The Pros and Cons of Syndicating Your Photos


This post is by Christopher Boffoli from PetaPixel


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For a while now, I’ve wanted to cover the topic of syndication as it was a major factor in my work gaining widespread exposure and for the full-time career that I have now as a fine art, commercial, and editorial photographer.

I had no knowledge of the world of syndication at the time I was approached by an editor with an offer to promote my work that way. So maybe there will be something in my experience that will be value-added to other photographers who might be considering syndication of their images.

I sometimes speak with photography students at art

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What I Learned from Seeing ‘The Eye of Sauron’ in My Night Sky Photo


This post is by Serafeim Zormpas from PetaPixel


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Roughly two years ago, I bought my first decent DSLR camera. I was overprotective, cleaning every bit of dust I could see and adding extra padding in my bag to avoid any possible accidents whenever I carried it around.

After being in photography for a while and going through every single tutorial I could lay my hands upon, I discovered the magic of astrophotography.

Astrophotography can be so mesmerizing, and it doesn’t take much to get hooked. After a week of intense research, I knew the fundamentals of what was needed to take a decent nighttime picture.

  1. Go as far

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A Digital Landscape Photographer’s Introduction to Film


This post is by Michael Strickland from PetaPixel


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I am constantly asked questions about how I started and how to start shooting film. So, here we go! This guide is intended to be a story of my introduction to film as a landscape photographer, provide some tips, introductions, and guidance, but in no means is it intended to be a foolproof method of how to shoot film.

Film is a path that’s unique for everyone and is definitely not for everyone, so be prepared for failures and having some trial and error. That’s part of the process!

My introduction to film was very simple. About 7 years ago,

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The Terrible History of Photographs, Sesame Street-Style


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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It has never been easier to shoot and share photos than in our modern Instagram age. The YouTube puppet web series Glove and Boots made this tongue-in-cheek 5-minute video on the “terrible history of photographs” to explain how much time and effort it took to do photography in past eras.

Back in 2012, Glove and Boots also shared this humorous tutorial on how to use Photoshop layers.

A Day in the Life of a Kiwi Police Officer Photographer


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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The Auckland, New Zealand police department posted this interesting 9-minute behind-the-scenes video that shows a day in the life of a Kiwi Police Photographer.

The video follows a photographer named Rhonda, who shows us the ins and outs of what a typical day looks like as a member of the Police Photography Section.

There are three cars in the department that are dedicated to photography gear — the trunk contains each photographer’s Canon 5D camera kit, accessories, and other items the photographers might need in the field (e.g. crime scene number placards).

The photographers wear plain clothes, but they

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Man’s $1,998 Camera Fried by Self-Driving Car Laser


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Self-driving cars widely use a technology called lidar (which stands for light detection and ranging) to “see” the world using laser pulses. These lasers are designed to be safe to human eyes, but it seems they may not always be safe for cameras. A man at CES in Las Vegas says that a car-mounted lidar permanently damaged the sensor in his new $1,998 Sony a7R II mirrorless camera.

Ars Technica reports that Ridecell autonomous vehicle engineer Jit Ray Chowdhur had been photographing a self-driving car that was using a lidar system developed by AEye.

He was then horrified to find

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This is Leica’s Official Sensor Cleaning Process


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Want to see how Leica does its official digital camera sensor cleanings? Here’s a 20-minute video that steps through the process.

Leica Society member Hari Subramanyam shot the video after taking his Leica M (Typ 240) and Leica SL to Leica Camera AG for its sensor cleaning service. Customer service technician Michel Razafimahefa demonstrates the tools and techniques used whenever a photographer drops off their gear.

We see Razafimahefa clearing out dust before the shutter is opened, using the Leica M’s dust detection feature, removing dust with the rubber and sticky pad from a Pentax sensor cleaning kit, and

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What Parallelism Is and How to Use it to Improve Your Photography


This post is by Samuel Zeller from PetaPixel


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I’ve always had a fascination with geometry and man-made structures, their perfection has a strong attraction on me. It took me time to realize that what I appreciated most wasn’t necessarily their symmetry or the simple repetition of shapes but the parallelism between the various elements of the construction of an image.

To better understand what parallelism is, you first need to deconstruct photography and bring it back to its essence. A photograph is light, shapes and colors (or tones, if we speak about black and white photography). Those are the visual blocks that form a photograph. Sometimes there are

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How is Photography Affecting Us?


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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In the past two decades, most people went from not carrying a camera to always having a smartphone camera with them at all times. With millions upon millions of photos shot (and shared) every single day, how is this explosion in photography affecting us? Here’s a 10-minute video by WIRED that explores that question.

To find out how photos are affecting our eyes, brains, and bodies, WIRED Senior Editor Peter Rubin looks into how selfies distort our self-perception, shoots with a professional photographer, and examines how photos impact moods and memory.

A study published in 2018 found that selfies captured

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What You Need to Know About Flickr Pro’s Adobe Discount


This post is by Mattias Hedberg from PetaPixel


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My name is Mattias Hedberg, and I’m a photographer based in Norrköping, Sweden. I was recently about to get the Flickr Pro upgrade and was hovering above the buy button when I decided to take a deeper look at the Adobe offer since it sounded a little too good. I was interested in other features of the plan also, but the Adobe one was very tempting.

Get 15% off Creative Cloud, Adobe’s impressive suite of creative apps that includes Lightroom and Photoshop.

