Why Won’t the ’72dpi’ Myth Die?


This post is by David Garnick from PetaPixel


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When they were young, my children used to get very excited about Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny. But they saw through those by the time they were six. So why has the myth of saving JPEG files at 72dpi lasted far more than six years?

I see it everywhere: instructions to save and submit files at 72dpi (dots per inch). Major international competitions, grant programs, and online publications specify that submitted images must be 72dpi. It makes no sense now, and it never did.

Decades ago computer screens commonly had 72ppi (pixels per inch)—as opposed to the roughly 200

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How an Anti-Aliasing Filter Impacts a Camera’s Photos


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Some cameras on the market these days leave out the traditional optical low pass filter (OLPF), also known as the anti-aliasing filter, to increase sharpness at the expense of increase moiré patterns. If you’re not sure what exactly this trade-off is, check out this 10-minute comparison video by New Zealand-based wedding photographer Richard Wong.

Wong shot the same scenes using the Panasonic S1 and Panasonic S1H full-frame mirrorless cameras. While both cameras contain 24.2MP sensors, the S1H — a video-centric camera — contains an optical low pass filter while the S1 leaves it out.

Zooming into the same areas

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Wedding Photography vs. Videography: Pros and Cons


This post is by Dan Kumieko from PetaPixel


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So you’re about to shoot someone’s wedding. That’s amazing — it’s an incredible opportunity to be part of one of the most intimate and beautiful experiences in human love. But between photography and videography, which medium gets the job done?

I’m the co-owner of CineStory Films, a Los Angeles-based wedding video and photo service, and we specialize in both mediums. We have professionals who opt for video and others who choose photo to get the best results. Here are the pros and cons of both photography and videography.

Comfort and Experience

While it’s important to keep your clients in

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Why Umbrellas are the Most Under-Appreciated Lighting Modifier


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


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In this short tutorial, well-known portrait and fashion photographer Lindsay Adler will show you how to use “the most inexpensive and under-appreciated” lighting modifier to capture beautiful studio portraits. She’s talking, of course, about the lowly umbrella.

“For years and year I hated the entire category of umbrella modifiers, and that’s because I didn’t understand them,” says Adler. “Nowadays I don’t just like umbrellas, I love them, and I love them for three important reasons.”

Those reasons are portability, affordability, and versatility, which Adler goes through one by one in the video before explaining the three most common ways

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9 Simple Tips for Taking Better Photos of Waterfalls


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


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Landscape photographer and YouTuber Mads Peter Iversen has released a helpful on-location tutorial for anybody who wants to photograph waterfalls. The beginner-focused tutorial runs you through 9 simple tips that will help you take better, more deliberate photos of this common landscape photography subject.

To shoot the tutorial, Iversen hiked to two beautiful waterfalls during a trip to the Lofoten archipelago in Norway, taking viewers along for the ride as he crafts each composition and offering some tips along the way.

It’s important to note that this isn’t a tutorial for advanced landscape photographer, though some enthusiast shooters might benefit

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11 Secrets to Up Your Night Street Photography Game


This post is by Simon Ellingworth from PetaPixel


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I’m going to share with you 11 secrets that will help you up your night street photography game. These tips are based on what I teach paying customers on my London Soho Night Street Photography workshops, but don’t worry if you’re coming to one, I have many more secrets!

I love the way cities come to life at night, with neon lights, the sound of laughter, street lights, reflections, shop windows. It’s a different world, for which I’ll equip you to not only shoot, but to shoot well. Before you ask, all of the images here are shot handheld

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Quick Tip: How to Use the ‘Dark Mode’ Photo Editing Technique


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


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Pye Jirsa over at SLR Lounge wants to flip your portrait editing workflow upside down. In his latest tutorial, Jirsa shows off a technique he calls “Dark Mode” that creates a moody, dramatic look in just a couple of very simple steps.

