Final Verdict Review of the Canon EOS 7D Mark II (Podcast 464)


This post is by Martin Bailey from Martin Bailey Photography


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Following on from my First Impressions review of the Canon EOS 7D Mark II, today we’re going to dive in a little deeper, and see how this new offering faired during my Winter Wonderland Tours here in Japan over the last few months.

Use this audio player if you’d prefer to listen:

Audio MP3

There are also download and subscription options at the end of the post.

Although I’ll touch on some of these areas again today, I ran through many of the great new features in that earlier First Impressions review, which was episode 453, so check that out as well to hear more about what’s new. One of my main objectives while shooting through January and February was to really try to pull the most out of the autofocus, because as we heard in my first review, I was not really impressed with how well the camera handles subjects coming towards the camera.

Another thing we’d not looked at yet was the ISO Performance of the 7D Mark II, so I’ve done some more tests and have got information regarding that to share with you as well today.

Am I Happy with the 7D Mark II?

OK, so the first thing that I’d like to get to, is really somewhat subjective, but very important, as I know that some people have not been happy with the 7D Mark II, especially because of the autofocus capabilities in certain situations. Well, if you ask me if I’m in general happy with this new camera, the answer is a

Canon EOS 7D Mark II
Canon EOS 7D Mark II Intelligent Viewfinder II
7D Mark II AI Servo Settings
AI Servo Tracking Success (click to view larger)
ISO 100 on the 1D X
ISO 100 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 200 on the 1D X
ISO 200 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 400 on the 1D X
ISO 400 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 800 on the 1D X
ISO 800 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 1600 on the 1D X
ISO 1600 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 3200 on the 1D X
ISO 3200 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 6400 on the 1D X
ISO 6400 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 12800 on the 1D X
ISO 12800 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 25600 on the 1D X
ISO 25600 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 51200 on 1D X
ISO 51200 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 102400 on 1D X
ISO 204800 on 1D X
ISO 100 on the 1D X
ISO 100 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 200 on the 1D X
ISO 200 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 400 on the 1D X
ISO 400 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 800 on the 1D X
ISO 800 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 1600 on the 1D X
ISO 1600 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 3200 on the 1D X
ISO 3200 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 6400 on the 1D X
ISO 6400 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 12800 on the 1D X
ISO 12800 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 25600 on the 1D X
ISO 25600 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 51200 on 1D X
ISO 51200 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 102400 on 1D X
ISO 204800 on 1D X
ISO 100 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 400 on the 1D X
ISO 200 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 800 on the 1D X
ISO 400 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 1600 on the 1D X
ISO 800 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 3200 on the 1D X
ISO 1600 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 6400 on the 1D X
ISO 3200 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 12800 on the 1D X
ISO 6400 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 25600 on the 1D X
ISO 12800 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 51200 on 1D X
ISO 25600 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 102400 on 1D X
ISO 51200 on the 7D Mark II
ISO 204800 on 1D X
Boat Graveyard #2
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Continue reading “Final Verdict Review of the Canon EOS 7D Mark II (Podcast 464)”

My Favorite Football Shots From The 2014 Season


This post is by Scott Kelby from Scott Kelby's Photoshop Insider


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




OK, I am WAY behind on posting this, especially since we’re just about to start cranking up the 2015 NFL season, but it’s one of those better-late-than-never things (at least that’s what I keep telling myself). 🙂

A 60-Second Recap:
I wound up shooting about the same number of games this year as I did last year, but I still missed quite a few games overall due to my travel schedule and family vacations (I have the opportunity to shoot about 21 games total per season if I shoot every single week, including preseason).  I shot most of the Bucs home games, and I picked up a few other games when the Buc’s were on the road.

Here are the teams I got to shoot this season:

  1. Tampa Bay Bucs
  2. Tennessee Titans
  3. Miami Dolphins
  4. St. Louis Rams
  5. Pittsburgh Steelers
  6. Atlanta Falcons
  7. New York Giants
  8. New Orleans Saints
  9. Cincinnati Bengals
  10. Green Bay Packers
  11. Minnesota Vikings
  12. Carolina Panthers
  13. Baltimore Ravens
  14. Philadelphia Eagles

NOTE: This season I picked up shooting the only team I hadn’t shot yet: The Baltimore Ravens.

