This Photographer Captures Chicago’s Skyline as an ‘Urban Quilt’

For the past few years, Chicago-based photographer Angie McMonigal has been working on a project titled Urban Quilt. Her goal is to capture her city’s buildings as a patchwork of colors, textures, and materials. “I don’t just see individual buildings standing there as imposing towers of steel,” McMonigal says. “I see a patchwork. Different colors, different textures, different materials, different architectural styles, all pieced together.” “Some patches are pristine and new, others a little more worn. There are iconic patterns, immediately recognizable, and also bits that are hard to identify, fragments that feel familiar but are hard to place.
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The Photographer Who Shoots Wildlife in European Cities

Bristol, UK-based Sam Hobson is a wildlife photographer with a difference from others: he primarily shoots wildlife that he can find in and around cities: foxes, badgers, deer, toads, squirrels, herons, ravens, pigeons, goshawks, falcons, gulls and others. “Working with what’s on my doorstep has tons of benefits,” Hobson tells PetaPixel. “Getting to know my subject is probably the most important element of my photography. Shooting close to home means I can regularly visit the same locations, work with the same animals and really get to know the habits and routines of my local wildlife.” “Shooting the same
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Pete Souza On Photographing a Fake President for “House of Cards”

For eight years, Pete Souza served as White House Chief Photographer for President Barack Obama. During that time, not only did he take arguably the most complete photographic record of a president, he also played a role in rolling out the White House Flickr feed (now archived) and Instagram account (@obamawhitehouse). A number of end-of-term retrospectives helped… The post Pete Souza On Photographing a Fake President for “House of Cards” appeared first on PhotoShelter Blog.

Photographing the ‘Great Migration’ in Tanzania

Tanzania is one of the best places in the world to see nature and wildlife as it has been for thousands of years. The 947,303 square kilometer country holds some of the most famous national parks and nature reserves in the world with diverse landscapes and dense population of wildlife like the Serengeti and Ngorongoro crater. One of the most famous nature phenomenon Tanzania is known for is “The Great Migration,” a huge annual movement of approximately 1.5 million wildebeest, accompanied by several hundreds of thousands of zebras and other antelopes, the largest overland migration in the world with
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Whoa: Put a Camera Under a Running Faucet for a ‘Water Tunnel’ Effect

Here’s an interesting effect you can capture in-camera without any digital trickery: place a waterproof camera directly under a running faucet. The camera can look up through the stream of water at the aerator, and the resulting footage looks like you’re traveling through a tunnel of water. “Camera under a running tap = Water tunnel,” writes YouTube user digi47. “Didn’t realise it would create such a cool effect.” (via digi47 via Laughing Squid)

New Online Archive Lets You Explore the First 100 Years of European Photos

Europeana.eu has launched a searchable online gallery of more than 2 million historical photographs, which catalog the first 100 years of photography in Europe. The gallery is a brilliant resource for those interested in historical photography, including important work by pioneers like Julia Margaret Cameron, Eadweard Muybridge and Louis Daguerre.
‘Loya. Valley of the Yosemite. (The Sentinel)’, Muybridge, Eadweard, c. 1867 – c. 1872
Over 50 European institutions from 34 countries have contributed photographs to the collection, which were sourced from photographic archives, agencies and museum collections across Europe.
Panoramic view of Innsbruck with snowy mountain peaks, anonymous, c.
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Natural Light vs Off Camera Flash: Two Photographers Shoot the Same Model

Photographers Francisco Hernandez and Vanessa Tellez recently did an experiment: photographing the same model, Hernandez used an off camera flash and Tellez used natural light to see how their styles and results differ. You can watch the shootout in the 5-minute video above. Here are some of the resulting photos of model Alexis Pinkerton:

Natural Light

Off Camera Flash

Natural Light

Off Camera Flash

Natural Light

Off Camera Flash

Natural Light

Off Camera Flash

Natural Light

Off Camera Flash

Natural Light

Off Camera Flash

Natural Light

Off Camera Flash

Natural Light

Off Camera Flash

Natural Light

Off Camera Flash

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Creating a Conceptual Photo of the Full Moon Getting Swapped In

Conceptual photographer Erik Johansson created this beautiful and surreal image titled “Full Moon Service,” showing a couple of workers swapping in a full moon to maintain the lunar phases. Johansson has also released a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at how the project was done, from concept to final shot. Here’s the 3-minute behind-the-scenes video:
The project was done in the late summer of 2016. It all started with a sketch of what Johansson wanted to create. After creating many of the props used in the shoot (e.g. spray painting a black moon symbol onto one of the worker’s hats), Johansson
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Shooting a 35-Year-Old Roll of Kodak Film

What do you do when you find a roll of film that expired 34 years ago? Shoot with it, of course! Colin Wirth of This Does Not Compute shares the results of a recent experiment in this 8-minute video in which he shoots with some ancient Kodak Plus-X black and white film. If you grew up shooting digital only, you may not know that film has an expiry date on it – usually a few years after it was manufactured. Film degrades over time, but it can still be developed long after the expiry date. The most exciting part of shooting with expired
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This Artist Creates Dreamlike Portraits by Combining Multiple Photos