I could not find any information about this offer on Flickr except this blurb. There’s nothing in

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A Brief History of B&H, The Largest Non-Chain Camera Store in the US


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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The camera superstore B&H Photo Video is the largest non-chain camera store in the United States and one of the (if not the) largest in the world. The store made this 1.5-minute video that tells the story of how the juggernaut of the industry came to be.

B&H was born over 45 years ago, back in 1973, as a “mom and pop” camera store in the Tribeca neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It took its name from its husband-and-wife co-founders Blimie and Herman, who originally had a single employee.

Over the decades, B&H grew and grew, and

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How This Pro Instagram Star Earns Up to $100K Climbing Peaks Full-Time


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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The rise of Instagram in our culture has spawned a generation of professional Instagrammers who make a living from broadcasting (often sponsored) photos to their massive followings. Meghan Young is one such Instagrammer, and this 12-minute feature by Bloomberg gives us a look into what her life and career are like.

The 33-year-old Young spends her time climbing mountains and sharing views of her adventures with her audience.

Dropping Photojournalists Also Drops Photo Quality, Study Finds


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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A number of prominent newspapers and magazines have laid off some or all of their photojournalists in recent years, but these moves are not without their consequences. A new study has found that switching from a photojournalist staff to non-professional photos has, to no one’s surprise, causes a significant drop in photo quality.

Professors Tara Mortensen and Peter Gade of the University of South Carolina and the University of Oklahoma, respectively, recently published the results of the study in an article titled, “Does Photojournalism Matter? News Image Content and Presentation in the Middletown (NY) Times Herald-Record Before and After

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The Story of How Top Photographers Posed for Baseball Cards in 1974


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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In the mid-1970s, 134 of the top photographers and curators in the world of photography posed for an unusual set of baseball cards that now sell for thousands of dollars as a complete set. The SF Museum of Modern Art just released this 4-minute video in which photographer Mike Mandel shares the story of how these cards came to be.

When Mandel was studying photography in the early 1970s, photographers didn’t receive much attention compared to artists working in other mediums, but things were starting to change. As a baseball fan, Mandel decided to poke fun at the fact that

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The Basics of Equivalent Exposure in Photography


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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The concept of equivalent exposure can be a tricky one to wrap your mind around when you’re just getting started in photography. Photography enthusiast and animator Vincent Ledvina of Apalapse made this helpful 5.5-minute video that explains it in a simple and visual way.

“I made this video because equivalent exposures are something every photographer either needs to know for a photography course (like me) or wants to know to learn how to change settings on the fly,” Ledvina says. “Knowledge of how camera settings relate to one another is important in photography, especially when you graduate from auto

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Shooting Portraits with Colored Shadows


This post is by Matt Doheny from PetaPixel


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Finding new ways to create isn’t always easy, so you have to keep your eyes open for inspiration. One day while making my way down the rabbit hole of YouTube, I stumbled across a video. These guys had created 3 colored shadows off this pencil while keeping a perfectly white background. What in the world was this sorcery? Turns out it wasn’t sorcery, it was science.

As my curiosity started to rise I noticed something else did as well — it was inspiration.

Being a portrait/fashion photographer here in Downtown Los Angeles, I thought to myself “what a great series

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How NASA’s Iconic ‘Earthrise’ Photo Was Shot


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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“Earthrise” is an iconic photo of Earth rising up from the Moon’s horizon that’s considered one of the most important environmental photos ever made. Here’s a fascinating 3-minute visualization by NASA that recreates how the photo was shot in real-time.

In December 1968, Apollo 8 crew members Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William (Bill) Anders became the first humans to leave Earth and travel to another body in space. While orbiting the Moon and photographing the lunar surface on December 24th, the astronauts suddenly spotted the Earthrise.

Here’s how the conversation unfolded:

Anders: Oh my God! Look at that

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I Shot Ultra-Macro Video of the Wet Plate Collodion Process


This post is by Markus Hofstaetter from PetaPixel


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Normally I use videos to document my work. This time the video is the main outcome of my work — I shot an ultra-macro video that shows how the crystals/salts change during the wet plate collodion process.

I did this project because I got asked a lot about how the process works. Questions like “what happens during fixing?” or “what changes when the tintype runs dry?” and so on. As you can imagine, I tried to explain every aspect of this process, but a picture is worth a thousand words. That’s the reason for this video.

What I

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How to Use the World’s Largest Polaroid Camera


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Back in its heyday, Polaroid made seven 20×24-inch instant cameras, and only six of them are known to exist today. Marco Christian Krenn of Analog Things recently paid a visit to the camera found at Supersense in Vienna. In this 10-minute video, Krenn shows how this ultra-rare camera is used.

We get to see the chemistry pods and finely-tuned rollers in the processor, which, unlike mainstream Polaroid cameras, is separate from the camera itself.

The camera weighs over 235 pounds (107kg), and its film holder is huge.

After setting up some studio lighting, Krenn shoots a portrait using the

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It Costs $150,000+ to Send This Nikon DSLR Kit to the ISS


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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The astronauts onboard the International Space Station get new cameras delivered from time to time — 10 Nikon D5s arrived in late 2017 after NASA ordered 55 of them. But did you know that it’s extremely expensive to stock the ISS astronauts’ camera arsenal? That camera kit you see above cost at least $150,000 to send to the space station.

This past weekend, German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst Tweeted photos of himself giving Russian cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev a haircut in the Zvezda Service Module. That service module is where the station’s Nikon gear is mounted to the walls, so Gerst’s

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