The Most Amazing Thing About Photography Circa 2019


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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Bob Gary was right in saying that the "Complexification" post the other day "hit a nerve." I think so too.

The best thing I got out of the discussion was the "aside" in the Featured Comment by Dennis, who wrote:

I know plenty of people who have turned away from entry level cameras (ILC or fixed lens) in favor of their phones, but I think that's due to the ease of sharing photos taken with a phone.

As an aside, I truly believe that many people do not think that their phone is a 'good enough' camera (how many

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Followups and Updates: The Eloquence of Coincidence (OT)


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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• Yesterday's post made me realize that I am not giving my current food experiment a decent chance. I am cheating too much, so I don't get to find out if the WFPB plan actually makes you feel better. Thanks to John Gillooly for asking the question. I really need to redouble my commitment so that I get good data on it, with my statistically insignificant but personally very significant experimental sample of one.

One commenter said he eats nothing but meat and has never felt better. I should point out that it's really all about outcomes. "Keto" (ketosis) diets,

Gear
Baked potato

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Wednesday Open Mike: Diet Progress


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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[I didn't write an Open Mike—"the anything-goes, often off-topic editorial page of TOP"—last week, so I'm being indulgent with myself this week. I stuck it behind a page break in case you'd rather skip it.

On that heading, it's always wise to bear in mind that not every post here is for everybody. That's how I think of blogging as I write. Sometimes the posts are for 90% of all my readers, sometimes as few as 5%, and there are posts for every percentage in between. It's all good, though, because the 5% who like one post might be

Lentils

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Wednesday Open Mike: Diet Progress


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




[I didn't write an Open Mike—"the anything-goes, often off-topic editorial page of TOP"—last week, so I'm being indulgent with myself this week. I stuck it behind a page break in case you'd rather skip it.

On that heading, it's always wise to bear in mind that not every post here is for everybody. That's how I think of blogging as I write. Sometimes the posts are for 90% of all my readers, sometimes as few as 5%, and there are posts for every percentage in between. It's all good, though, because the 5% who like one post might be

Lentils

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Killing Themselves Softly With Complexification-Saturation


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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Just wanted to reiterate this. (I've said it before, here and there.) This is a renegade, outsider, beyond-the-pale, meta viewpoint, but…

…I still think the camera companies are killing themselves with complexity. It's easier to figure out a new computer than it is to figure out a new camera. A few mavens can do it; nobody will admit to not being able to do it; but here's what I think is happening: I think most buyers of high-end enthusiast-level interchangeable lens (IL) cameras bought one new wunder-toy a few years back that they never quite understood thoroughly, then they

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Real Options


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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Just musing here. Mulling over the comments about the Range Rover thing, how's this for a concept….

A.) you pay a healthy amount of money for a luxury car, maybe double what you'd pay for a similar mainstream non-luxury version of something similar, b.) you get presented with a list of options, and c.) tick as many boxes as you want, configure your car just the way you like…

…NO CHARGE.

That's having options!

I predict the first company to do this will make out like bandits. Kia could do it, maybe. As a differentiator. Or Genesis.

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Bruce Polin


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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Big congratulations to TOP reader Bruce Polin, whose work is being highlighted on the Lens blog of the New York Times.

Poli Jay and Missy

Bruce Polin, Jay and Missy, Prospect Park, 2018

The work consists of traditional 8×10 film (FP4 and HP5) environmental portraits that are both meditative and collaborative. I really enjoyed the portfolio, which is called "What's the Opposite of a Cellphone Photo?"

Have a look at Bruce's work!

Mike
(Thanks to Bruce)

P.S. By the way, the mysterious "boxy, old-fashioned Japanese mechanism that shot on plates [sic] of film 8 inches by 10

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When Ignorance Is Not Bliss (Annals of Automobilia) (OT)


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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This is off topic, but it’s funny.

Consider: The base model of Land Rover’s top-of-the-line Range Rover SUV costs $89,500.

The base model of Toyota’s RAV4 SUV costs $24,500.

However, the RAV4 comes standard with far more features than the 3.6X more expensive Range Rover.

To get the features of the Range Rover up to the standard of a RAV4, you have to spend half the price of a base RAV4 just on options.

So just to spell this out, after already spending ninety grand on a car, people who buy Range Rovers have to spend yet more just

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11×14" Print


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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Andrew wrote in the Comments: "Re 'Somewhere out in the barn I have a motion-blurred snapshot of John Gossage in the lovely garden-level dining room of Julie Pratt's mansion holding that print, the first one Robert Frank ever sold.' Dig it out and let's see it!"

I tried. I tromped out to the barn and lugged in several boxes of prints, but I didn't find the one I was looking for.

John Gossage-2

Here's another shot from the same NYC trip, though. John Gossage is standing in an art installation on the roof of a multi-floor gallery, which I

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Write On (Blog Notes)


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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I finally broke down, bit the bullet, unclenched the fist clinging to the wallet like grim death, and bought a new computer. I had the kind help of Ben Rosengart and Steve Rosenblum. I bought an Apple 3.0GHz i7 six-core Mac Mini with 16 GB of RAM and a 512GB SSD. It's not here yet.