Viktoria Solidarnyh is a Ukranian digital photo artist who creates surreal, dreamlike scenes by cutting out and combining elements from a large number of photos. She has released a number of behind-the-scenes diptychs showing her source images to reveal how her composites are made. DIYPhotography reports that it takes Solidarnyh an average of 3 to 5 days to find source photos and create her artworks using Photoshop and Lightroom (and armed with a graphics tablet). You can find more of Solidarnyh work on her Facebook, DeviantArt, Flickr, Instagram, and VK.
Image credits: Photographs by Viktoria Solidarnyh
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A Landscape Photographer’s Quest for a Perfect Sunset Photo

Sometimes the excitement of another photographer seeking out the perfect landscape shot is all the inspiration we need to get outside ourselves. Join landscape photographer Adam Karnacz on a quest for the perfect sunset photo in this 12-minute vlog shot among the stunning vistas of the Lake District in Northwest England. In landscape photography, sometimes nothing goes right, but then there are days like this one where everything falls in to place. Karnacz’s enthusiasm is infectious as he takes us with him to the top of Wall Crag, which overlooks the beautiful Derwent Water – the perfect setting for capturing a
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Beyond War and Narcos: Polaroid Pics and a Different Vision of Colombia

Before ever setting foot in Colombia, I knew there was more to the country than the stories and imagery of war, violence, drug trafficking, and assorted horrors which pervade the media. So, in 2003, I headed to Colombia for the first time. Little did I know that would be the start of a project that I would carry out over eleven years and become the book No Dar Papaya. On that first trip I photographed a project that explored Colombia through the prism of beauty contests, in 35mm, but I brought my Polaroid camera and made several Polaroid images. The
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How I Shot a Photo Series Based on The Twilight Zone

I had been itching to do a composite photo series for quite some time. It’s something I had never actually done up to this point, but I was and currently am a huge admirer of the art form. I’ve been following the great composite photographers like Dave Hill and Drew Lundquist for the past several years. I’m a hobbyist, you could say — I work at a company called mOcean directing commercials, but I’m fortunate to be able to shoot photography for some of the movie and television posters that come through as well. I learned most everything I know
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Photographer Creates Maternity Photo with Husband Deployed Overseas

Photographer Jennifer McMahon has created a viral maternity photo that’s tugging at heartstrings around the world: it shows expecting mother Veronica Phillips next to her husband Brandon, a member of the U.S. Air Force who has been deployed overseas for nearly all of Veronica’s pregnancy. McMahon, of Jennifer Ariel Photography, was approached by Veronica with a photo of Brandon kneeling in the desert with an outstretched hand. The couple wanted a photo that brought them together in a maternity portrait, despite them being physically separated by thousands of miles. So, McMahon did a photo shoot with Veronica last
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How to Make a ‘2.5D’ Wedding Video: Bringing Photos to Life with Motion

My name is José Ignacio, and I’m a commercial and wedding photographer from Spain. I read a lot of blogs and magazines in search of inspiration — in this job there is a constant search for new ways of telling stories. The ‘2.5D’ technique always attracted me. I’ve seen it applied in other genres, but I wanted to use it in wedding photography. 2.5D is when motion is added to still photos. There are 6 steps to follow to create your own 2.5D video:

1. Select the pictures

Not all photos can be used for 2.
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Reality Check: What Counts as ‘Pro’ Photography Gear?

The short answer: whatever works for you. In this short video/soliloquy, photography educator Matt Granger takes a break from looking at the best pro photo gear, to help define what exactly “pro gear” means to him, and what it should mean to you. We call this a “reality check” because, given the frantic pace of camera gear releases, it’s easy to get sucked into the trap of thinking you have to use a certain camera, or lens, or accessory in order to capture a certain genre of photography. In other words: if you wanna be a professional photographer, you need
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Pro Tip: Don’t Pose Your Models, Direct Them

Commercial photographer Derek Heisler has some key advice for the novice portrait photographers in the audience: don’t pose your models. This might seem counterintuitive at first, but Heisler explains why ‘directing’ your models instead of posing them, will make a huge difference in your photography. Heisler talks about this issue in a so-called Minute Master Class he did for Vistek, calling it “the biggest mistake that a lot of photographers make.” “That’s really where my job is,” explains Heisler. “Anyone can stand in front of a camera and press the shutter, anyone can really kind of light [a
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Rephotographing Mt. Fuji, As Seen on the 500-Yen Japanese Banknote

Until the release of the 500-yen coin in 1982, its corresponding paper equivalent reigned for more than 40 years in Japan. In fact, it wasn’t until 1994 that the 500-yen banknote was finally withdrawn from circulation. One side of the note featured Tomomi Iwakura a Japanese statesman from the early Meiji period who played an important role in Japan’s modernization. The reverse side featured a view of Mt. Fuji taken from the top of Mt. Gangaharasuri in Otsuki City, Yamanashi Prefecture. It was from this mountain ridge I recently camped out and was fortunate to photograph on a fine spring
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The Unfiltered Truth About Entrepreneurship with Adam Braun

Adam Braun is an author and entrepreneur who you may know from his work with Pencils of Promise, an organization that creates schools and other projects that bring education to underserved populations living in rural poverty. He’s also the author of the book “The Promise Of A Pencil” and more recently the founder of a super exciting education startup called MissionU– he’ll get into more detail but tell me if you think this sounds interesting: 1 year of intense, skill-based education with NO upfront tuition – instead, you give them a percentage of your income once you land that sweet Continue reading "The Unfiltered Truth About Entrepreneurship with Adam Braun"