Blending Fiction and Doc in the Undercover Casino Production of ‘Las Vegas Story’


This post is by Oakley Anderson-Moore from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Does the progress towards cameras being smaller and less conspicuous give narrative films more freedom to get closer to reality?

After befriending Christina Bocanegra at a nightclub in Las Vegas years ago, Byron Q created a script with a lead based on her experiences as an escort in the underbelly of the city. Instead of finding an actress to play the role and stage the Vegas Strip setting, Byron decided to cast Christina and film in secret throughout the casinos of Las Vegas. No Film School sat down with Byron to get an inside scoop on filming undercover in the hybrid fiction-reality film, Las Vegas Story.




NFS: Why did you decide to work with Christina Bocanegra and have her play a version of herself in a fiction film?

Read More

Blending Fiction and Doc in the Undercover Casino Production of ‘Las Vegas Story’


This post is by Oakley Anderson-Moore from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Does the progress towards cameras being smaller and less conspicuous give narrative films more freedom to get closer to reality?

After befriending Christina Bocanegra at a nightclub in Las Vegas years ago, Byron Q created a script with a lead based on her experiences as an escort in the underbelly of the city. Instead of finding an actress to play the role and stage the Vegas Strip setting, Byron decided to cast Christina and film in secret throughout the casinos of Las Vegas. No Film School sat down with Byron to get an inside scoop on filming undercover in the hybrid fiction-reality film, Las Vegas Story.




NFS: Why did you decide to work with Christina Bocanegra and have her play a version of herself in a fiction film?

Read More

Pre NAB 2015 NEWS…Canon to show new 4K cinema camera


This post is by HD Warrior from HD Warrior


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Here is a glimpse of a new 4K camera from Canon showing it off is Canon China President & CEO Hideki Ozawa. 1″ CMOS Sensor 58mm filter Built-in Wi-Fi Similar shape to the Canon EOS 70D External viewfinder Canon 10X optical zoom 8.9-89mm f/2.8-5.6 4k video fixed lens (35mm Equi. 24-240mm) This seems to be from the domestic side of Canon as […]

It’s Free Stuff Thursday!


This post is by Brad Moore from Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Moose Peterson’s Safari Adventure
Moose goes on safari! With a career studying and photographing wildlife for over three decades, Moose has his first African safari and you’ve got a front row seat. Join Moose as he encounters the wide array of wildlife that calls the Mala Mala Game Reserve in South Africa home. Moose shares his take on the gear he brought along with his tips and techniques for capturing images that help tell the story of your trip.

KelbyOne Live
Want to learn from Scott Kelby or Joel Grimes live in person? Check out these seminar tour dates to see if they’re coming to a city near you!

Shoot Like A Pro: Reloaded with Scott Kelby
Apr 13 – Salt Lake City, UT
Apr 15 – Los Angeles, CA

The Photographers Creative Revolution Tour with Joel Grimes
Mar 27 – Minneapolis, MN
Apr 17 – New York, NY
Apr 22 – San Antonio, TX
Apr 24 – Houston, TX

Leave a comment for your chance to win a free ticket to one of these events!

Last Week’s Winner
KelbyOne Live Ticket
– Tim James

If that’s you, we’ll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!

Interesting freak workaround for GH4/YAGH owners on the sound monitoring delay using the YAGH.


This post is by HD Warrior from HD Warrior


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




After installing FW 2.1 on my Panasonic GH4 I decided to re-visit the Sound Output tab to see if Panasonic had resolved the RECSOUND greyed out menu bar but sadly it has not been addressed, leaving many of us with sound monitoring that is slightly out of sync with what you are recording…very annoying. I […]

From Cinematography to VFX, the BAFTA Film Craft Sessions Will Learn You Some Things


This post is by V Renée from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




What do you call a bunch of world renowned artists in filmmaking sharing their wisdom and sharing their craft with all of the cinematic world? Answer: the BAFTA Film Craft Sessions.

BAFTA held these panels with some some of the best visual effects artists, editors, and production designers in the industry at their headquarters in London last week. The following videos are only a few of the many BAFTA released — one especially interesting one features Robert Yeoman, the brilliant mind behind the camera work in all of Wes Anderson’s films. He shares the techniques he and his team uses in order to pull off symmetry, working with Anderson, and how to increase “visual possibilities”.

Check them out below:

Cinematography

Visual Effects

Editing

Production Design

You can check out the rest of the series on BAFTA Guru’s YouTube channel, which includes discussions on hair and makeup, costume design, sound engineering, and scoring.

Read More

From Cinematography to VFX, the BAFTA Film Craft Sessions Will Learn You Some Things


This post is by V Renée from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




What do you call a bunch of world renowned artists in filmmaking sharing their wisdom and sharing their craft with all of the cinematic world? Answer: the BAFTA Film Craft Sessions.

BAFTA held these panels with some some of the best visual effects artists, editors, and production designers in the industry at their headquarters in London last week. The following videos are only a few of the many BAFTA released — one especially interesting one features Robert Yeoman, the brilliant mind behind the camera work in all of Wes Anderson’s films. He shares the techniques he and his team uses in order to pull off symmetry, working with Anderson, and how to increase “visual possibilities”.

