What if you forget to deactivate your Avid or Adobe cloud license?

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I had a frustrating scare of my own making recently when I went to boot Avid Media Composer on my laptop, outside of my usual office, and realized instantly as I clicked the icon that I had forgotten to deactivate my MC install at the office before I left. I began to panic as I knew I couldn’t go to the office to deactivate my desktop machine so I could then activate my laptop install. My first thought: Why can’t Avid do it like Adobe does?

Frame.io launches – An interview with founder Emery Wells

By technical editor Matt Allard: Frame.io officially launches today and I took the opportunity to speak to its founder Emery Wells. We discuss what was behind the original concept for Frame.IO, how it works, who it is aimed at and how much it will cost to use. Frame.io is a sharing platform for video that […]

Which cine camera produces the best image? Geoff Boyle has surprises in store

By technical editor Matt Allard: Respected cinematographer Geoff Boyle and CML(the Cinematography Mailing List) have set out to evaluate the image quality of popular cine cameras in their annual camera test evaluation. The controlled evaluations were carried out at the University of the West of England in Bristol, UK on the 24th & 25th January […]

Drone Invasion at NAB Show 2015

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This year's NAB Show is going to be buzzing with drones/UAVs - both literally and figuratively! Starting with two-full-day workshops out in the desert in the Nelson Ghost Town and moving into the NAB Show Expo at the Las Vegas Convention Center, there will be several exhibitors demonstrating their gear as well as several conference sessions plus an all new Aerial Robotics & Drone Pavilion, which will feature scheduled demos and presentations throughout the show with a 30x30' flying cage and several exhibitors.

Easy Photoshop Reflection Photography Tutorial

Have you ever looked at a reflection photograph and thought to yourself that it must be really hard to achieve? Well, we’re here to tell you that it’s not hard at all! Today, we’ve got a very easy Photoshop reflection photography tutorial that will teach you how to add a reflection to your photograph and make it look realistic and smooth.

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Before we start, you must know that reflections work really well on images with open pavement and also HDR processed images that give the pavement a wet look. Once you’ve got your image ready, it’s time to get cracking! In less than 10 minutes, we assure you are going to get a perfect result!

First Step – Copy a Part of the Image

Select the marque tool and draw around the area of your picture that you want to turn into a reflection. Make sure you get enough of the image vertically. Copy the selection you’ve made by right clicking on the image and choose layer via copy from the menu that pops up. You can also copy the selection using copy from the edit menu or using the command/control+c keyboard shortcut.

Second Step – Paste it as a New Layer

If you chose layer via copy, then it automatically pastes as a new layer. If not, then you need to paste it yourself as command/control+v or edit and then paste.

Third Step – Flip the Layer

Once the selected layer is pasted, you need to choose from the edit menu the following selections: transform followed by flip vertical, so that the new layer gets flipped upside down. You want a reflection, right? Well, a reflection is always flipped!

Fourth Step – Position the Layer

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The fourth step is to select the move tool from the tool

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Continue reading "Easy Photoshop Reflection Photography Tutorial"

What’s in your kit bag? – latest Rode video with DP Jason Wingrove

By technical editor Matt Allard: Everybody wants to know ‘What’s in your kit bag?’ It has to be one of the most common questions asked of every filmmaker, DP or audio engineer. Australian microphone maker Rode’s continuing series asks this very question and in the latest episode they talk to our friend Jason Wingrove, a […]

Travel Photographers: This Webcast on my Dubai trip is for you!

Hi Gang: If you’re into travel photography (or just want to learn some interesting things about one of the most amazing places on this planet), then you’re invited to join us for a FREE travel photography Webcast this Thursday night at 7pm called “Unpacking Dubai.”

