The Story Behind That Viral ‘Distracted Boyfriend’ Meme Photo

One of the hottest memes this year is the “Distracted Boyfriend,” also known as “Man Looking at Other Woman.” It shows a man looking backward, checking out another woman while his partner gives him a disapproving look. The photo emerged in memes earlier in 2017 before going extremely viral and peaking in August. If you spend a lot of time on the Internet, there’s a good chance you’ve seen this meme in one form or another. Here’s one example of the meme geared towards photographers: A look at the Google Trends chart shows how the meme absolutely blew up
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Why Focus by Wire Systems in Camera Lenses Suck

“Focus by wire” is a system found in many camera lenses these days. Here’s a 9-minute video by TheCameraStoreTV that takes a look at what “focus by wire” is and some reasons it isn’t that great. When you’re turning that focus ring on a mirrorless lens, you’re actually sending a signal back to the camera motor telling it how to move the elements of the lens itself. Normally, you’d expect the focus ring to move those elements directly (i.e. physically). The problem seems to be that it’s never consistent with where it focuses for a particular position on the
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Why Your Phone Shoots 4K But Your Camera Still Doesn’t

The new iPhone will shoot 4K at 60 fps and 1080p at 240 fps. But why is it that smartphones seem to be shooting “better” video resolution than most “serious” cameras? In this 8-minute video, Max Yuryev looks into the technical reasons behind this. It seems to boil down to the fact that the CPUs inside many cameras aren’t good enough to handle such high-speed video. In smartphones, the processor is “insanely powerful,” and it enables them to deal with that massive amount of information at 240 frames per second. So why don’t they just put bigger processors inside cameras?
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Why Your Phone Shoots 4K But Your Camera Still Doesn’t

The new iPhone will shoot 4K at 60 fps and 1080p at 240 fps. But why is it that smartphones seem to be shooting “better” video resolution than most “serious” cameras? In this 8-minute video, Max Yuryev looks into the technical reasons behind this. It seems to boil down to the fact that the CPUs inside many cameras aren’t good enough to handle such high-speed video. In smartphones, the processor is “insanely powerful,” and it enables them to deal with that massive amount of information at 240 frames per second. So why don’t they just put bigger processors inside cameras?
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This is How the Leica M10 is Made

Want to see how Leica’s cameras are made these days? Photographer Richard Seymour made this 4-minute video that provides a beautiful look at how the new Leica M10 is built in Wetzlar, Germany. Leica writes that the M10 is exclusively put together by Leica specialists at the company’s factory in Wetzlar using 1,100 individual components. These parts include 30 brass-milled components, 126 screws, and 17 optical elements. After the top and base plates are milled from solid blocks of metal, workers spend 40 minutes grinding and polishing them by hand. Here are some still frames from the video that show
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8-Bit vs 16-Bit Photos: Here’s What the Difference Is

More bits are better, right? But do you really know the difference between 8-bit and 16-bit images? Photo educator Nathaniel Dodson breaks it down for us in this informative 8-minute video for his channel tutvid. As Dodson explains, a greater bit depth means that you have more room to push and pull colors and tones before you start seeing artifacts like banding in your image. If you are shooting in JPEG you’re limiting your bit depth to 8-bit, which gives you 256 levels of color and tone to play with. RAW images can be anywhere from 12 to 16 bit,
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Film vs. Digital: Let’s Put It to the Test

Have you ever heard the argument that digital just doesn’t have the same look as film? Well, let’s put that argument to rest. I have painstakingly made my own Lightroom preset that I believe is 96% the same as my favorite film, Kodak Tri-X 400. Now, this preset is custom made for my camera specifically. So let’s dive a little deeper into how I accomplished this preset and put all those subjective arguments to rest.

First, The Setup

First off, I had to get my Kodak Tri-X film as close as I possibly could to the digital equivalent. In order
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An Ultimate Guide to Every B&W ISO 400 35mm Film on the Market

I’m photographer Andrew Branch, and this is my 400 speed, 35mm black-and-white film guide. In this guide, I will be comparing every 400 ISO black and white film which is actively being produced and readily available to the U.S. market, that I know about. Before we get into it, you should know that I am a film enthusiast, but a novice in every sense of the word. Experienced film shooters will likely find my film review a bit naive and maybe insufficient. That’s fine, I’m not doing this for them. I’m making this guide because I haven’t found anything
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Go Inside the Darkroom of Legendary Photographer Edward Weston

Want to see where and how one of the legends of photography processed their photos? Here’s a 14-minute video that takes us on a tour of Edward Weston’s darkroom (note: there’s brief nudity). After visiting Weston’s home with his grandson Kim Weston, photographer Marc Silber of Advancing Your Photography then stepped into the inner sanctum where so many of Weston’s iconic prints were made. “Take a step back in time into Edward Weston’s darkroom, and then come forward with us to get a tour of it from his grandson Kim Weston,” AYP writes. “Hear secrets of how he developed
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Photos and Color Profiles: The Quickly Approaching Move to Wide-Gamut

My name is Kelly Thompson, and I’m a VP at 500px. Buried in Tuesday’s announcement of Google’s Android Oreo was an interesting tidbit for photographers: like Apple the year before, Google’s mobile OS has been reworked to support deep and wide color, and, for the first time, full color management for Android devices. What does this mean for photographers and their workflows? It’s probably a good time to review your processes to make sure you’re getting the best possible results for the widest audience. At 500px, we’ve made some significant changes to better support the amazing new screens, while also
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Photo Studio Polyboards and Thrifty Alternatives

