The First Ever VR Film Shot in a War Zone with a 360° Camera

The American news media company RYOT recently sent its World Editor, Christian Stephen, to the war-ravaged streets of Aleppo, Syria. While there, he used a 360° camera to capture the world’s first virtual reality film of the inside of a war zone. It’s an immersive short film that gives viewers a unique perspective into what the Syrian civil war has done to the country’s largest city. “Not only is [Aleppo] one of the most dangerous places on Earth, but it’s also one of the hardest to access as Syria’s civil war rages on,” writes RYOT. “We hope that, by sharing this immersive experience with the world, a new understanding of the horrors of war can be communicated like never before.”

A photo posted by RYOT (@ryotnews) on

RYOT says it will continue to work on using virtual reality technology to teleport its viewers
Continue reading "The First Ever VR Film Shot in a War Zone with a 360° Camera"

Fire Breathers Captured in Slow Mo and Bullet Time Using 50 Cameras

In addition to running a giant stock footage archive of over 1,500 4K clips, Philadelphia-based DOP Mitch Martinez also shoots Time Slice, or Matrix-style Bullet Time, footage. The video above shows slow-motion and bullet-time footage of firebreathers spewing fireballs. It was captured using a rig of 48 DSLRs, a RED Epic, and a Panasonic GH4. There’s no VFX or CGI involved: everything was done in camera. The DSLRs were used to capture the scene from 120 degrees to freeze time, and the RED Epic and GH4 were used to capture high-speed footage at 120fps and 96fps, respectively. rig2 rig Here’s a short behind-the-scenes video showing how the 120-degree “Time Slice” rig is set up for this type of shoot: You can find more of Martinez’s work on his website, Instagram, and Twitter. (via Mitch Martinez via Fstoppers)
P.S. Photographer Tyler Johnson did something similar to this using
Continue reading "Fire Breathers Captured in Slow Mo and Bullet Time Using 50 Cameras"

The Unseen: Surreal Portraits Made Using a Custom-Built Water Tank Set

5784-9936318-41_The_Zoo_jpg Instead of relying on photomanipulation, as is common these days, photographer Lara Zankoul creates surreal photos by putting together elaborate sets. For her project “The Unseen,” Zankoul spent roughly three months planning and building a large tank set that she filled halfway with water. Zankoul then filled the tank with various models, outfits, props, and even live fish for a series of dreamlike images. Here’s a short video with some behind-the-scenes looks at how the shoot was done: Here are more images from the project: 5784-9936145-14_Feminine_side_R_2_jpg 5784-9936232-47_patience_jpg 5784-9936366-Cencorship_jpg 5784-9936204-43_nouveaux_riches-fixed_jpg 5784-9936199-42_Flowered_jpg 5784-9936225-45_hurtful_jpg 5784-12472905-paranoiax_jpg 5784-9936156-18_the_noone_jpg “Usually I like to limit post-processing to color correction only,” Zankoul says in an interview with My Modern Met. “My approach is to create my sets during the photo shoot because I personally find it more self fulfilling.” You can find more of Zankoul’s work over on her website.
Image credits: Video and photographs by Lara Zankoul and used with permission

Street Photography in China

Smoky Square Shadows2-BW For the past 29 years I’ve been traveling to China for my day job as an industrial designer to manage the ramp-up of new products manufactured in China. I’ve discovered that it’s become a common career path for product designers to morph into Asian sourcing managers because of our background in product development. That’s exactly what happened in my career about 30 years ago, with the exception that I’ve remained active in product design plus I’ve become a street photographer in China over the course of the last 5 years.

Photography + Design

I studied both industrial design and photography at the University of Notre Dame but decided to pursue a career in design after discovering the pathetically low starting salaries for photographers in 1980. Junior photographers lived just above the poverty level. During my design career I’ve developed consumer products ranging from clocks, to organization products (Rubbermaid), and now
Weather Delay - Guangzhou Airport
Grinding Knives – Yangjiang, China
Annual Kite Festival – Yangjiang, China
Watching the Riot Police
Boy with fake gun – Qingxi, China
Grandmother with fake gun – Yangjiang, China
Future gymnast, Yangjiang, China
Knife factory – Yangjiang, China
Street sweeper – Qingxi, China
Young family – Qingxi, China
Step Dudes
McDonald’s conversation – Shanghai, China
Twins – Qingxi, China
Big hair – Qingxi, China
Oblivious – Qingxi, China
People watching – Hong Kong
Restaurant kitchen – Gongming, China
Mongkok market – Hong Kong
Early morning market – Qingxi, China
Hotel room studio – Qingxi, China
Apple Store - Shanghai
Smokin
Deep draw – Lijiang, China
Squid man at the night market – Qingxi, China
Crowded market – Qingxi, China
Fishnet Kabuki – Hong Kong
Smokin
Koko – Lijiang, China
Continue reading "Street Photography in China"