RC and Brad (who were both in Dubai this month) will be joining me, plus we’ll be giving away some goodies, including a big beautiful print from my trip. We’ll be taking your questions live on the air, and sharing everything from photography tips and techniques to the post processing side of it all. Here’s the details:

Who: Me, Brad and RC
What: A Free Webcast called “Unpacking Dubai” (for travel photographers)
Where: At this link (register for the free webcast now)
When: This Thursday, April 2nd at 7:00 pm New York Time (link to World Time Zone converter)
Why: Because we love travel photography and sharing cool techniques

I’ve got lots of fun stuff to share and some really helpful photo tips, so I hope you can join me (it’s Free) at 7:00 pm ET Thursday (mark your calendar). Also, can you help me spread the word? :) [NOTE: If you can't make the live broadcast, we'll start free re-broadcasts the following day.] 

In the meantime, don’t forget these three things:

(a) Tomorrow is “The Grid” with Peter Hurley as our in-studio guest live at 4pm ET
(b) Follow me on the Periscope App for lots of live behind-the-scenes fun
(c) If you’re into Lightroom, come and learn lots of new stuff at lightroomkillertips.com

Best,

-Scott

Hard-Boiled in Bong Water: Dude, What in the Name of Samuel Spade is Slacker Noir?

What do films featuring hardboiled American crime, venetian blinds, bong water, and complete and utter ennui have in common?

Surprisingly a lot, actually. Slate recently posted a video essay that reveals the peculiar and perfect connections between two sub-genres of films that couldn't seem to be less related: film noir and stoner comedies. If you're a complete film theory/history nerd like yours truly, you're going to want to learn all about "Slacker Noir".

Now, it's important to know about each of these sub-genres to really get a handle on what the video is talking about. First, film noir. So much study has been done on this type of film, specifically by French critics Etienne Chaumeton and Raymond Borde, who characterized these stark, black and white melodramas as "oneiric, strange, erotic, ambivalent, and cruel." Though these five attributes don't completely define or even relate to every film noir, they do speak to the lion's share of them, like The Maltese Falcon, The Big Sleep, Double Indemnity, and Mildred Pierce.

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Pre NAB 2015 “KineMAX 6K for under $10K”

6K RAW In-Camera KineMAX is capable of Capturing and Recording 6K RAW without external recorder. KineMAX is honoured as one of three cinema camera models in this planet. 6K RAW is recorded as KineRAW(.krw) codec which is compressed lossless RAW format developed by Kinefinity. For 4K and lower resolution, it can record Uncompressed CinemaDNG; for 3K and […]

Is This a First Look at Canon’s Upcoming Large Sensor PowerShot Camera?

Update: Oops. It turns out the camera was already named and shown by Canon last month. Please see the update below.


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CES 2015 came and went, and there is still no mention of the large-sensor, large-lens PowerShot camera that Canon started teasing late last year. However, a new photo put up on Canon Netherlands’ PowerShot page appears to show a camera that doesn’t officially exist yet — could this be a first glimpse of the upcoming PowerShot for pros?

As a refresher, in September 2014, Canon sent out a press release that announced the development of a new PowerShot camera. It said:

New PowerShot Digital Compact Camera Under Development
Featuring large image sensor, high zoom capability and compact body

Canon is developing a new premium digital compact camera that combines the merits of both large image sensor and high-magnification optical zoom lens in response to the demands from users looking for high quality high zoom performance. Offering both convenience from a compact body and excellent super telephoto performance, this camera is perfect for everyday or travel shooting in high quality.

Then, in October 2014, Canon put out a video about its PowerShot cameras that mentioned an upcoming PowerShot with a larger sensor and a more powerful zoom range.

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The camera in the teaser was blacked out, and not much was known besides the two details that were mentioned.

Today, a reader informed us (thanks!) of a new image on Canon Netherlands’ website. The image shows a Canon G7X, G1X II, and a third mysterious model that doesn’t look like anything in Canon’s current lineup. It appears to have a DSLR-style grip, a hot shoe, two dials on top, red accent rings on the dials, and a sizable image stabilized zoom lens on the front.

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Here’s an enlarged

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Continue reading "Is This a First Look at Canon’s Upcoming Large Sensor PowerShot Camera?"

Understanding 24-bit vs 16-bit audio production & distribution

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In prior articles, I have clarified how vital it is to record and edit 48 kHz audio for today’s video productions. However, so far, I have barely touched the differences between 24-bit versus 16-bit audio production and distribution, for both audio/video and audio only programs. Whether or not you like Jack Bauer, you need to know about this 24.

