Arsenal is a Camera Add-On That Uses AI to Pick Optimal Settings for You

Arsenal is a new attachment for your DSLR or mirrorless camera that suggests the best settings for your shot using artificial intelligence, while also enabling you to fully control your camera using a smart phone. The recently announced Kickstarter campaign for the device reached its $50,000 goal in just 9 hours, and at the time of writing has surpassed $300,000. Arsenal’s most basic functions look quite similar to the Pulse, which we covered back in 2015. It connects to your camera over USB and then with your Android or iOS device via wifi. You’ll be able to see a live
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Triggertrap Open Sources Its Mobile Dongle Hardware

As Triggertrap continues winding down its business, their Triggertrap Mobile Dongles are becoming increasingly difficult to find. But there’s some good news now: the company has decided to open source the hardware, making it is possible to build your own dongle. The Triggertrap camera triggering system comprises three parts:
  1. The Triggertrap Mobile App. This app emits a 19khz sine-wave tone for a specific duration, which the hardware listens for. The app is still available in the Apple App Store and Google Play Store for free.
  2. The Triggertrap Mobile Dongle. This plugs in to your phone and listens for
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That Time I Paid $6,544 for 256MB of RAM to Run Photoshop…

Back in January 1995, I upgraded my Mac 8110 desktop to 256 megabytes of RAM for $6,544. Why? Because Photoshop needed a minimum of 5 times the RAM to work with a 8.5×11 RGB 8-bit color page, and that was 24 megabytes. The Chip Merchant was the least expensive source for RAM at that time. I purchased eight 32-megabyte chips at $818.00 each, or $6544.00 total — about $10,646 in today’s money after adjusting for inflation. Insured shipping was $42.85. Several years later, when it was time to upgrade my desktop, there was no way I
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MIT Develops Drone That Frames the Perfect Shot While Avoiding Objects

In their work with ETH Zurich, MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed a drone that simplifies aerial tracking by removing humans almost entirely from the equation. Aerial tracking shots normally require a team of skilled camera and drone operators to handle collision avoidance and framing. This system aims to change that with intelligent automation. A director can use the system to specify the viewing angle, screen position and size of the target’s face on the screen, and the camera-equipped drone will stay locked on using those parameters while also avoiding obstacles. The parameters can even be
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AI-Powered App Helps You Colorize Black & White Photos in Seconds

This is amazing. The researchers at UC Berkeley who came up with the automatic colorizer algorithm we first shared back in March, 2016 have released a major update. The software now lets you team up with the algorithm to colorize complex black and white photos accurately in seconds. Both the original app and this update were created by Richard Zhang and his team at UC Berkeley. But while the original often got many of the colors wrong, the update lets you give the algorithm “hints” so that it knows what color goes where. The fact of the matter is, the
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Google Will Soon Be Able to Remove Unwanted Objects from Your Photos

Google made a bunch of interesting and exciting camera-related announcements at I/O 2017, and we’ll cover them all, but one of the most intriguing was also one of the shortest. Google briefly showed off a powerful “content aware fill” feature that left people wide-eyed and clapping furiously. You can see the capability in this GIF. “Say you take a picture of your daughter at a baseball game, and there’s something obstructing it,” says Google. “We can do the hard work, and remove that obstruction.” Unfortunately, Google didn’t reveal much beyond this little teaser. We don’t know when this
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Sony Releases 1MP Stacked Sensor that Can Track Moving Objects at 1,000fps

Sony is pluming the depths of stacked sensor technology and uncovering all sorts of amazing gems—the a9’s 20fps capabilities, the Xperia XZ’s 960fps slow motion feature, and now, an industrial sensor that can recognize and track objects at an insane 1,000fps. The newly announced IMX382 is not destined to wind up in your smartphone, point and shoot, or ILC… it’s too small. At just 1.27MP, it was designed specifically for industrial use in factories, where it’ll spot issues with assembly line products more efficiently than anything else out there. That’s because Sony built circuitry right into the sensor stack
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Microsoft Announces Story Remix, A Spiritual Successor to Movie Maker

Microsoft will be launching their Windows 10 Creators Update in September, and the company has just unveiled one of the apps that’ll come with it. It’s called Story Remix, and it’s a video-crafting app that looks to be the spiritual successor to Movie Maker. Movie Maker saw its last release in 2014 before being discontinued at the beginning of this year. It was a free app that allowed Windows users to create simple mash-ups of photographs and video clips with basic transitions and other effects. Story Remix looks to be an advanced version of the discontinued app, and lands somewhere
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Google Launches ‘Street View Ready’ Certification for 360° Cameras

Google announced this week that they are releasing a new certification standard that they are calling “Street View Ready”. This certification will be used for 360° cameras that are able to publish to Street View, and are guaranteed to support the level of quality required for Google’s 360-degree mapping service. Google are launching ‘Street View Ready’ with 20 cameras from 18 manufacturers (including GoPro, Samsung, HumanEyes, Sphericam and others) already bearing the certification. There are 4 categories of certification, based on what standards the camera in question is able to meet. Street View mobile ready is designed for cameras
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This AI-Powered Camera Only Shoots ‘Award-Winning’ Photos

The Trophy Camera is an experimental camera powered by artificial intelligence that can only shoot images that it deems to be “award-winning.” Using machine learning, media artist Dries Depoorter and PhD student/photographer Max Pinckers trained the camera to recognise common patterns in World Press Photo winners from 1955 until today. When a photograph is taken, the camera gives it a rating based on how closely it matches the attributes of prior winners. Photos that get a 90% grade or higher are automatically posted to a website called trophy.camera in all their glory. The camera was built to remove
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How to Build a Simple Sound Trigger for High-Speed Photos With Arduino

Are you stressed? What better way to de-stress is there than to break things while making cool photographs at the same time? You can break anything, from spaghetti to fancy glassware, there is no limit. It will take you about half an hour to build the Arduino circuit and write the code for this sound triggering photographic system. This circuit used an Adafruit Electret Microphone Amplifier to detect the sound, and an opto-isolator to trigger the flash. Smash away!

