Is Street Photography a Fad that Has Run Its Course?


This post is by Des Byrne from PetaPixel


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Fourteen years ago I took an interest in Street Photography. I went looking for resources and information on this amazing genre, unfortunately to no avail, until I came across a great free ebook in 2006 called “Street Photography for the purist” by Chris Weeks.

I downloaded and printed and read every page, but still, no good books were available in the coming years explaining in layman’s terms how to take good street shots, what settings to use, etc. until James Maher published the “The Essentials of Street Photography” in 2012.

This, for me, was a game changer, as was the

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The Art of De-escalation in Street Photography


This post is by Dave Bottoms from PetaPixel


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“Take another photo and I’m going to shove that camera up your a**.” Beware of small guys with big mouths. That’s the takeaway here.

Clearly he was not impressed, and although he was a head shorter than me, his steely-eyed glare exuded a level of confidence a full foot taller than his boyish, brown brush cut. Maybe he was well versed in the martial arts, with a quick karate chop to the cranium at the ready. Maybe his green Canada Goose coat concealed a weapon of the deadly variety. How I reacted to him would determine what came next.

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Capturing Portraits in Indonesia’s Trash Dumps with a Dislocated Knee


This post is by Tom Barnes from PetaPixel


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I’ve always laughed when, as a photographer, people ask me if I can deal with a difficult client or shoot in a difficult situation. But even still, things are never going to be as bad as the conditions on my most recent trip – after this, I feel like I can shoot anywhere.

I travel the world, self-funding personal projects that many people wouldn’t touch. My latest personal project took me to Indonesia, starting in Jakarta and ending on Bali. My local team and I zig-zagged down through the Islands, shooting two very different projects, and Pemulung is the first

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Are Your Social Media Photos Ending Up In a Law Enforcement Database?


This post is by Allen Murabayashi from PetaPixel


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Facial recognition is an incredibly useful consumer tool for organizing our burgeoning photo albums. Companies like Google and Apple have slowly integrated machine learning algorithms into their consumer photo products, which allow you to search by keywords without the need for manual tagging, or to simply click on a face to see more photos of that person.

Programmers have been gradually improving facial recognition algorithms, but they are not without problems and critics. And while today’s best algorithms boast accuracy rates in the high 90th percentile – approaching or outperforming humans – they still struggle with people of color and/or

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3 Ways the Fuji X100 Changed the Camera Industry Forever


This post is by Michael Comeau from PetaPixel


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The Fujifilm X100 was the single most impactful camera of the 2010s. I’ve seen folks say the same about the Sony a7/a7R, Samsung Galaxy NX1, and various Micro Four Thirds cameras, but I will argue that the Fujifilm X100 delivered a bigger bang than all of them combined.

About the Fuji X100

Fuji is the 5th generation of its X100 camera series with the new X100V. But the original Fuji X100, originally released in February 2011, was a revelation.

It sported an APS-C sensor, a unique hybrid viewfinder system, and a high quality 23mm f/2 leaf shutter lens

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A Brief History of Nikon… and Why the New Flagship D6 DSLR Falls Short


This post is by John McMurtrie from PetaPixel


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I used to work for Nikon cameras. From 1995 through 1999, I was Nikon UK’s Senior Photographic Advisor. My job was basically to be the guy in the building who knew what a camera was for!

The job was the best for a while and I got to work with and meet many talented people. I also got to use and borrow the kit which helped me establish my career in photography. It has been 20 years since I left and many of the staff (past and present) are still good friends to this day.

Although I no longer work

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Which Photojournalist Helped Design That $850 Jacket? An Examination


This post is by Allen Murabayashi from PetaPixel


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Photo Twitter collectively chuckled at the announced availability of Canada Goose’s Photojournalist Jacket. With editorial day rates hovering below $300/assignment, actual photojournalists were unlikely to be purchasing such a luxury item – even if it was inexpensive by Canada Goose standards.