Street Photography in China

Smoky Square Shadows2-BW For the past 29 years I’ve been traveling to China for my day job as an industrial designer to manage the ramp-up of new products manufactured in China. I’ve discovered that it’s become a common career path for product designers to morph into Asian sourcing managers because of our background in product development. That’s exactly what happened in my career about 30 years ago, with the exception that I’ve remained active in product design plus I’ve become a street photographer in China over the course of the last 5 years.

Photography + Design

I studied both industrial design and photography at the University of Notre Dame but decided to pursue a career in design after discovering the pathetically low starting salaries for photographers in 1980. Junior photographers lived just above the poverty level. During my design career I’ve developed consumer products ranging from clocks, to organization products (Rubbermaid), and now
Weather Delay - Guangzhou Airport
Grinding Knives – Yangjiang, China
Annual Kite Festival – Yangjiang, China
Watching the Riot Police
Boy with fake gun – Qingxi, China
Grandmother with fake gun – Yangjiang, China
Future gymnast, Yangjiang, China
Knife factory – Yangjiang, China
Street sweeper – Qingxi, China
Young family – Qingxi, China
Step Dudes
McDonald’s conversation – Shanghai, China
Twins – Qingxi, China
Big hair – Qingxi, China
Oblivious – Qingxi, China
People watching – Hong Kong
Restaurant kitchen – Gongming, China
Mongkok market – Hong Kong
Early morning market – Qingxi, China
Hotel room studio – Qingxi, China
Apple Store - Shanghai
Smokin
Deep draw – Lijiang, China
Squid man at the night market – Qingxi, China
Crowded market – Qingxi, China
Fishnet Kabuki – Hong Kong
Smokin
Koko – Lijiang, China
Continue reading "Street Photography in China"

Street Photography in China

Smoky Square Shadows2-BW For the past 29 years I’ve been traveling to China for my day job as an industrial designer to manage the ramp-up of new products manufactured in China. I’ve discovered that it’s become a common career path for product designers to morph into Asian sourcing managers because of our background in product development. That’s exactly what happened in my career about 30 years ago, with the exception that I’ve remained active in product design plus I’ve become a street photographer in China over the course of the last 5 years.

Photography + Design

I studied both industrial design and photography at the University of Notre Dame but decided to pursue a career in design after discovering the pathetically low starting salaries for photographers in 1980. Junior photographers lived just above the poverty level. During my design career I’ve developed consumer products ranging from clocks, to organization products (Rubbermaid), and now
Weather Delay - Guangzhou Airport
Grinding Knives – Yangjiang, China
Annual Kite Festival – Yangjiang, China
Watching the Riot Police
Boy with fake gun – Qingxi, China
Grandmother with fake gun – Yangjiang, China
Future gymnast, Yangjiang, China
Knife factory – Yangjiang, China
Street sweeper – Qingxi, China
Young family – Qingxi, China
Step Dudes
McDonald’s conversation – Shanghai, China
Twins – Qingxi, China
Big hair – Qingxi, China
Oblivious – Qingxi, China
People watching – Hong Kong
Restaurant kitchen – Gongming, China
Mongkok market – Hong Kong
Early morning market – Qingxi, China
Hotel room studio – Qingxi, China
Apple Store - Shanghai
Smokin
Deep draw – Lijiang, China
Squid man at the night market – Qingxi, China
Crowded market – Qingxi, China
Fishnet Kabuki – Hong Kong
Smokin
Koko – Lijiang, China
Continue reading "Street Photography in China"

