The High Cost of Perfection


This post is by Ken Mitchell from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Walking past booth after booth at the PhotoPlus Expo in New York, I often heard camera company presenters explaining to their uncomfortably-seated, yet nonetheless-enraptured, audiences how they shot the “perfect” photo.

This was typically further explained as having achieved the perfect lighting, the perfect exposure, clear focus from edge-to-edge, etc. — typical technical rules we all know and try to follow, well, until we don’t. I wondered: Where does this obsession with perfection come from, and what is the cost to our creative output?

Actually, it is not hard to trace photography’s obsession with perfection. Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac’s 1840s report to

Continue reading “The High Cost of Perfection”

Is GoPro Failing as a Company?


This post is by Usman Dawood from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Almost every year, GoPro releases a new action camera, and for the last few years, they’ve been pretty disappointing. Also, every year I seem to fall for their marketing and buy one of their action cameras only to lament that decision. I understand it’s my fault, I should know better. Clearly, I’m operating with heaps of wishful thinking.

Earlier in 2018, there were reports that GoPro was looking for a buyer. The company has been hemorrhaging cash and is struggling with debt. Their drone division has been completely killed off and their action cameras have been getting nothing but lackluster

Continue reading “Is GoPro Failing as a Company?”

The New York Times’ Photographic Double Standard


This post is by Allen Murabayashi from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In covering the terrorist attack on a Nairobi hotel that killed at least 21 people by Shahab extremists, The New York Times decided to publish an image of a bullet-riddled body taken by Khalil Senosi. Photo Twitter was outraged, and Poynter wrote about the “hard choice” the NYT made regarding the selection.

Warning: This article contains graphic images.

Author Tom Jones approached the controversy from the oft-discussed angle of “is it newsworthy?”

In other words, what is the news value? Does the public need to see such an image to fully grasp what happened? Does the public need

Continue reading “The New York Times’ Photographic Double Standard”

Backpacking the World with a 500mm Prime Lens


This post is by Jono Dashper from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




6 months ago, my girlfriend and I finally did what we had always dreamed of doing: quitting our jobs and traveling the world. This is a relatively normal narrative for western couples in their 20s, but the difference here is I am a passionate wildlife photographer.

We planned to travel for approximately 2 years (or until our money runs out) and so far have visited Indonesia, Nepal, India, and Sri Lanka. Over the years I collected my photography kit to reflect my needs for wildlife photography, but leading into the trip, I needed to decide what I would be taking

Continue reading “Backpacking the World with a 500mm Prime Lens”

The Move to Mirrorless From DSLRs


This post is by Daniel Lee from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Back in May of last year, I finally made the move and got myself an a7 III. I had wanted a Sony body for quite some time but was hesitant to switch. Before getting into my long-term review, I’ll first explain what made me make the switch.

When I sold my original Canon 6D, I was left to use my M5 for a little over a month. During that time, I grew to prefer the EVF. I loved the ability to always see my exposure before I took the shot, rather than chimping after. This is also possible by shooting

Continue reading “The Move to Mirrorless From DSLRs”

Can Photography Move You to Tears?


This post is by Saurabh Narang from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Can photography move you to tears? It seems like human emotions are difficult to unlock as a photographer, especially in our oversaturated world of Instagram; as of 2018, a staggering 95 million photos and videos are uploaded onto Instagram every single day. It’s more difficult than ever for a photograph to have an impact — we’ve all debated it before, and we’ve probably seen still photography as a dying profession.

Yet, despite this, certain photographs still have the power to astound.

A few days ago, I met a woman named Anchi at a local cafe in Gangtok, India. We talked

Continue reading “Can Photography Move You to Tears?”

Why the Film Lab of the Future is Open Source


This post is by Emil Prakertia Raji from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




We are approaching the peak capacity for film photography labs. The machines are old, the parts are scarce, the demand is high. The measly Kodak Pakon Scanner, terrible it may be, fetches absurdly high prices.

The two brands and workflows that need to be replicated are Fujifilm and Noritsu. A theoretical duopoly, but here lies the problem: Fuji is dead. When will Noritsu follow suit? All the remaining hardware is on life support, waiting to die. The state of the film lab is much the same as the state of premium compacts of the 90s.