The tutorial focuses specifically on Adobe Lightroom, but it’s possible in any RAW photo editing program. Basically, Jirsa wants you to think about adjusting the exposure parameters of your images—specifically portraits—a totally different way.

Instead of flattening out the image by going in and adjusting your Whites, Highlights, Shadows and Blacks right away, he starts by dropping the

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Does Photographing a Moment Steal the Experience From You?


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Countless photographs are snapped every day by people looking to preserve their life’s experiences, but is the incessant picture taking actually robbing us of them? Travel photographer and writer Erin Sullivan recently gave this interesting 8-minute TED Talk on the subject.

In growing her popular Instagram account, Sullivan was interested and amused by how many similar photos she found online of the same places she visited and captured.

And after going to famous landmarks and seeing people get out of their cars, snap a photo of the location with their phones, and then get right back into their vehicles,

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Here’s a 2020 Celestial Calendar for Astrophotographers


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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If you’re getting into astrophotography, the telescope manufacturer Celestron has published a helpful “celestial calendar” to give you a heads up of notable things you’ll see in the night sky through the end of 2020.

The calendar contains events like eclipses, supermoons, and planet oppositions. Each event has a date, description, and information on where on Earth they’ll be visible from.

A detailed calendar and guide can be found on the company’s blog, but there’s also a downloadable compact poster version of the calendar that could look great on your wall.

If you’re looking for info on how to

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Explaining Color Space and How It Can Screw Up Your Photos After Export


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


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If you’re new to digital photo editing you’ve probably had this experience: you export a perfectly edited photo, but the JPEG looks all “wrong”—the colors are totally different! Actually, they not. As Unmesh Dinda from PiXimperfect explains, you just haven’t sorted out your color space properly.

Seasoned photographers and Photoshop users are well-aware of color space, but almost all of us made this mistake as a beginner. The issue, as Dinda explains in the video above, is that you probably exported your photo without first converting it to the most common and widely-supported color space: sRGB.

The three main color

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What’s Your Rangefinder’s Effective Base Length?


This post is by Johnny Martyr from PetaPixel


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Looking to buy your first rangefinder? Here’s a tip: start with the lenses! Effective Base Length, or EBL, is often left with little or no consideration by SLR shooters looking for their first interchangeable lens rangefinder.

Review after review will sing praises of a bright viewfinder, numerous (or lack of) framelines and a plethora of other features that are more on the mind of SLR shooters (like shutter speed range, light meter, and loading).

Those are all important, but the thing that I don’t think that many photographers grasp is that one must choose their rangefinder based first on what

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Film Scanning Shootout: Drum Scan vs Flatbed vs DSLR


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


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Film photographer, educator and YouTuber Nick Carver doesn’t shoot digital, but he does scan his film for printing. So he recently embarked on an experiment to figure out which scanning technique is best: drum scanning, fluid mount flatbed scanning, or scanning your film using a DSLR and macro lens.

First things first: this is a long video, and that’s a good thing. Carver went in-depth for this comparison, but he’s also published a helpful Table of Contents (below) in case you want to skip around. If you don’t care about the methodology, the results start around the 15-minute mark, where

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Crash Course: Learn 20 Different Couples Poses in Under 10 Minutes


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


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Pye Jirsa over at SLR Lounge recently teamed up with Adorama to create a helpful series of tutorials called Mastering Your Craft, and in the most recent installment, he’ll try to teach you 20+ couple’s poses in under 10 minutes.

This is actually Part II of Pye’s “foundation posing crash course.” In Part I, he covered the 5 “foundation” poses you should learn first: V-Up, Closed Pose, Open Pose, Reversed Pose, and Stacked Pose. You can learn all about those here.

In Part II, he expands these five foundational poses into a “system” that will allow you to

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How Polaroid Pioneered the Instant Photography Revolution


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Photography has never been faster to made and share than in our modern “insta” era, but over half a century ago, it was American scientist Edwin Land and his company Polaroid that helped the industry take a giant step forward in speed and ease. PBS NewsHour just aired this 5-minute segment that looks at Polaroid’s history and influence.