How Remote Cameras Are Used to Shoot Los Angeles Angels Baseball

Sports Shooter Academy recently released this 3-minute behind-the-scenes video in which Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim director of photography Matt Brown talks about how he uses remote camera setups to cover baseball games. During typical games, Brown will use 4 remote DSLRs: one on the roof with a 300mm lens, one behind home plate with a 180, one right outside the Angels’ dugout with a 24mm, and the last one near 1st base for capturing plays at the plate. Brown also says that due to the fact that remote cameras are unreliable in their results, he uses their images as “dessert” to supplement what he captures himself. Here are some of Brown’s Angels photos, both ones captured by hand and ones captured with remote cameras: Screenshot (263) Screenshot (265) Screenshot (266) Screenshot (267) Screenshot (272) Screenshot (264) Screenshot (268) Screenshot (269) Screenshot (262) Screenshot (270) Screenshot (261) You can find more of Brown’s work on his website and Instagram. Also, Sports Shooter Academy will be leading a sports photography workshop in November
Continue reading "How Remote Cameras Are Used to Shoot Los Angeles Angels Baseball"

This Honda ‘Paper’ Stop-Motion Ad Was Done Entirely By Hand and In Camera

New York-based stop-motion artist Adam Pesapane, who goes by PES, has earned a great deal of attention over the past few years for his remarkable animations that are made with creativity, hard work, and still photographs from DSLRs. His viral shorts include “Fresh Guacamole,” “Western Spagetti,”, and “Submarine Sandwich” (his projects often involve ordinary things getting turned into food). Honda recently enlisted Pesapane’s services to create the ad above, titled “Paper.” It runs just 2 minutes, but it took 4 months of work to create! The hands you see in the ad are real people who were placing roughly 3,000 unique illustrations in front of the camera, allowing the animation to be created one frame at a time. Screenshot (250) Screenshot (246) Screenshot (243) Screenshot (245) Screenshot (248) The ad spans the history of Honda’s products, and debuted today in national TV commercials during NFL football games. Here’s a behind-the-scenes video showing how the ad was made:

Kill Your Master in Photography

killmaster Dear photographer friend, I wanted to write you a letter on the concept of “killing the masters of photography”. It is kind of a Buddhist philosophy, as well as a philosophy I gained from Seneca, my stoic philosophy hero and mentor. So I was talking to Pooria, one of the students from a street photography workshop I held in Seattle. He asked me, “Eric, I see all these famous photos from the masters, and I don’t ‘get them’. What do others see which I don’t see?” To be frank, there are a lot of “master” street photographers whose work I don’t really understand or “get”. But then again, my preferences sometimes obstruct my vision. For example, I absolutely hate the taste of cucumbers and pickles, and I have no idea why others like the taste. But in reality, there are millions of others who like cucumbers and pickles. My
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Photographer Eugene Richards is Now on Instagram

15494603752_e577448471_z Heads up: Eugene Richards, one of the great American documentary photographers of our time, has joined Instagram. If you’re tired of staring at cats and selfies, @richardseugene may be an account you should start following today. Despite being a huge name in photography and a member of Magnum Photos and VII Photo Agency, Richards’ late arrival on Instagram unfortunately meant he wasn’t able to snag the @eugenerichards handle. That account belongs to someone else — a guy with the name “Eugene Richards IV.” Since joining Instagram earlier this week, Richards has uploaded a few photos to the service already:

Photographer Captures the Bizarre Beauty of Soviet Bus Stops

Disputed region of AbkhaziaPitsunda2 Back in 2002, photographer Christopher Herwig embarked on a long-distance bike ride from London, England, to St. Petersburg, Russia — a journey that spanned over 1,500 miles. The trip was also a photo ride, as Herwig challenged himself to capture one good photo per hour. As he biked through former Soviet countries, Herwig began noticing how unique many of the bus stops were. 12 years later, those bus stops are now the focus of a new photo project and book by Herwig that’s titled Soviet Bus Stops. Herwig compiled the photos by covering over 18,000 miles through 14 different countries of the former Soviet Union. He traveled by car, bike, bus, and taxi in his search for these strange micro monuments of Soviet aesthetics. “The local bus stop proved to be fertile ground for local artistic experimentation in the Soviet period, and was built seemingly without design restrictions or budgetary
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Continue reading "Photographer Captures the Bizarre Beauty of Soviet Bus Stops"