Created in partnership with a photojournalist to stand up to the changing climates and situations they often find themselves in. This jacket is crafted from our Tri-Durance SS fabric to block harsh winds and rain. Reinforced shoulders and pockets add durability, while side seam zippers open up for range of motion and venting.

Photographers, This is Why Other Photographers Hate Adobe


This post is by Adam Marsh from PetaPixel


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My name is Adam Marsh, and I’m a Melbourne-based event photographer. I recently wrote an article titled “Adobe, This is Why Photographers Are Hating on You,” and it seems to have been incredibly divisive. There was a huge amount of feedback and engagement on this topic in the wider global photography community.

I’ve received many messages of support, scrutiny, and even a 1-hour podcast devoted to picking apart my last article.

Contrary to popular belief, I’m not endorsed by Affinity at all (although I’d welcome it gladly!). Given how much of a hot topic Adobe as a

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The Nikon D6 is a Pro Camera for a Vanishingly Small Demographic


This post is by Allen Murabayashi from PetaPixel


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When it comes to technology, consumers have been conditioned to expect notable feature changes with version numbers increases. The iPhone 11 Pro, for example, not only included the snappier A13 Bionic chip, it also sported a three lens array and significantly better low light performance.

Back in September 2019, Nikon made a development announcement of the flagship D6 without providing any details. The lack of specificity wasn’t particularly unusual, and the industry was expecting a new body in advance of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. In the meantime, Canon finally released its EOS-1D Mark III, which on paper looks like a

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Why Won’t the ’72dpi’ Myth Die?


This post is by David Garnick from PetaPixel


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When they were young, my children used to get very excited about Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny. But they saw through those by the time they were six. So why has the myth of saving JPEG files at 72dpi lasted far more than six years?

I see it everywhere: instructions to save and submit files at 72dpi (dots per inch). Major international competitions, grant programs, and online publications specify that submitted images must be 72dpi. It makes no sense now, and it never did.

Decades ago computer screens commonly had 72ppi (pixels per inch)—as opposed to the roughly 200

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Why Did Canon Just Now Decide to Wake Up?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


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Last night we got our first official glance at Canon’s vision for their future in the R5 development announcement, and it looks to finally be an example of full-frame mirrorless taken seriously. In a morning discussion here at PetaPixel, the question was raised: why did Canon just now decide to wake up?

I have a theory on that matter.

Late last year, I published a State of RF Mount editorial that looked at what Canon did in their first year with the new mount. I encourage you to read that here, but in short, I said they did

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The Curse of ‘Comparisonitis’: 7 Tips to Make You Less Miserable as a Photog


This post is by Ellie Cotton from PetaPixel


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“Comparisonitis” is the phenomenon of comparing yourself negatively to others; feeling that your life, love, work, holidays, house, or just the tidyness of your undersink cupboard, just aren’t as good as someone else’s.

Earlier this month, I found myself in a room of 50 professional photographers at the SHOOT EDIT CHAT REPEAT LIVE podcast event. If you don’t know about it already, SHOOT EDIT CHAT REPEAT is a fabulous podcast hosted by photographers Vicki Knights and Eddie Judd.

The event began with a keynote speech from Lucy Sheridan, “the world’s first and only comparison coach”. Photographers seem to be

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A Photo Portfolio Doesn’t Need to be a Website


This post is by Simon King from PetaPixel


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Well-curated portfolios can be some of the most powerful tools available to a photographer looking to efficiently communicate what they’re about to potential clients and customers. The classic portfolio is a physical book of prints, maybe 10-20 total, often accompanied by a declaration of intent in writing or in person if being showcased at an actual critique session.

Unless you are simply seeking feedback from peers or industry experts, then the purpose of a portfolio as most people tend to talk about them today is almost as a CV, used with the intent of winning over a client by demonstrating

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Fuji Revealed How Their Ambassador Takes Photos. Then He Was Canceled.


This post is by Allen Murabayashi from PetaPixel


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As a part of the launch of the Fuji X100V, Fujifilm posted a video on their YouTube channel of Japanese street photographer Tatsuo Suzuki at work. Suzuki’s aggressive style rubbed people the wrong way, and within the week, he was scrubbed from the campaign, and then erased from the Fujifilm website.