We need to think

Continue reading “Why the Film Lab of the Future is Open Source”

9 Things I Learned From My First Photo Exhibition


This post is by Simon King from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




One of my photography New Year’s resolutions was to start to push my work to galleries and public photography showcases. In my mind, having my work in-print and in-public are some of the most significant steps in advancing my career as a fine art street photographer.

I’ve applied to gallery spaces before but always half-heartedly — part of me thought my work wasn’t up to scratch. However, after a recent review of my work, I feel that enough individual pieces have merit to be shown off.

I was contacted in late December by someone who had initially turned down my

Continue reading “9 Things I Learned From My First Photo Exhibition”

Film is Alive!… But it May Have a Terminal Illness


This post is by James Cater from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The defiant cry of the nostalgic hipster that’s become a hashtag: #filmisnotdead. But why? It’s 2019, people — the digital camera reigns supreme; why won’t this analog trend die? Rationalism abandons the old way in recognition of the new’s superior efficiency. The combine harvester supplanted the scythe, clocks replaced the sundial, and electric lights extinguished the candle.

However, technology in art does not often follow such a linear path of progression, as art does not demand rationality — sometimes it can even suffer for it. Part of this is because fashion and trend influences so much of what people consume,

Continue reading “Film is Alive!… But it May Have a Terminal Illness”

Photography is the Bastard Art


This post is by Joel Wolfson from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Photography is the bastard art. There are many reasons for this, not the least of which is that everyone owns a smartphone and many of those people are under the mistaken impression that they are “excellent” photographers.

We’ve also been brainwashed by decades of advertising from Canon, Nikon, Sony, and many others with the message that all you have to do is use their camera, lens or printing paper and your images will “look” professional. This is akin to saying “if you buy a Stradivarius violin you will play like Itzhak Perlman.” And as we know, a top-notch camera

Continue reading “Photography is the Bastard Art”

Rangefinder Cameras and the Power of Imagination


This post is by Simon King from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




One of the most overlooked aspects of the rangefinder method of photography, when comparing it to other systems, is the role of imagination when it comes to the focus and pre-visualisation of the composition.

Most proponents of the system will highlight the convenience of the frame lines, which allow the photographer to view context and elements about to enter the scene, which may inform their decision on timing and re-composition. At no point do you have a true preview in the rangefinder of what the image will look like, as unlike a DSLR you are not looking directly through the

Continue reading “Rangefinder Cameras and the Power of Imagination”

Where Mirrorless is Headed in 2019


This post is by Thom Hogan from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




2018 was an important year for mirrorless. As we kick off the new year, it’s a good time for some reflection on the market. I’ve written quite a bit about where we are now that all the big players are seriously in the mirrorless game. This time I thought I’d write about what I think each company will/should be doing in the coming year+.

Technology is relentless, so unless a company has clear plans that match up with ongoing customer needs and expectations, it’s easy to make a misstep.

I’m tackling this topic in two articles. This article is more

Continue reading “Where Mirrorless is Headed in 2019”

You Be You, I’ll Be Me: A Note to Photographers on Pricing


This post is by Cindy Johnson from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you are a member of any photography groups, I can guarantee you’ve seen the issue of pricing come up often. One of the favorite activities of some photographers seems to be analyzing/criticizing how others run their businesses. It’s wonderful to be able to ask for advice in these groups, but unsolicited criticism, or random rants on how everyone else is doing it all wrong and you’re doing it right, are never okay.

One of the main complaints I see is “you are devaluing my business by charging less than me.” I know, right? I mean that’s a complaint

Continue reading “You Be You, I’ll Be Me: A Note to Photographers on Pricing”

What You Need to Know About Flickr Pro’s Adobe Discount


This post is by Mattias Hedberg from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




My name is Mattias Hedberg, and I’m a photographer based in Norrköping, Sweden. I was recently about to get the Flickr Pro upgrade and was hovering above the buy button when I decided to take a deeper look at the Adobe offer since it sounded a little too good. I was interested in other features of the plan also, but the Adobe one was very tempting.

