most crucial of questions: could I, as an artist/writer/adjunct professor, afford to come to my own retreat? Now, I can answer that question more appropriately. Honestly, the only reason I started Antidote is because adjunct teaching pays so poorly. It is literally impossible to make a living doing it, and I say that having just spent a year teaching full
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Personal Projects: Brian Doben

The Art of the Personal Project is a crucial element to let potential buyers see how you think creatively on your own.  I am drawn to personal projects that have an interesting vision or that show something I have never seen before.  In this new revised thread, I’ll include a link to each personal project with the artist statement so you can see more of the project. Please note: This thread is not affiliated with any company; I’m just featuring projects that I find.  Please DO NOT send me your work.  I do not take submissions. Today’s featured artist: Brian Doben I started ‘At Work’ after 15 years as a commercial photographer. After all that time I remembered that I became a photographer not for money, fame, or travel, but to get out of my own life and start telling stories of others through portrait. Before ‘At Work’ I used to walk in with an armada, both in terms of crew and over thinking the scene, but the story was right in front of me, and the magic was two feet in front of me. I realized my job is to kind of sit back, see it, and then capture it. Now, I walk into the space where my subjects do their work and I let them talk first. And I find when I do that and I listen, and I don’t interrupt, there’s a trust that comes. We spend more time working than anything else, so what people choose to do with that time is precious. I went to the Natural History Museum in Los Angeles to photograph their Taxidermist not knowing he was going to walk us to the area of the exhibit with the family of three elephants. I have a family of three elephants tattooed on
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