Check them out below:

Cinematography

Visual Effects

Editing

Production Design

You can check out the rest of the series on BAFTA Guru’s YouTube channel, which includes discussions on hair and makeup, costume design, sound engineering, and scoring.

Read More

Reikan announces major update to FoCal AF tuning software


This post is by Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com) from Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Reikan has announced a major update to its AF tuning software, FoCal. FoCal automates the process of calibrating your lens to your DSLR camera body, important – if not absolutely necessary – for critical focus when using fast lenses that yield shallow depth-of-field. Version 2 introduces the ability to check your copy of a lens against other users’ test results. Read more

Impossible launches B&W 2.0 quick-process instant film for 600 series cameras


This post is by Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com) from Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Instant film manufacturer Impossible has launched what it calls a Generation 2.0 film called B&W 2.0. The company claims it’s not only sharper and clearer than previous Impossible products, but also develops much quicker. The new film is the result of a new chemical formula for Impossible that has been developed by former Polaroid research chemist Stephen Herchen. Read more

What Do Filmmaking & Scrabble Have in Common? More than You Might Think


This post is by Robert Hardy from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Our friend Simon Cade, whose YouTube channel and blog are quickly becoming favorites of mine, recently put together the above video in an attempt to boil down the filmmaking process to its core elements, and to explain that process to people who are just getting started on their own filmmaking journeys. In doing so, he revealed a few key points that even more experienced filmmakers ought to revisit from time to time.


First and foremost is the idea that we often try to do too much with our early films. We constantly watch films and shows, and we analyze them and get inspired by them. Ultimately, we end up adding those themes and techniques and shot choices to our own mental libraries of cool filmmaking ideas. When the opportunity arises to work on a project, all of those ideas come spilling out, and we try to incorporate as many of them as possible into that project because they’re all just so badass. Unfortunately, that rarely leads to a good or coherent film (unless that film is House). The truth is that the best films are often some of the simplest in terms of their style.

Read More

What Do Filmmaking & Scrabble Have in Common? More than You Might Think


This post is by Robert Hardy from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Our friend Simon Cade, whose YouTube channel and blog are quickly becoming favorites of mine, recently put together the above video in an attempt to boil down the filmmaking process to its core elements, and to explain that process to people who are just getting started on their own filmmaking journeys. In doing so, he revealed a few key points that even more experienced filmmakers ought to revisit from time to time.


First and foremost is the idea that we often try to do too much with our early films. We constantly watch films and shows, and we analyze them and get inspired by them. Ultimately, we end up adding those themes and techniques and shot choices to our own mental libraries of cool filmmaking ideas. When the opportunity arises to work on a project, all of those ideas come spilling out, and we try to incorporate as many of them as possible into that project because they’re all just so badass. Unfortunately, that rarely leads to a good or coherent film (unless that film is House). The truth is that the best films are often some of the simplest in terms of their style.

Read More

What Do Filmmaking & Scrabble Have in Common? More than You Might Think


This post is by Robert Hardy from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Our friend Simon Cade, whose YouTube channel and blog are quickly becoming favorites of mine, recently put together the above video in an attempt to boil down the filmmaking process to its core elements, and to explain that process to people who are just getting started on their own filmmaking journeys. In doing so, he revealed a few key points that even more experienced filmmakers ought to revisit from time to time.


First and foremost is the idea that we often try to do too much with our early films. We constantly watch films and shows, and we analyze them and get inspired by them. Ultimately, we end up adding those themes and techniques and shot choices to our own mental libraries of cool filmmaking ideas. When the opportunity arises to work on a project, all of those ideas come spilling out, and we try to incorporate as many of them as possible into that project because they’re all just so badass. Unfortunately, that rarely leads to a good or coherent film (unless that film is House). The truth is that the best films are often some of the simplest in terms of their style.

Read More

University of Texas crowdfunding project will release macro images into public domain


This post is by Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com) from Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The University of Texas has initiated a new crowdfunding campaign that, if successful, will result in macro photos of insects being released into the public domain. The funding for the project will be used to support the students learning to use the imaging system, to improve the photography hardware, and to help pay for the Web hosting. Read more

5 Decisive Moments Captured on Lattice


This post is by Fernando Gomes from PhotoShelter Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Each week, we compile our favorite photos from Lattice, our new destination for people who love photography. You can use Lattice to discover beautiful images and also curate boards on topics you’re passionate about.

This week, we combed through Lattice to find the 5 best street photographs that exemplified the diversity of the niche as well as harkened back to its origins with a focus on Henri Cartier-Bresson and the decisive moment.

Take a look:

To start off, we take on a formalist aesthetic with this photo by Cecilia Colussi. The lines, shapes, and tones, reminiscent of both Paul Strand and Alexander Rodchenko, and the inclusion of the subjects and the airplane give this photograph depth and a strong graphic composition. Check out Tina Granzo’s board Point and Line to Plane, for more photos like this.