PBS paid a visit to MIT, which is currently running a traveling exhibition titled “The Polaroid Project: At the Intersection of Art and Technology.”

Edwin Land first conceived of an instant camera back in 1943 and then launched a top-secret

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That Camera Bundle on Amazon May Be Gear That Was Returned


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Here’s a 16-minute report by CNBC that looks into how Amazon returns work. At the 14:39 mark, there’s an interesting tidbit that you may not have known: when you see third-party camera bundles on Amazon with a body, lens, and/or accessories, many of those items may have been previously returned.

In addition to reselling returned items through its Amazon Warehouse program, donating them, or returning them to suppliers, Amazon also sells returned items in bulk to third-party companies. Those companies then repackage them, sometimes with added accessories, and then sell them for a profit back on Amazon.

The example

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A Simple and Inexpensive Schlieren Optical System Using a Fresnel Lens


This post is by Ted Kinsman from PetaPixel


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Schlieren imaging is a fairly standard optical technique for visualizing heat, sound, or pressure differences in air. Technically, a schlieren system is able to see clear disturbances in air due to slight differences in the speed of light in the air. The technique can be sensitive enough to see the heat rising off a human hand at room temperature.

High-quality schlieren systems typically use large optical mirrors that are expensive and beyond the budget of most optics classes. Here I will present the simplest design for a system that any student can build, align, and experiment with.

This simple design

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Don’t Get Burned by Fake Camera Gear, This Video Warns


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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A couple of years ago, Canon USA and the National Crime Prevention Council launched a contest called “Stop Fakes” to raise public awareness about the dangers of using counterfeit power accessories. This 26-second video by Anthony Pegg was selected as the winner.

“The contest was created to help promote awareness around the safety risks of using counterfeit power accessories, such as batteries, chargers, and external flashes, as well as how to avoid counterfeit products,” Canon says. “Entrants were asked to create an original video demonstrating their creative interpretation of one or more of 10 anti-counterfeit tips.”

Here are the

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How I Use My GoPro Cameras for Landscape and Travel Photography


This post is by Shreenivasan Manievannan from PetaPixel


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As a landscape and travel photographer with more than a decade of experience, I always found myself carrying a ton of gear. With huge wide-angle and telephoto lenses, multiple DSLR camera bodies, heavy-duty tripods, and occasionally drones in my backpack, my mobility while trekking to locations was often limited. However, things changed dramatically in 2016 when I started working at GoPro and discovered its amazing cameras.

Some of the key features which I love about the cameras are the ability to shoot in RAW format for photos, super wide-angle lenses, foolproof infinite focus, very short hyperfocal distance, pre-stitched 360 photos,

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5 Primary Light Patterns and Their Purposes


This post is by Pye Jirsa from PetaPixel


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In this 8.5-minute video, we’ll explain the 5 primary key light patterns and the ‘why’ or purpose behind each of them. It’s all about “key” or main light positions and namely, understanding the why or purpose behind each one of these 5 primary lighting patterns.

Keep in mind that we can find each of these lighting patterns using natural light, or we can create them in the studio. First, let’s look at a little slide from the SLR Lounge workshop Lighting 1.

We’re going to go over the details in just a moment, but, for now, all I want

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Low Contrast Lens Filters: What They are and Why You Should Use Them


This post is by Jake Hicks from PetaPixel


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As the name of the filter alludes to, these lens filters do indeed lower the overall contrast of a shot. To clarify what that means in relation to photography: these filters will reduce the darkness of the shadows by allowing light to bleed into them from surrounding highlights.

From the example images below, you should get a very good idea of what the low contrast filters do:

Both of these example images are taken with exactly the same camera settings and are displayed straight out of camera. So although they’re shot with the same settings, the image with the low

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