Nearly every professional studio I’ve ever used has these “polyboards” and you‘ve probably even seen them yourself but may not have known what they’re used for. Polyboards are polystyrene boards that usually measure 4 feet wide by 8 feet high and are normally 2 inches thick. One of the other defining characteristics is that they are often white on one side and black on the other. This dual color is very important as this gives them two key uses. The white side is used for bouncing light back into the shadows of an image, for example, a light would be
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This Eclipse Photo Shows the Power of Shooting RAW

Here’s an eye-opening example that shows the power of shooting RAW. Photographer Dan Plucinski captured a beautiful photo of the solar eclipse yesterday, and this is the before-and-after comparison showing the straight-out-of-camera image (on left) compared to the edited one (on right). Plucinski got to the location in Oregon at 6am and set up for his shot. During totality, Plucinski shot exposure bracketed photos using his Nikon D750. This photo was captured without a filter at f/11, 1/8s, and ISO 100: But this photo didn’t accurately capture what the human eye could see. To correct that, Plucinski did some minimal
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This is How Shooting the Sun Can Melt Your Camera

Planning to photograph the upcoming solar eclipse? You’d better make sure you have the right solar filter to protect your camera. Here’s a 2-minute video that shows how shooting the sun without protection can completely melt your DSLR’s guts. The folks over at Every Photo Store in Dubuque, Iowa, decided to do a test to see what unprotected solar photography can do to a camera. They mounted an old Canon Rebel XT (AKA 350D) to a $10,000 Canon 400mm f/2.8 IS II lens, pointed it up at the sun, and watched to see what would happen. With the mirror
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AI Can Easily Erase Photo Watermarks: Here’s How to Protect Yours

Happy that your photos are safe online hidden behind aggressive watermarking? Maybe it’s time to reconsider. New Google research shows that a lot of watermarks, including those used by major stock websites, can be easily removed automatically by computers. But there’s a way to prevent it. Using clever AI algorithms, it’s possible for a computer to zero in on the exact watermark and remove it from a photo as if it was rubbing away a smudge. Here are a couple examples Google shared using stock photos: The news was disclosed in a paper, titled “On The Effectiveness Of Visible
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What Newspaper Photojournalists Get to Shoot in the Course of a Month

My name is Robin Roots and I’m a photojournalist for Õhtuleht, one of the largest newspapers in the small country of Estonia. Our team of five photographers has to write down every trip we do with a company car. I was looking over our trips from last month and thought that perhaps others would like to know what we newspaper photojournalists do on a daily basis. This list is only a small part of the assignments we were given, but it’s a good snapshot of what we get to shoot over the course of just one month.

What Newspaper Photojournalists Get to Shoot in the Course of a Month

My name is Robin Roots and I’m a photojournalist for Õhtuleht, one of the largest newspapers in the small country of Estonia. Our team of five photographers has to write down every trip we do with a company car. I was looking over our trips from last month and thought that perhaps others would like to know what we newspaper photojournalists do on a daily basis. This list is only a small part of the assignments we were given, but it’s a good snapshot of what we get to shoot over the course of just one month.

The Woman Who Invented Robert Capa

Gerta Pohorylle was born in 1910 in Stuttgart, from a middle-class Jewish Galician family. She attended a Swiss boarding school, where she learned English and French and grew up receiving a secular education. In spite of her bourgeois origins, she became part of socialist and labor movements while still very young. At the age of 19, she and her family moved to Leipzig, just before the affirmation of the German Nazi party. Gerta immediately showed her dislike and opposition to the regime, joining leftist groups and taking an active part in anti-Nazi propaganda activities. In 1933, she was arrested and
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The Masterful Photo Compositions of Henri Cartier-Bresson

Ever wonder what it is that makes Henri Cartier-Bresson’s “decisive moment” photos “work”? Photographer Tavis Leaf Glover put out a two-part video series in which he explores Cartier-Bresson’s famous photos and shows how they conform to various ideas and principles of composition. These videos show “how Henri Cartier-Bresson used dynamic symmetry, or geometry, in his photography,” Glover writes. “I’ll talk in depth about many composition and design techniques he used in some of his best work.”
Glover’s exploration goes well beyond the popular Rule of Thirds and Golden Ratio — Glover teaches concepts such as Dynamic Symmetry, Root Rectangles,
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This Famous Pepper Photo by Edward Weston Was a 4hr+ Exposure at f/240

Edward Weston is considered to be one of the most influential American photographers of the 20th century. One of his most famous works, titled Pepper No. 30, is a B&W photo of a single green pepper with beautiful, soft lighting. Here’s a fascinating, little-known fact about the piece: it was shot at an aperture of f/240 with an exposure time of 4-6 hours. Photographer Marc Silber of Advancing Your Photography was recently given a tour of Weston’s home in Carmel, California, by Edward’s grandson, photographer Kim Weston. While discussing his grandfather’s life and work, Kim shared the interesting exposure
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A Forgotten Solution to the Problems of Zoom Lenses

For a few years now, I’ve had in my collection one very strange lens. I bought it primarily for its value as a collectible so, up until now, I haven’t really spent much time playing with it. Made in 1975, this manual focus Minolta MC Rokkor-X 40-80mm f/2.8 lens is one strange puppy. When it was first introduced, no other zoom lens could top its image quality and it really didn’t have much competition until more recent years. This is largely due to its very unique gearbox design that sought to overcome the problem with zoom lenses that we
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