Photo by Cecilia Colussi

Photo by Cecilia Colussi

Here, we examine this intricately composed image taken on the streets of Lisbon by Bruno Morandi. The references to mid 20th century street photography are abundant here, from the layered frame, to the subject of childhood (Helen Levitt), to the most prominent boy with the gun, as in William Klein’s iconic photo. Explore Portugal’s capital with the Lisbon board, curated by João Almeida.

Photo by Bruno Morandi

Photo by Bruno Morandi

Next, we move on to Sébastien Lèbegue’s photo of a tourist in Japan taking a snapshot. With the camera covering his face, the subject obstructs himself from that very thing he is photographing, resulting in a filtered experience, much like in Martin Parr’s early 90s photos critiquing mass tourism. Go full on meta and check out Meagan Ziegler-Haynes great board on People With Cameras.

Photo by Sebastien Lebegue

Photo by Sebastien Lebegue

Now, we welcome the downright odd with this photo taken in Coney Island by Dana Ullman. Humor has been a consistent factor in street photography,

Photo by Dana Ullman
Photo by Calias
check-out-lattice-cta

Continue reading “5 Decisive Moments Captured on Lattice”

SmallHD Introduces a 5″ 1080p Monitor Weighing Less Than One Pound


This post is by Joe Marine from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




External monitors have become a pretty necessary tool on set.

While it’s nice to have giant monitors for when you’ve got a decent crew or your camera is built up, there are plenty of times that you just wish you could use your phone as a reliable monitor for a small camera or as a director’s monitor (with certain tools this is possible, but it’s not always an ideal solution).


SmallHD essentially introduced just that today with their new 502 external monitor, that features a 5″ 1080p screen with HD-SDI and HDMI input/output/cross-convert, and it’s powered by Canon batteries. You can check out the intro video by clicking here.

Read More

SmallHD Introduces a 5″ 1080p Monitor Weighing Less Than One Pound


This post is by Joe Marine from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




External monitors have become a pretty necessary tool on set.

While it’s nice to have giant monitors for when you’ve got a decent crew or your camera is built up, there are plenty of times that you just wish you could use your phone as a reliable monitor for a small camera or as a director’s monitor (with certain tools this is possible, but it’s not always an ideal solution).


SmallHD essentially introduced just that today with their new 502 external monitor, that features a 5″ 1080p screen with HD-SDI and HDMI input/output/cross-convert, and it’s powered by Canon batteries. You can check out the intro video by clicking here.

Read More

SmallHD Introduces a 5″ 1080p Monitor Weighing Less Than One Pound


This post is by Joe Marine from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




External monitors have become a pretty necessary tool on set.

While it’s nice to have giant monitors for when you’ve got a decent crew or your camera is built up, there are plenty of times that you just wish you could use your phone as a reliable monitor for a small camera or as a director’s monitor (with certain tools this is possible, but it’s not always an ideal solution).


SmallHD essentially introduced just that today with their new 502 external monitor, that features a 5″ 1080p screen with HD-SDI and HDMI input/output/cross-convert, and it’s powered by Canon batteries. You can check out the intro video by clicking here.

Read More

New Guide! The SEO Guide for Photographers


This post is by Sarah Jacobs from PhotoShelter Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When it comes to Search Engine Optimization, the most important question you can ask yourself is: how can I improve my SEO so my photography business is easily found online? The SEO Guide for Photographers, (re-released with the newest, most relevant information) answers this question and gives a lay person’s low down on the oft-misunderstood world of search engines. This Guide will help you gain a better understanding of Google Analytics, become familiar with SEO lingo, and help you understand why you’re not topping the search list on Google.

Inside the Guide you’ll find:

  • How Google’s search engine works to find and rank results
  • The factors that directly influence your SEO
  • How PhotoShelter can help with your SEO
  • How to perform backlink analysis
  • How long it will take to see results

Plus, dive in and start improving your SEO today with 12 actionable steps you can take – from “basic” to “expert” we’ve got you covered.

2015-03-23_GUIDE_SEO-CTA

 

Very excited that @ninoleitner and I have just booked our venue…


This post is by Philip Bloom from Philip Bloom


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Very excited that @ninoleitner and I have just booked our venue for the first in a new series of small group practical 3 day filmmaking workshops starting in July.

This is our first venue which is a stunning country mansion just outside London. Future workshops in different countries. Will announce details of this one soon.

Here’s What Robert Duvall Can Tell You About Being a Director


This post is by Oakley Anderson-Moore from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Credit: Fred Hayes



Who would know more about getting performances from actors than someone whose career encompasses studying under Sanford Meisner, breaking out in Robert Altman’s Mash, and creating legendary roles in Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather and Apocalypse Now?

The acclaimed Robert Duvall, whose fourth narrative film as director, Wild Horses, just premiered at the 2015 SXSW Film Festival, sat down with No Film School to talk about anything from his influences, not rehearsing with actors, not watching playback on takes, and the future of independent film.


NFS: What would you say is the core artistic difference when you come into a film as an actor versus as a director?

Read More