Shooting Selfies with Strangers Using a 16mm Bolex Film Camera

Short-film makers Adrian Morphy and Marissa Bergougnou of Rhymes with Orange did an interesting little social experiment recently. They had a guy named Geoffrey Cork stand on a street and ask passersby to stop and pose for a selfie with him. It wasn’t just a smartphone selfie, though, but also one shot with a bulky 16mm Bolex motion picture camera. The black-and-white cinematic selfies turned out pretty well.

‘Stormlapse’ Photographer Ryan McGinnis Shares His Most Epic Shots of 2014

Ryan McGinnis is a photographer and storm chaser whom we interviewed and featured back in 2011. After years of pointing his camera at newsworthy storms, McGinnis switched things up a bit in 2014 by introducing time-lapses into his repertoire. Although he was still learning, he did manage to capture quite a few amazing sequences showing powerful weather events.

The 4.5-minute video above, titled “2014 Stormlapses,” is a highlight reel McGinnis put together to share his best time-lapse sequences.

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McGinnis typically captures photos at a rate of one frame per second using a Canon 50D, Canon 20D, Rokinon 14mm, Canon 17-40mm f/4, and an older Manfrotto aluminum tripod.

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McGinnis is based in Nebraska, which gives him a wide radius of storms he can cover while still returning home on the same day (he says it’s about 400 miles).

Here are a few of the same sequences at 4K resolution:

You can find more of McGinnis’ amazing work on his website and on Flickr.


Image credits: Videos and still frames by Ryan McGinnis

A TEDx Talk by Photographer Leif Norman About the Past and Future of Photography

Professional photographer Leif Norman recently gave a talk at TEDxManitoba titled “The Past and Future of Photography.” Norman spent 18 minutes giving the audience a brief history of photography and sharing Gladys, a large format view camera he built to experiment with older processes.

One of his recent discoveries was that he could scan a 4×5 calotype negative and turn it into a high quality 120 megapixel digital photograph. Gladys is therefore the equivalent of a 820 megapixel camera.

(via TEDxManitoba via ISO 1200)

Grandma Sells Trove of Rare Civil War-Era Photos to the Library of Congress

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A 87-year-old grandmother in Texas has sold a rare and valuable collection of more than 500 Civil War-era photographs to the Library of Congress after building her personal collection for four decades.

The Washington Post reports that Robin Stanford of Houston had gathered together a treasure trove of historical images — some of which may be the only known images to show the things that they depict.

The photos contain images of slaves, plantations, battlefields, and a nation in mourning after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Each item in the collection is a stereo photo, with two shots of the scene arranged side-by-side for viewing through a special stereo viewer.

Stanford says she had been planning to pass the collection on to her son, but his recent death caused her to lose motivation in collecting and decide to sell the archive. The purchase price has not been announced.

Here’s a short segment by the Washington Post about Stanford and the photographs she sold:

Here’s a sampling of the images found in the collection:

Photograph shows a view of Charleston harbor from the battery with a ship at anchor in the distance. One man leans against the fence post while another is seated on a bench.

Photograph shows a view of Charleston harbor from the battery with a ship at anchor in the distance. One man leans against the fence post while another is seated on a bench.

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Rockville Plantation no. 6.

Rockville Plantation no. 6.

Sumter after bombardment.

Sumter after bombardment.

Photograph shows the exterior walls of Fort Sumter damaged by Confederate bombardment. Four men stand near a boat in the foreground.

Photograph shows the exterior walls of Fort Sumter damaged by Confederate bombardment. Four men stand near a boat in the foreground.

Photograph shows activity on Meeting Street in Charleston, with the Classic Revival style Charleston Hotel on the left.

Photograph shows activity on Meeting Street in Charleston, with the Classic Revival style Charleston Hotel on the left.

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 Photograph shows a procession following Abraham Lincoln's funeral car on the streets of Philadelphia, April 22, 1865.

Photograph shows a procession following Abraham Lincoln’s funeral car on the streets of Philadelphia, April 22, 1865.