Get 15% off Creative Cloud, Adobe’s impressive suite of creative apps that includes Lightroom and Photoshop.

I could not find any information about this offer on Flickr except this blurb. There’s nothing in

Continue reading “What You Need to Know About Flickr Pro’s Adobe Discount”

How Misconceptions Can Affect Your Travel Photography Project


This post is by Asher Svidensky from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




There is a particular obstacle that stands in the way of almost all travel, documentary and cultural photographers alike and, for some reason, no one seems to be willing to talk about it — so I’m going to.

The way I see it, that obstacle could be best described as ‘misconception.’ No matter how hard I try to prepare for what may lay ahead in my photography projects, it never ceases to amaze me how much of a difference there is between what I think I’m going to find and what is really out there.

So many times places

Continue reading “How Misconceptions Can Affect Your Travel Photography Project”

Defending ‘Needles in the Sewer’ and Photographing the Disadvantaged


This post is by Simon King from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




One of my images has been subjected to criticism and scrutiny in a way that none of my other work ever has. The photograph in question is of a scene in London, Chinatown; a man reaches into a sewer while shouting about how someone threw his needles down there.

I waited a moment or two before I decided to make a photograph, shot two frames, and then continued my walk. At the time I took it I knew there would be a strong response to the photograph, both artistically and philosophically/ethically.

However, it will always be the prerogative of the

Continue reading “Defending ‘Needles in the Sewer’ and Photographing the Disadvantaged”

4 Good Reasons + 1 Barely Adequate Justification to Shoot With a Rangefinder


This post is by James Cater from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The SLR has been the dominant camera type in photography for the last 70 years. SLRs are more intuitive, easy to focus, and versatile when it comes to mounting lenses of any length. So why does the rangefinder, as a design, persist into the modern era? There is not a single reason why anyone should be using these archaic and fiddly cameras when more advanced and efficient machines exist.

There are actually 5 reasons:

Demon’s Taking Shelter from the Rain. Taken with Leica MD Typ-262 and Distagon 18mm (cropped)

1. They Are Harder to Use, and You Look Cool Shooting

Continue reading “4 Good Reasons + 1 Barely Adequate Justification to Shoot With a Rangefinder”

A Guide to Shooting Portraits with Kodak Ektar 100


This post is by James Cater from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Kodak Ektar is the reason I fell in love with film photography. My first roll completely blew all of my digital shots out of the water. I was used to the ugly JPEGS that my old Nikon D40 spat out and Ektar just gave me what I wanted — sharp pictures, with silky grain and a look that I didn’t know how to edit for.

I followed the recommendation I received by the person who sold me it: use it to shoot things and places and was not disappointed:

The tones are fantastic, with dark shadows and highlights that retain

Continue reading “A Guide to Shooting Portraits with Kodak Ektar 100”

How I Got Banned from Photographing the Band Arch Enemy


This post is by J Salmeron from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Back in June I covered Fortarock, a fantastic metal festival in Nijmegen, the Netherlands. I had the opportunity to shoot bands like Dragonforce, Watain, Týr, Alestorm and Arch Enemy, all of whom are not only really fun to photograph, but also extremely talented musicians.

This being the Netherlands, shooting the festival also meant dealing with quite a bit of rain, particularly during the first day. Arch Enemy were particularly unlucky in this regard since their set coincided with a massive downpour. This meant that I had to juggle my equipment while hiding under a poncho, trying to make sure

Continue reading “How I Got Banned from Photographing the Band Arch Enemy”

My Lesson Learned in Handing Money to a Photo Marketing ‘Expert’


This post is by Cody Schultz from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Back in November of 2018, I put forward $450 in hopes of being provided help with the marketing of my fine art photography. Feeling lost, I figured that paying someone who had been doing this craft – and supposedly making a very fine living off it – for the past 17+ years was the best option I had. I was oh so terribly wrong.

Note: The names of people involved have been changed in this article.

I first heard of Robert Clow’s work through a fellow landscape photographer who has been successful in making a living from selling at

Continue reading “My Lesson Learned in Handing Money to a Photo Marketing ‘Expert’”