Materials

How to Build a Simple Sound Trigger for High-Speed Photos With Arduino

Are you stressed? What better way to de-stress is there than to break things while making cool photographs at the same time? You can break anything, from spaghetti to fancy glassware, there is no limit. It will take you about half an hour to build the Arduino circuit and write the code for this sound triggering photographic system. This circuit used an Adafruit Electret Microphone Amplifier to detect the sound, and an opto-isolator to trigger the flash. Smash away!

Materials

Illuminati is the World’s First Bluetooth Light and Color Meter

The Illuminati is the world’s first Bluetooth light and color meter that works wirelessly with smartphones. It’s a battery-powered device that connects to your iOS device, Android or smartwatch over Bluetooth, allowing you to take live readings without stepping away from your camera. Exposure is calculated like a regular light meter. Inside the mobile app, set any two of the ISO, F-number and shutter speed, and it will calculate the third parameter for you, based on the incident light in your scene. You can also measure the color of both strobes and ambient lighting. Color balancing with the Illuminati on-set with a model A good light meter can improve
Illuminati clipped to jeans
The Illuminati Android app
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Motion Algorithm Turns a Single Photo into a 56-Minute Video

Videos are made up of about 24 frames every second, but what would happens if you fed a single photo into a motion prediction algorithm, and asked it to create the next 100,000 frames de novo after that? This video is what happens. This experiment was undertaken by a Google Engineer and artist named Damien Henry, and if we’re being honest, the word “video” might actually be a bit generous. “Acid trip” might be a better descriptor; or “what you see when your vehicle is about to reach hyperspeed.” But whatever you want to call it, the fact
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RAW vs. JPEG: An Ultimate Guide

I did not plan on writing a dedicated article on RAW vs JPEG. Why? I thought this ship had sailed long ago and the time of heated debates over which format is better was well into the past. But, what I realized in teaching photography is that this topic is still confusing and unclear for every generation of newcomers who decide to join the exciting and wonderful realm of photography. Here is my attempt to write the only article you will ever need to understand the difference between RAW and JPEG. Hopefully, you will have a profound Zen experience and
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How to Post Photos to Instagram From a Desktop Browser

Heads up: you can now upload photos to Instagram from a desktop browser… using a special, unofficial trick. In this step-by-step tutorial, I’ll show you how it’s done. Since Instagram was first released, it has only allowed users to create new posts using the official Instagram app. There are some options for posting images using third-party apps, but none are officially supported. Using them runs the risk of being shadow banned, which stops your posts from showing up in hashtag or location searches for around a week. Shadow bans seem to be becoming more common as Instagram cracks down
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This World’s Fastest Camera Shoots 5 Trillion Frames Per Second

MIT’s 1-trillion-frame-per-second camera is now outdated. Researchers in Sweden have created a new world’s fastest camera that shoots a staggering 5 trillion frames per second. This camera, called FRAME (Frequency Recognition Algorithm for Multiple Exposures) and developed at Lund University, can make “light practically stand still” and capture events as short as 0.2 trillionths of a second. Scientists say the camera will be able to document things in chemistry, physics, biology, and medicine that have never been caught on camera before — things that take places on a femtosecond scale. Just how slow is that? Here’s a mind-boggling fact:
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Amazon’s Echo Look is Your Personal Fashion Photographer

Amazon has announced a new camera. Called the Echo Look, it’s a hands-free camera that you can use to shoot self-portraits that are triggered by your voice. The product is a combination of having a voice assistant, personal photographer, and fashion consultant. After putting together your outfit for the day, users can stand in front of the Echo Look and say, “Alexa, take a picture.” You’ll be able to see the resulting full-length portrait using the companion app on your smartphone. These photos can then form a personal lookbook, which is then used to suggest new clothing items
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Google Engineer Raises the Bar On Low Light Smartphone Photography

When Google software engineer Florian Kainz showed his friends on the Gcam team a nightscape he captured using his fancy Canon 1DX, they threw down the gauntlet. Take that same photo, they challenged him, but with a smartphone camera instead. He accepted, and succeeded. The results of his experiment just went up on the Google Research blog, and they have photo lovers everywhere salivating at the low light smartphone possibilities. In essence, Kainz applied the same techniques that Google’s HDR+ camera mode uses to take better low light shots… and kicked them up several notches. HDR+ takes 10 frames
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ISO 12,800. Huh! What Is It Good For?

Absolutely nothing? Ten years ago, a Nikon D3 saved me while shooting a gig in a dimly lit club. It’s expansive ISO range of 200-6400 allowed me to shoot with a 24-70mm f/2.8 at about 1/20th of a second. Good enough for jazz as it was. As technology has progressed, ISO has gone from being a huge point of stress for photographers to a secondary thought. Even with compressed dynamic ranges, it’s pretty typical for sports photographers to shoot at ISO 2000 or higher while still extracting solid image quality. At some point, you have to ask what is
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