Subject Isolation: Finding Innovative Ways to Draw Attention to Subjects

I have no idea where I first heard this, but it’s extremely true: “the main difference between painting and photography is that the painters need to work hard to put things into their images, whereas photographers have to work hard to take things out of their images.” Painters start with a blank canvas, and every single thing that ends up in the final piece of art is a result of careful craftsmanship, years of hard-earned skill, and raw intention. The photographer’s canvas, on the other hand, is all of the world’s visual chaos, and he or she must deploy
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10 Things Van Gogh Can Teach Us About Photography

In keeping myself motivated as a photographer I love to look for inspiration from all across the creative spectrum. I like to take the advice of my favorite photographer Ernst Haas in this when he recommended to: “refine your senses through the great masters of music, painting, and poetry. In short, try indirect inspirations, and everything will come by itself.” I recently visited the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam and felt really energized by the work. Not only do I love Van Gogh’s paintings, but I love how he talks about being an artist. I feel he expresses that
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I Brought an Instant Camera to One of the Most Remote Villages in the World

Bulunkul is a very small and isolated town of 306 people that live deep within the High Pamirs in Central Asia. The people of the town live off of little more than yak and grain but are also some of the happiest I’ve ever met. Earlier this year, my brother and I went to Georgia and bought a two-decade-old Mitsubishi Pajero with a quarter million kilometers on it. We then spent the next 100 days driving it across most of the Caucasus and Central Asia. Here we are in Northern Georgia in the middle of winter, close to the border
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In Search of Beauty: Discovering My Place in Art as a Photographer

I’ve been taking pictures since I was 10 or 11 years old. A friend of the family noticed the bored expression on my face at the wedding of an extended family member. He was the photographer and he walked over to me, placed a large camera in my hands with a full roll of film, and asked me to help him out. I didn’t know the first thing about cameras, let alone this one. About as much as I could say for it was that it was “nice.” After the wedding, he gingerly opened up the back of the
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Confidence in Front of the Camera: Tips from 5 Portrait Photographers

Whether you’re photographing a high-profile celebrity in a big-budget shoot or you stop someone interesting on the street, everyone wants to look good in a photograph. Experienced portrait photographers always have a few tips up their sleeve for helping their subjects feel more at ease in front of the camera — it’s one of the most… The post Confidence in Front of the Camera: Tips from 5 Portrait Photographers appeared first on PhotoShelter Blog.

Creating a Photo of Nail Polish Bottles in a Swirling Splash

For a recent project, I was tasked with creating hero images for a cosmetic brand. They commissioned me to work on several different shots for a range of nail polishes they are looking to market. I was put in charge of coming up with the creative angle and had the freedom to explore and execute the final result. The client was open to any suggestions or ideas, and I had fun putting it all together. My vision was to keep the design simple yet unique and deeply orientated towards the brand and product on show. Nail polish bottles are generally
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The Winning Photos of Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2018

The prestigious Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition has announced the winning photos of its 2018 contest. The overall winner was Dutch photographer Marsel van Oosten for his photo titled “The Golden Couple,” which shows snub-nosed monkeys in China.

Van Oosten shot the photo in the Qinling Mountains, the only place on Earth where these endangered monkeys can be found. The male and female monkeys are seen watching an altercation between two other lead males in the 50-monkey troop.

“Whenever he did catch up and if the monkeys were on the ground, the light was seldom right,” writes the Natural

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This Music Video Mixes Day and Night Using Its Main Characters

Here’s a creative music video that may bend your brain. Featuring the song “No More” by the French electro band Loo & Monetti, the video visually mixes day and night through the two main characters. “It’s a poetic film involving two characters, one living in the day and the other at night,” producer Lionel Payet Pigeon of La Planète Rouge tells PetaPixel. “They cross the same places, but at different moments, like they where looking for each other.” The bodies of the characters were used as transparent “masks” in the shots — windows into the opposite half of a
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Diving Deep Into “brown, carmine, and blue” With Le’Andra LeSeur

We pride ourselves on having some very impressive in-house talents here at PhotoShelter and have been celebrating an incredible win recently. In early October Le’Andra LeSeur, a member of our Libris Client Services team, was awarded the juried grand prize at the 10th international ArtPrize in Grand Rapids for her multimedia piece “brown, carmine, and… The post Diving Deep Into “brown, carmine, and blue” With Le’Andra LeSeur appeared first on PhotoShelter Blog.

Neuroaesthetics: Where Science Meets the Art of Photography

Art is something we all enjoy in one way or another. We assume it is a subjective subject, but there may be an objective angle that we can observe art from. Perhaps art isn’t subjective at all? Neuroaesthetics is a scientific approach to art in the way it is both produced and consumed, and this gives us a basis for figuring out what makes art… art! The description is in the name. The beginning “Neuro-“ is Greek for the nervous system which finds its roots in our brain. Aesthetics is also Greek and it most directly translates to “I perceive,
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How Teenage Photographer John Kraus Shoots Rocket Launches

John Kraus is an 18-year-old photographer living on Florida’s Space Coast who has captured dazzling photos of major rocket launches over the past few years. VICE News followed Kraus to a recently SpaceX Falcon 9 launch and aired this short segment showing how the photographer works (it starts at 22m01s).
Still frame by VICE News Tonight/HBO
Kraus is given special access at launches as a member of the media. “I feel like it’s a viable career option, and that’s why I’ve decided to go all-in on it,” Kraus says. “I really want to show what the space program’s doing. I
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From Lighting Test to Album Cover: The Tale of a Photo in the Social Media Age

As a photographer in 2018, I can’t help but think of my photos as drops in an ocean of imagery. Here are a few quick stats: There are over 60 million photos uploaded to Instagram every day (not to mention Instagram stories). Then there are the photos posted to Snapchat, Twitter, Facebook (some people still use it, right?), blogs, etc, etc. Then you have the printed image, with over 1,300 daily newspapers and 7,000 magazines currently in publication, in the U.S. alone. Then you’ve got ads, with the average person seeing more than 5,000 images a day. We
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Why You’ll Never Find a Camera That’s Been to the Moon on eBay

NASA’s Apollo Program was an audacious mission to send astronauts to the moon – a national goal set by President John F. Kennedy’s in bold speech in 1961 that was an ongoing part of the Cold War. NASA’s use of photography aboard spacecraft originated during the Mercury Program when John Glenn carried two cameras during… The post Why You’ll Never Find a Camera That’s Been to the Moon on eBay appeared first on PhotoShelter Blog.

The Most Important Conversation About Life… Death with Michael Hebb

Michael Hebb is an artist, activist, restaurateur, long time friend of mine and probably the closest thing that comes to an expert on death. He is a hyphenated renegade, seemingly more comfortable swimming upstream and addressing taboo subjects than he is going with the crowd. He co-founded Portland’s unsanctioned underground food movement, was my co-conspirator for Songs for Eating and Drinking, and he recently wrote a powerful book about death that will change the way you view life. Let’s Talk About Death (Over Dinner) is a tactical guide for having the most important conversations with yourself and your loved ones Continue reading "The Most Important Conversation About Life… Death with Michael Hebb"

How this Creative One-Shot Scene Was Done to Show the Passage of Time

The Showtime series Kidding has an episode that introduces a character by seamlessly showing how a single room in her home transformed over a long period of time as she recovers from addiction. It might look like CGI or clever editing, but it was actually done with careful choreography and a single take. The split-screen behind-the-scenes video above shows how it was shot. As the camera moves around the room, assistants constantly swap out elements in the room to show the character getting her life back together. Tricks used in the shot include moving walls and body doubles. Over a
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