Author: Sunny Shrestha

Interesting Photo of the Day: Cold, Wet Day in Manhattan


This post is by Sunny Shrestha from PictureCorrect

There are some days when you struggle to get any noteworthy shots no matter how much effort you put into it. And there are other days when you get to capture a masterpiece. Something of this sort happened with photographer Fritz Bacon when his anticipation led him to capture this wonderful image of a surprise snowstorm in Manhattan:

Reflection of a man crossing street in Manhattan

“Cold & Wet Day in Manhattan” by Fritz Bakoon (Via Reddit. Click image to see full size.)

Bakon captured the image with his Canon 1DX Mark II body and Canon 24–70mm f/2.8L II lens at 24mm, f/2.8, 1/125 second, and ISO 640.

“I knew he was going to cross so I ran over to the closest puddle, crouched and threw my camera as close to the water as possible and held the shutter. Lucked out that the focus and composition worked.”

It’s just amazing how Bakon got the composition right even when working so quickly. The way he was able to get the person in the gap between the buildings and the reflection on the puddle all make the image so pleasing. The blue tone that he used to process the image conveys the cold feel of the city, and the red tail lights of the cars complement the tone.

A big part of getting a great picture is seeing the opportunity and acting quickly.

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The post Interesting Photo of the Day: Cold, Wet Day in Manhattan appeared first in the Photography Tips category on PictureCorrect.

Interesting Photo of the Day: Winter Hut


This post is by Sunny Shrestha from PictureCorrect

Challenging weather conditions make for one of the best conditions for taking dramatic photographs. The experience may not be a pleasant one in the short run, but at the end of the day, if the images come out great, you’ll realize that the effort was really worth it. The conditions in which photographer Paul Killeen took the following image seems to be a tough one, yet the image does justice to the effort that he must have put in:

“A Hut in Isolation” by Paul Killeen (Via Reddit. Click image to see full size.)

When you first look at the image, the blizzard and the snowy conditions are sure to give you some winter chills. But then, there’s the red hut in the center that imparts a feeling of warmth and hope in the middle of nowhere.

Visually, the hut is a talking point thanks to the contrast. The contrast of the red hut against the grey and white environment makes it pop beautifully. And since there’s nothing that we can see around it, this conveys a message of isolation, or should we say desolation.

“The weather helped in separating the hut from the mountains in the background. Because of the blizzard, I was able to shoot it looking like it was completely on its own.”

Would you dare to take your camera out and walk around in such conditions?

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The post Interesting Photo of the Day: Winter Hut appeared first in the Photography Tips category on PictureCorrect.

Interesting Photo of the Day: Intricacies of a Lighter Flame


This post is by Sunny Shrestha from PictureCorrect

If we only had the power to stop time, so many everyday mundane things would appear completely different. While we may naturally never have such power, our cameras do. Their blazing-fast shutter speeds allow them to capture all those intricacies of the moment that we easily miss even as we just blink. Take the following image taken by photographer Aske Wiil for instance. Many of us have lit lighters before, but when was the last time you noticed something like this?

lighter in action

“A Fiery Jellyfish ” by Aske Wiil (Via Reddit. Click image to see full size.)

Wiil shot the image with a Nikon D7500 and Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art lens at 1/4000th of a second, f/1.4 and ISO 400. And if you’re thinking that he used some kind of special lighter, think again—it’s just a regular Tokai lighter.

The most interesting aspect here is the shape of the flame. It almost looks like a flaming jellyfish, or a mushroom cloud that’s formed after a nuclear explosion. In any case, the shape is a beauty in itself. And the artist has done justice in emphasizing the flame by placing it in front of a dark background. This rightly draws the attention right to the flame—not that anyone could miss it.

We take using a lighter for granted, but with this high-speed image, we can truly appreciate the details that lie within. From the head of the flame to the little sparks caused by the spitting of fuel, everything is spectacular. And it was definitely not easy for Wiil to capture this shot. He had to take a sequence of 50 shots five times to capture this incredible moment.

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The post Interesting Photo of the Day: Intricacies of a Lighter Flame appeared first in the Photography Tips category on PictureCorrect.

Interesting Photo of the Day: Sunset at Lake Clearwater


This post is by Sunny Shrestha from PictureCorrect

We can’t stress enough how important lighting is in photography. The importance is even greater when it comes to landscape photography. The scene in front of you may be absolutely gorgeous, but if the lighting isn’t ideal, the real beauty of the landscape may not be reflected in the photograph. This is why almost any photographer would recommend shooting during the golden hours. Landscape photographer Paul Wilson‘s image of Lake Clearwater in New Zealand is a quick reminder of what you can expect during the magic hour:

sunset in Lake Clearwater New Zealand

“Sunset in Lake Clearwater, New Zealand” by Paul Wilson (Via Reddit. Click image to see full size.)