Inside the Syndicate: The Photographer Who Spent 2 Years Living with Yakuza

Back in 2012, we shared a post about the life and work of Anton Kusters, a Belgian photographer who spent two years living among the members of a Japanese Yakuza family to document life in the criminal underworld. The Economist just published this fascinating new 6-minute feature on Kusters, titled “Inside the Syndicate.” It’s a slideshow of the resulting work, with Kusters’ voice narrating the images and his story. (via The Economist via Reddit)

How I Shot NBA Star Anthony Davis Dunking the Sun

redbull dunk the sun san pedro basketball Anthony Davis Red Bull recently came to me with an interesting idea: “We’d like you to photograph NBA star Anthony Davis dunking the sun.” I responded, “Can we also have him dunk the moon?” My mind started racing with ideas on how to capture this properly because as most people, know the sun is a very bright object that’s about 93 million miles away — I totally knew that off the top of my head. Not to mention, it’s also very hard to look at for more than a brief moment. Which brings me to my first hurdle.

How to Make the Sun Small… and Not So Bright

Yes, the sun. That glowing ball of exploding fire that keeps our planet from freezing over. Again, super bright and very large, so we needed it to be the opposite. An object as small as, say… a basketball. To figure this out,
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Anthony Davis - Action
"The sun can be a real jerk!" -- Mario
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redbull dunk the sun san pedro basketball Anthony Davis
redbull dunk the sunsan pedrobasketballAnthony Davis
redbull dunk the sun san pedro basketball Anthony Davis
Continue reading "How I Shot NBA Star Anthony Davis Dunking the Sun"

Photographers Give Iconic Hollywood Movie Shots an African Remake

"Breakfast at ONOMO's" by Antoine Tempé [re-]Mixing Hollywood is a project by American photographer Antoine Tempé and Senegalese photographer Omar Victor Diop, who shot elaborate portraits inspired by famous American and European movies. Many of the scenes are instantly recognizable, except they feature models from Dakar, Senegal, and Abidjan, Ivory Coast, where the photos were shot. It’s a “cast featuring a representative sample of the cultural scenes in Dakar and Abidjan,” the photographers write. The duo says that cinema has the power to transcend geographic, racial, and cultural barriers, and that major cities in Africa weren’t left out of the influence iconic movie scenes had on pop culture. The photos were staged at hotels, as they represent “a crossroads in which cultures and origins from around the world co-exist and merge in a permanent cycle of reinventions and reinterpretations.” “I wanted to imagine what these movies would look like if they were conceived and
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"Thelma & Louise" by Antoine Tempé
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"Psycho", 2013.
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"Blow Up" by Antoine Tempé
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Continue reading "Photographers Give Iconic Hollywood Movie Shots an African Remake"

Shooting Junk with Junk, or: How I Repaired a Vintage Lens Myself

dsc00804-edit-small Three weeks ago, I purchased off of eBay a “junk” Minolta MC Rokkor-PG 58mm f/1.2 lens. I had read so many good things about this particular lens in Minolta’s history that I really wanted to get one for my ever-growing collection. A fully-functioning, good condition one will run anywhere between $450-$700. The listing for the one that I bid on stated, “For parts.” Reading the description a little further revealed that the glass had a lot of fungus, the aperture assembly was tanked and the focusing helicoid was seized. Call me a fool, but I bid and won it for $142 on the chance that I might be able to repair it. img_1418-small I’ve spent the past three weeks working on it. By the end of the first day working on it, I had the optics torn apart and cleaned to near perfection and the aperture restored to like-new
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The focusing helicoid all cleaned up and ready for install.
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Continue reading "Shooting Junk with Junk, or: How I Repaired a Vintage Lens Myself"

Photographer Creates the World’s Largest Negative

largestneg After hearing that a hundred-year-old building was soon to be demolished in downtown Vancouver, artist Joel Nicholas Peterson had an idea: why not give the building one last hurrah by turning it into one of the world’s largest “disposable” cameras? Peterson did just that, drilling 1/8-inch holes in the four walls of the building facing north, south, east, and west. He used the resulting camera obscura to shoot photos on the world’s largest film negatives for a project titled “Blueprints for Observation.” joel-nicholas-inside-the-camera Peterson’s photos were created by exposing giant lithographic film, which were then developed using sprayers. Once the negatives were created, Peterson used them to make cyanotype contact prints. The 14 ultra-large format photos form a near 360-degree view of the city around a building that no longer exists. blueprint-for-observation blueprints-for-observation blueprints-for-observation (1)2 joel-nicholas-peterson After creating his 13-foot-tall negatives, Peterson called up the Guinness Book of World Records to inform them of his
Peterson next to his giant negative.
Continue reading "Photographer Creates the World’s Largest Negative"