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Southern artillery militia, Charleston

Southern artillery militia, Charleston

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Photograph shows a street view Abraham Lincoln's home in Springfield, Illinois draped in mourning on the day of his funeral. A horse stands near a wooden plank from the street to the sidewalk.

Photograph shows a street view Abraham Lincoln’s home in Springfield, Illinois draped in mourning on the day of his funeral. A horse stands near a wooden plank from

Photograph shows a group of citizens entering the grounds of the Illinois state house to view the body of Abraham Lincoln on May 3 or 4, 1865. Two soldiers stand near the specially built arch. The African American man with the cane near the head of the line is Reverend Henry Brown.
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Photograph shows the public receiving tomb of Abraham Lincoln at Oak Ridge Cemetery. One man is seated in the foreground and another man stands at the entrance to the vault along with two soldiers in uniform.
Down Broadway, from below Wall St.
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Continue reading "Grandma Sells Trove of Rare Civil War-Era Photos to the Library of Congress"

Video: A Complete Guide to Stanley Kubrick’s Lenses

Filmmakers tend to be kind of like gym bros, because if you imagine cinematic tools as different parts of the body, cameras would be arms and lenses would definitely be legs -- and lots of filmmakers are skipping leg day.

What does this have to do with Stanley Kubrick and lenses? Well, if Kubrick was a gym bro, he'd certainly have a very well-rounded, very rippled, very toned physique -- with calves like tree trunks and quads like -- even bigger tree trucks.

In this short video, hosted by Joe Dunton, who served as Kubrick's camera advisor on Eyes Wide Shut, we get up close and personal with the lenses that made the director's work so iconic and unique.

We've covered Kubrick's lenses before, namely the Zeiss f/0.7 he used for the candlelit scene in Barry Lyndon, but this video provides an exhaustive look into the gear bag of the great director. It's truly interesting to see how particular the ol' perfectionist filmmaker truly was when it came to the tools he was working with -- modifying and customizing his favorite lenses to fit his favorite camera, the Arriflex IIC.

Read More

Video: A Complete Guide to Stanley Kubrick’s Lenses

Filmmakers tend to be kind of like gym bros, because if you imagine cinematic tools as different parts of the body, cameras would be arms and lenses would definitely be legs -- and lots of filmmakers are skipping leg day.

What does this have to do with Stanley Kubrick and lenses? Well, if Kubrick was a gym bro, he'd certainly have a very well-rounded, very rippled, very toned physique -- with calves like tree trunks and quads like -- even bigger tree trucks.

In this short video, hosted by Joe Dunton, who served as Kubrick's camera advisor on Eyes Wide Shut, we get up close and personal with the lenses that made the director's work so iconic and unique.

We've covered Kubrick's lenses before, namely the Zeiss f/0.7 he used for the candlelit scene in Barry Lyndon, but this video provides an exhaustive look into the gear bag of the great director. It's truly interesting to see how particular the ol' perfectionist filmmaker truly was when it came to the tools he was working with -- modifying and customizing his favorite lenses to fit his favorite camera, the Arriflex IIC.

Read More

Video: A Complete Guide to Stanley Kubrick’s Lenses

Filmmakers tend to be kind of like gym bros, because if you imagine cinematic tools as different parts of the body, cameras would be arms and lenses would definitely be legs -- and lots of filmmakers are skipping leg day.

What does this have to do with Stanley Kubrick and lenses? Well, if Kubrick was a gym bro, he'd certainly have a very well-rounded, very rippled, very toned physique -- with calves like tree trunks and quads like -- even bigger tree trucks.

In this short video, hosted by Joe Dunton, who served as Kubrick's camera advisor on Eyes Wide Shut, we get up close and personal with the lenses that made the director's work so iconic and unique.

We've covered Kubrick's lenses before, namely the Zeiss f/0.7 he used for the candlelit scene in Barry Lyndon, but this video provides an exhaustive look into the gear bag of the great director. It's truly interesting to see how particular the ol' perfectionist filmmaker truly was when it came to the tools he was working with -- modifying and customizing his favorite lenses to fit his favorite camera, the Arriflex IIC.

Read More