This post is by Jason Hellerman from No Film School

When I was a kid living in West Chester, PA, M. Night Shyamalan changed my life.

In the early 2000s he brought Hollywood to my hometown shooting many of his movies in the surrounding area.

But The Village holds a special place in my heart because they shot the location of the field virtually across the street from my parent’s neighborhood.

I remember the big lights at night, the vans, and seeing William Hurt walking around town.

As I look back on the things that brought me to Hollywood, that stands out as a formative one.

Well, decades after its release, the movie budget has leaked online. And inside it is a highly educational breakdown of what a movie that size costs.

You can read the budget below.

Budget-The-Village-Shyamalan-copy.pdf

The Village Budget

Released in 2004, the film is a psychological thriller set in a 19th-century Pennsylvania village whose inhabitants live in fear of creatures inhabiting the woods surrounding their isolated community.

Shyamalan’s The Village captured the attention of global audiences, amassing an impressive $256.7 million against a relatively small budget of $60 million. The movie’s dramatic plot twist ignited extensive conversations and debates, cementing Shyamalan’s legend as a storyteller.

The budget details the financial distribution for all the key players, from the top producer earning $3 million to the most junior production team members.

As the writer, director, and producer, Shyamalan earned approximately $12 million. It provides an intriguing look into the aspect of Hollywood accounting that is reported to the government (typically the higher figures) versus what is disclosed to individuals anticipating royalties and residuals.

The Village remains a subject of debate among fans and critics, with its themes and narrative choices sparking discussion about fear, isolation, and the lengths to which people will go to protect themselves from perceived threats.

The film’s production, marked by its commitment to period authenticity and the director’s distinct vision, stands as a testament to Shyamalan’s craftsmanship and his contributions to the psychological thriller genre.

Let me know what you think of the movie and the budget in the comments.