This Engagement Shoot Recreates the Opening Scene of ‘101 Dalmatians’

header A couple in Chicago recently posed for an adorable engagement photo shoot in which they recreated the opening love scene from the 1961 Disney movie “101 Dalmatians.” In case you’ve never seen it before, here’s the classic scene: Photographer Melissa Biggerstaff was hired to do the shoot for her cousin Corinne and her fiance Tony. “She had her heart set on recreating a cute scene from her favorite Disney movie,” writes Biggerstaff. “She is the BIGGEST 101 Dalmatians fan! I think they turned out pretty great!” 101-dalmatians-engagement-photos-tony-collier-corinne-jones-23 The couple dressed up in period clothing, enlisted the help of their dogs, and even went as far as to sit in the lake to faithfully reenact the original story. WEVgZNY 101-dalmatians-engagement-photos-tony-collier-corinne-jones-22 DHuLRuv header JFmi9BU 101-dalmatians-engagement-photos-tony-collier-corinne-jones-101 L37s8F5 101-dalmatians-engagement-photos-tony-collier-corinne-jones-100 M68ibTn You can find more of Biggerstaff’s work over on her website and Facebook page. (via Melissa Biggerstaff via BoredPanda)
Image credits: Still frames by Disney, and photographs by Melissa Biggerstaff and
Continue reading "This Engagement Shoot Recreates the Opening Scene of ‘101 Dalmatians’"

Iceland’s Epic Landscapes from a Drone’s-Eye View

650cdf28980001.55dc661cac017 Back in July, Polish landscape photographer Jakub Polomski spent two weeks traveling around Iceland and shooting aerial photographs with his DJI Phantom 3 Advanced camera drone. The resulting photographs are gorgeous. 5ec9d928980001.55dc661ca9d8e Polomski drove a total of 4000 kilometers (nearly 2,500 miles), both on the coastline and in the interior. b253a128980001.55dc661cb05f2 “Iceland is unique land, says Polomski. “Some locations look really abstract in the bird’s eye view.” DJI_0049 All the photographs you see in this post were captured by the Phantom’s 12-megapixel onboard camera. 2c74e328980001.55dc637135a53 4b044628980001.55dc63712eec4 9d3e3028980001.55dc661caae98 0613a528980001.55dc637138c6b 7efea228980001.55dc661caf4d1 7e478e28980001.55dc661ca8a72 DJI_0756 ec931528980001.55dc637133871 82a2e228980001.55dc637129622 5e4b7728980001.55dc6371271c0 DJI_0354 aab5b128980001.55dc661cae590 d8b12828980001.55dc63713127c Back in 2012, we shared a series of photos by Polomski showing mountain climbers dwarfed by the Alps. You can find more of the photographer’s work on his website, including the rest of this Iceland series.
Image credits: Photographs by Jakub Polomski and used with permission

BIG NEWS!! Bravery, Authenticity + Rising Strong in a Digital World — Brené Brown on #cjLIVE [Thurs, Sept 17]

cjLIVE Brené Brown Bravery and Authenticity in a Digital WorldA huge part of success is failure … but what we do AFTER a failure, heartbreak, or loss can make the difference between becoming defined by those stories or writing them. I truly believe this is the secret to unlocking your creativity and your biggest successes in life. Enter: Brené Brown. You certainly remember, Brené joined us in studio in one of the TOP #cjLIVE episode of all time to discuss vulnerability  and having the courage to share our struggles as a path to a more creative life…. WELL HERE’S THE BIG NEWS! I’m honored to have her join us again to chat about her new book RISING STRONG, and how bravery, authenticity, and Rising Strong from failure, is a huge catalyst to our lives. Only when we own our true stories — our failures and discomforts — can we truly access the full power of creativity, love, belonging and joy.

WHO:
Continue reading "BIG NEWS!! Bravery, Authenticity + Rising Strong in a Digital World — Brené Brown on #cjLIVE [Thurs, Sept 17]"