Wilson shot the image with his Canon 5D Mark IV and 16–35mm f/4 lens.

“We scouted locations for sunset and some astro for a few hours until we found the perfect spot to set up for the night, then we waited for golden hour, the sunset delivered nicely and didn’t disappoint!”

With a bit of planning and skills, golden hours rarely disappoint. The beautiful lighting has really brought out the gorgeous colors in the sky. Wilson’s idea of including the foreground, the subject, and the background has certainly added depth to the composition. And because he used a long exposure, the cloud trails have further given a dynamic feeling to the overall image.

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The post Interesting Photo of the Day: Sunset at Lake Clearwater appeared first in the Photography Tips category on PictureCorrect.

Winter Portrait Studio Photography Tutorial


This post is by Sunny Shrestha from PictureCorrect

Winter can be a tough time for photographers and models alike. Chilly weather, harsh conditions, and poor lighting all combine to make the job a tough one. Does this mean you should take a photography break when it’s cold outside? Photographer Gavin Hoey from Adorama doesn’t necessarily think so. Check out how he manages to bring winter into the comfort of his home studio for a great portrait session:

A winter photo feels incomplete without some snow. And replicating real snow inside a home studio can get messy. So, Hoey’s idea is to first take the photo and add the snow later in post.

To set the winter mood, Hoey has the model wear warm clothes and sit on a park bench replica. He uses a black background for the shoot and has a three-light setup.

Lighting Setup

Hoey uses an eVOLV 200 as the key light, placing it off to the side to avoid flat lighting. In order to avoid light spill and to have better control over the light, Hoey uses a grid as well. This is very important for a small home studio. The result is an image that appears to be lit by an elevated lamp post from the side.

winter image with key light

He uses another eVOLV 200 behind the model to act as a separation light. The light is set up to light the model’s shoulders and hat and separate her from the black background. This light also illuminates the smoke to give a hazy winter effect. Also, to emphasize the cold winter look of the image, he uses a blue gel on the back light. By setting the light’s power to 1/64 power, he is able to get a subtle effect.

indoor winter portrait

The key light illuminates one side of the model’s face, leaving the other half in shadow. Hoey uses a fill light powered at 1/128 and covered with a blue gel to add color to the shadows. This further adds to the cold winter feeling.

winter image with fill light

Winter Photo Shoot Technique

Besides creative use of lighting, Hoey makes use of a smoke machine to give a hazy look to the image. He also sprays some fake snow on the model to make the post-processing a bit easier.

snow photoshoot image

Post Processing

In the image above, the model has some “snow” on her when it isn’t even snowing. While you could use some more fake snow during the shoot for a realistic effect, the same can be achieved in post. Hoey demonstrates how you can add snow using Photoshop:

  1. Download and install his free Photoshop action from his blog.
  2. Open the image in Photoshop.
  3. Using Hoey’s action, select the kind of snow you want and click on the play button to run the action. After the action runs successfully, you will notice snow in your image.
  4. To remove the snow from unnecessary areas of the image, select the snow layer and paint over the snow using the brush tool with black selected.
  5. Once you’re happy with the image, go to Layer > Flatten Image.

To take things one step further, Hoey uses the Camera Raw filter in Photoshop to light the old lantern:

  1. Select the Adjustment brush tool.
  2. Set the temperature, tint, exposure, highlights, and clarity all the way to maximum. Leave everything else at zero.
  3. Reduce the brush size and click on the lantern a few times to give it a glowing effect.

Next, Hoey adds a warm glow around the lantern:

  1. Take a new Adjustment brush and leave the temperature and tint at maximum.
  2. Bring the exposure down to about under a stop and set the highlights and clarity to zero.
  3. Then, increasing the size of the brush, click on the lantern to add a warm glow around it.

Finally, to add some finishing touches, Hoey adds a radial filter to darken the area on the model’s left side. And to give viewers a feel that there’s actually a street lamp where the key light was placed, Hoey takes a large soft brush with a light blue color and paints on the corner. To make it realistic, he drops its opacity down for a subtle effect.

final snow photoshoot image

This tutorial is just perfect for those times when you want to take a winter-themed photo while avoiding actual winter photography struggles.

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The post Winter Portrait Studio Photography Tutorial appeared first in the Photography Tips category on PictureCorrect.

Interesting Photo of the Day: 20 Second Drone Circle


This post is by Sunny Shrestha from PictureCorrect

When you think outside the box, simple ideas come together to form a great idea. And when you put in some genuine effort, the result is magnificent. Photographer Frankie Sutera‘s idea to take a long exposure image while flying a drone around in circles resulted in an amazing photograph:

drone light painting

“Drone Light Painting” by Frankie Sutera (Via Reddit. Click image to see full size.)