I have a stack of envelopes sitting on my desk from readers who mailed donations recently, which is what paid for most of the new computer. The return addresses include J. Reid, Nicholas Hartmann, Robert J. Sliclen, R. Teasley, G. Andros, Andrew Morang, Mark

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Charlie Pratt’s Prints


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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I've told this story before I'm sure, but Lord knows where.

Many years ago, the photographer John Gossage helped organize a show of photographs by Charles Pratt at the Corcoran Gallery. Charlie, who had died of a heart attack at his gym four years earlier at the age of 50, had been the scion of a wealthy industrialist family. It turned out that John had other connections with the Pratt family, which included helping Charlie's widow Julie publish several books of Charlie's photography. Julie was an actress—I believe she acted using her maiden name, Julie Follansbee. She died at 88

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How Do You Add Info?


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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Malcolm Myers (among others) asked: "How does one add comments to a physical print? Do you perhaps copy a 9×6 print into Photoshop, add some comments below and then print on a 10×8 or A4? I'd be interested to learn how people do this."

In the old days with fiber base [sic] paper, it was easy—the verso (back) side of print paper had the same surface as ordinary writing paper and you just wrote on it with a fairly hard pencil, which didn't come off on the next print down and didn't fade or degrade over

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Index Prints


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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[…This follows on the previous post. —Ed.]

 

Here's a simple way to make sense of a sprawling, less-than-perfectly organized ongoing archive of photographs of the sort most of us have—and eventually help preserve your pictures at the same time.

First, buy three boxes.

You might need more than one set, but this will get the point across.

Drop front box

You really don't need anything fancier than this archival drop-front metal-edge box. But if you want to spend more, naturally you can.

Then, whenever you get a photograph that you think is unusually good, regardless of what you took it

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Picture Permanence


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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Back in the saddle this morning—I needed to take yesterday off for personal reasons.

I have a few more thoughts about "picture permanence" (PicP)—similar to "print permanence," except that not every picture has to be a print.

There seems to me a division in motives for PicP. And that is, do you want to keep your pictures safe and secure for your lifetime, or last beyond it?

I can see reasons for either choice.

Another consideration is whether we're talking personally or culturally. I tend to think "culturally"—that is, I'd like to see pictures in general—everyone's—stand a chance of survival

Lewisumbrella-2

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Follow-Up: Ronnie’s 1,000th


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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This is a lot of fun even if you’re the furthest thing from a fan. Doesn’t everyone enjoy seeing moments of exceptional triumph in any sport or game? Ronnie managed to reach the magic 1,000 mark in the winning frame of Players tournament. For those of you who don’t watch snooker, ordinarily the audience is not allowed to call out when the players are at the table. Far from the case at the end of this break, as you’ll see!

Fun.

Fittingly, I’m off for my regular weekly date playing pool with my friends at the Moose Lodge. Back later

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Print to Save


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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Don't press like. Don't press save. Press print. Print to save.

Someone named Missy Mwac is being discussed recently (although, as a recovering alcoholic and a confessed WFPB fanatic, I can't see how someone who eats bacon and loves vodka could be your guide to anything, much less the murky waters. That's murky living if you ask me).

But I digress, as I do. Suffice it to say that I love her recent article "The Lesson from Costco's Photo Lab," discovered via reader robert e via PetaPixel.

A quote:

I tell you true from the bottom of my

John D Collett-small

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Last Chance! Print Offer Ends Soon


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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Don't forget our current Ctein Fine Print Offer ends at 2:00 p.m. EST today. That's 11:00 a.m. on the West Coast, 8:00 p.m. in Paris, and 3:00 a.m. Sunday in Perth.

You readers in Perth don't really want to stay up that late, do you? So order now! (Links in the previous post.)

And thanks to everyone who has ordered so far!

Mike

Original contents copyright 2019 by Michael C. Johnston and/or the bylined author. All Rights Reserved. Links in this post may be to our affiliates; sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.

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The Beauty of Physical Prints


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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…Or, why I chose the Ctein prints I chose for the current print sale.

[UPDATE: Sale ended 2 p.m. EST Saturday, March
9th, 2019. Thanks to all who participated!
]

Printmaking—a word that encompasses making photographic prints, and the prints themselves—has always been an exceedingly important part of my enjoyment of photography. I’m both a part of the audience and a maker. I like objects. I like pictures of all sorts. But I especially enjoy well-made photographic prints.

CteinGolden_HoneyHaving done it professionally for a spell in the ’80s and ’90s, I’m aware of some of the problems

CteinAzure_Cascades
CteinGreen_Aurora-sm

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Open Mike: The Thousand Centuries


This post is by Michael Johnston from The Online Photographer


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["Open Mike" is the anything-goes, often off-topic Editorial page of TOP. It's supposed to appear on Wednesdays, but this has been an atypical week for me. That's my excuse. —Mike the Ed.]

Ronnie

Ronnie O'Sullivan, from his Facebook page. With eventual
champion Judd Trump back in the bokeh.

Just briefly—I know a lot of people don't care for cue sports, but I'm a lifelong pool buff and, lately, utterly besotted with the quirky put perfect English game of snooker. Snooker currently has a larger-than-life star whose brilliance, and the beauty of whose play, is vaulting the game to unforeseen

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