Although Fujifim has yet to confirm, Suzuki has ostensibly been dropped as a Fujifilm X Photographer.

At first glance, Suzuki’s style is shocking. Never walking in a straight line, Suzuki bobs and weaves into position in an aggressive manner. The subjects that see him in advance do their best

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Why Print Wins Over Digital Every Time


This post is by Haleana Knights from PetaPixel


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Here’s why print wins over digitals every time. Really, it’s simple. It’s all about our children.

In this digital age, we are in such a rush. Everything has to be instant. It has to happen NOW. It’s the reason we have cameras built into our phones, and it’s the reason we’re so addicted to social media. The addition of cameras to our mobiles means that these platforms can provide us with instant gratification. Within a few moments, you can snap something, post it and instantly start seeing likes roll in.

As a young woman, this was really important to me.

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Wedding Photography vs. Videography: Pros and Cons


This post is by Dan Kumieko from PetaPixel


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So you’re about to shoot someone’s wedding. That’s amazing — it’s an incredible opportunity to be part of one of the most intimate and beautiful experiences in human love. But between photography and videography, which medium gets the job done?

I’m the co-owner of CineStory Films, a Los Angeles-based wedding video and photo service, and we specialize in both mediums. We have professionals who opt for video and others who choose photo to get the best results. Here are the pros and cons of both photography and videography.

Comfort and Experience

While it’s important to keep your clients in

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Photo Essay: Cashmere Crisis Looms in Himalayan Ice Desert


This post is by Andrew Newey from PetaPixel


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Location: Changthang Plateau, Ladakh, Kashmir – December 2019. At an altitude of more than 14,000ft, where winter temperatures can fall to -40 degrees, it is hard to believe anyone or anything can survive in this vast ice desert that is the Changthang Plateau.

Situated between the Himalayan and Karakorum mountain ranges, it is the highest permanently inhabited plateau in the world and home to an extremely hardy and rare breed of goat—the Changra, or Pashmina goat. The high altitude, freezing temperatures and harsh bitter winds in this unforgiving mountainous region are essential to stimulate the growth of the goats’ super-soft

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Shooting the Aurora Out of an Airplane Window


This post is by Andy Luten from PetaPixel


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Andy here, checking in from cloudy and chilly London. Here for work for a week or so but had a pretty epic flight over, as you’ll see in a second. I had a few friends with systemwide upgrades expiring on American Airlines soon and they were generous enough to upgrade me to business class for the flight over.

Ok, some prerequisites here: as a photographer I know that October-March is Northern Lights season. Knowing this, and knowing there are no clouds at 36,000 feet, I picked seat 12A on the American 777-300ER, knowing it would give me a good view

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Wedding Photography Pricing Myths Exposed


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


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Wedding photographer Taylor Jackson recently took on what he’s calling “wedding photography pricing myths.” In a 30-minute video, Jackson tackles some of the most common tips, advice, and outright myths that he found online, setting the record straight for beginners who want to get into this business.

Jackson didn’t initially set out to “expose” wedding photography pricing myths.

“I wanted to do a beginner pricing video, and I started looking at all of the information that was out there that people were probably learning from,” he explains. “And it turns out, I found a lot of it to be

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Adobe, This is Why Photographers Are Hating on You


This post is by Adam Marsh from PetaPixel


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Photographer Usman Dawood recently published an article in defense of Adobe. Reading it was a lot like reading a Microsoft fanboy at the height of the Window Vista era — sure, the product works, but at what level of financial cost and frustration?

“Over the last few years, it seems like it’s become really cool to hate Adobe; kind of like how it’s cool to hate Coldplay,” Dawood wrote. “Except the main difference is that Coldplay really does suck.”

Now, nothing against Coldplay, but people’s livelihoods don’t rely on Coldplay. They’re reliant on how Adobe sets its prices and

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