Sutera took a 20-second long exposure while the drone was continuously circling around. And as he took a sequence of photos, he had one image wherein the person was incredibly still. He then stacked the images to get the resulting image. The stars and the drone are from the same exposure.

To achieve the bright lights from his drone, Sutera attached a Lume Cube light to his Mavic Pro. However, he suggests that you be careful when using the mounts as they caused his drone to crash shortly after the shoot; the mount popped up causing the blades to clip it.

What’s most interesting about the image is definitely the halo effect. But just think of the skills of the pilot. Hats off to him for maintaining a nearly perfect circular flight path.

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The post Interesting Photo of the Day: 20 Second Drone Circle appeared first in the Photography Tips category on PictureCorrect.

3 Tips for Wide Angle Portraits


This post is by Sunny Shrestha from PictureCorrect

The lens of choice for portraits is usually 50mm and above. But that doesn’t mean wide angle lenses can’t be used for portrait photography. They can absolutely be used for the purpose but there are certain things to watch out for. Photographer David Bergman from Adorama explains:

Shoot Parallel to the Subject

Wide angle lenses have a tendency to exaggerate features. Anything that is close seems larger than usual, and things that are far away seem too small. So, if you shoot from a higher or a lower angle, the image will look unnatural. It’s important that you keep your camera leveled and parallel to your subject.

distorted portrait with wide angle lens

Place Your Subject in the Center

If you’ve worked with wide angle lenses, you know that the images have a more rounded effect at the edges. If you have your subject stand at the edges, they will be stretched and distorted. That definitely isn’t flattering. Place your subject at the center of the frame when shooting portraits with wide angle lenses.

wide angle portrait tips

Pay Attention to the Pose

You don’t want your subject’s features to be exaggerated. As wide angle lenses have the tendency to enlarge anything close to them, it’s best to pose your subject with their extremities closer to their bodies.

exaggerated portrait with wide angle lens

“If their hands are sticking out closer to the camera, they’ll look out of proportion to the rest of themselves.”

Keep in mind that these points are to be considered as long as you want to have a flattering image of your subject. If your goal is to get creative with your portraits using distortion and perspective, feel free to experiment and break these so-called rules.

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The post 3 Tips for Wide Angle Portraits appeared first in the Photography Tips category on PictureCorrect.

Horror Filmmaker Damien LeVeck Tells You Which NLEs to Learn


This post is by Sunny Shrestha from No Film School


We learn some insightful filmmaking tips for jumpscares and cloud storage.


Every filmmaker, whether they know it or not, is an expert in suspense and horror—that is, at least, if you’ve ever had the sudden panic that comes from checking to see if your footage is backed up and properly stored, or if just by chance something’s gone wrong and your entire day’s work is missing or corrupt.



For filmmaker Damien LeVeck, horror filmmaking isn’t nearly as scary since he’s started working with cloud storage and remote editing with Blackmagic and DaVinci Resolve. He’s also a seasoned editor who learned how to deconstruct horror genre tropes like jumpscares to write and direct some standout horror features including The Cleansing Hour and his latest film A Creature Was Stirring.



We chatted with LeVeck to talk about how he was able to tailor his cloud workflow for the least amount of suspense, as well as to see if he could share some tips for other aspiring horror filmmakers and editors looking to develop their genre craft.

Read More

Interesting Photo of the Day: Inside an Ice Cave


This post is by Sunny Shrestha from PictureCorrect

Of the various landscapes and structures that we can find in nature, ice caves are one of the most interesting and fascinating. Unlike other easily accessible sites, ice caves are less frequently visited by travelers. This is one of the reasons why many of us find it so alluring. Photographer Tristan Todd took the following image of an ice cave in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia, Canada and it’s an excellent example of how beautiful they can be:

inside an ice cave

“Inside an Ice Cave in British Columbia” by Tristan Todd (Via Reddit. Click image to see full size.)

This image is a blend of three exposures. He took the base shot focusing on the ice in the midground and the background. With the second shot, he recovered the highlight details from the bright openings of the cave. For the third shot, he focused on the ice in the foreground. He shot each of these exposures at 19mm, f/13, and ISO 100 with a 1-second base exposure shot.

If someone doesn’t pay close attention to the image, then could easily confuse it with an image of a surf barrel. The uniform blue color tone and the bright openings make them appear very similar. And thanks to the focus stacking that Todd has done in this image, we can clearly see the fine details of the ice. It looks really slippery and cold in there.

Doesn’t this image give you the chills? Would you dare to spend time in a place like this? Let us know in the comments.

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The post Interesting Photo of the Day: Inside an Ice Cave appeared first in the Photography Tips category on PictureCorrect.