I did a full post, with all the stories and full size images, over at exposure.co – If you get a few minutes, I hope you’ll check it out – here’s the link:

https://scottkelby.exposure.co/my-favorite-football-images

There ya have it —-my favorite NFL shots from this past season
Thanks to everybody who tolerated my football posts this season and to everybody who supported me throughout the year with your kind words and comments (and to everybody who followed my game day on Instagram). I love sharing what I pick up from shooting these games (good and bad), and it’s been really fun having you all along with me on this journey. 🙂

3 of 3: Some lovely long exposure on Brighton Pier tonight. Full…


This post is by Philip Bloom from Philip Bloom


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




3 of 3: Some lovely long exposure on Brighton Pier tonight. Full 51mp versions on my flickr page flickr.com/philipbloom #Pentax645z #ShadowsLight

2 of 3: Some lovely long exposure on Brighton Pier tonight. Full…


This post is by Philip Bloom from Philip Bloom


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




2 of 3: Some lovely long exposure on Brighton Pier tonight. Full 51mp versions on my flickr page flickr.com/philipbloom #Pentax645z #ShadowsLight

1 of 3: Some lovely long exposure on Brighton Pier tonight. Full…


This post is by Philip Bloom from Philip Bloom


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




1 of 3: Some lovely long exposure on Brighton Pier tonight. Full 51mp versions on my flickr page flickr.com/philipbloom #Pentax645z #ShadowsLight

Panasonic Lumix DMC-CM1 added to studio test scene comparison


This post is by Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com) from Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It’s not often that a smartphone being added to our studio test scene warrants a mention on our homepage, but it’s not everyday we see the likes of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-CM1. It’s a photo-centric mobile device with a 1-inch 20MP sensor and an F2.8 28mm equiv. lens, capable of 4K video and Raw image output. See how it performs in our studio scene. Read more

NAB 2015 Rumours. Are Canon and Panasonic going to produce Sony FS7 spoilers.


This post is by HD Warrior from HD Warrior


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




NAB 2015 is just around the corner and rumours are flying all over the internet of the following… Canon need to show a 4K alternative to the Sony FS7 if they are to stay in the large sensor race, 8bit C300 is old hat, 10bits are the minimum spec for 2015 4K camcorders. Canon need […]

[UPDATED] Can we get much wider? Canon EF 11-24mm F4 L USM samples gallery posted


This post is by Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com) from Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




[UPDATED] We were curious to see how the new Canon 11-24 F4 performed on a high resolution sensor, so we’ve updated our gallery with some landscapes and aperture progressions taken on a 36MP Sony a7R with a Metabones adapter. Though performance at extremes of the frame may not be representative of that on a native body, the 11-24 doesn’t disappoint. Have a look at the new shots in our gallery

Here Are a Few Easy, Great Looking Ways to Light an Interview with Inexpensive Gear


This post is by Robert Hardy from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Interview lighting doesn’t have to be bland, nor does it need to cost a lot of money.

Our friends over at the Slanted Lens recently put together a quick tutorial that walks us through five different lighting setups for one or two person interviews. And the best part is that the gear used for their shoot is all insanely affordable.




Now, I’m personally not a huge fan of the flat-ish lighting in a few of those setups, and the white background doesn’t help much either, but inexpensive lights like those from Photoflex, Westcott, Lowel, and even super cheap Asian knockoffs can all produce fantastic results with a little bit of wrangling and ingenuity. The key thing to remember is that it’s how you shape the light that matters, not necessarily the light itself. For that reason, things like mirrors, reflective umbrellas (which produce an even spread of slightly soft light), softboxes, reflectors, bounce boards, and even simple sheets of diffusion are all going to help you achieve the light that you want regardless of what kind of light fixture you are using.

Read More

Here Are a Few Easy, Great Looking Ways to Light an Interview with Inexpensive Gear


This post is by Robert Hardy from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Interview lighting doesn’t have to be bland, nor does it need to cost a lot of money.

Our friends over at the Slanted Lens recently put together a quick tutorial that walks us through five different lighting setups for one or two person interviews. And the best part is that the gear used for their shoot is all insanely affordable.




Now, I’m personally not a huge fan of the flat-ish lighting in a few of those setups, and the white background doesn’t help much either, but inexpensive lights like those from Photoflex, Westcott, Lowel, and even super cheap Asian knockoffs can all produce fantastic results with a little bit of wrangling and ingenuity. The key thing to remember is that it’s how you shape the light that matters, not necessarily the light itself. For that reason, things like mirrors, reflective umbrellas (which produce an even spread of slightly soft light), softboxes, reflectors, bounce boards, and even simple sheets of diffusion are all going to help you achieve the light that you want regardless of what kind of light fixture you are using.

Read More

Lowest Price Ever – DJI Ronin 3 Axis Gimbal w Hardcase + Gimbal Stand + Remote


This post is by Emm from CheesyCam


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




We’ve seen $500 dollar rebates on the DJI Ronin Gimbal (normally $3K), but the recent sale price at just $2249 + FREE Expedited Shipping is the lowest price i’ve ever seen it. That’s a huge -$750 savings off normal retail price right now.

I’m not a fan of this gimbal for anyone working with smaller cameras, but for those who have bigger camera setups or attempting to stabilize your cameras in aggressive situations this current price is a steal. SALE ENDS TODAY via B&H (click here).

[Update] Sale has ended. It’s now back to a -$500 off price.

DJI Ronin Gimbal 3 Axis StabilizerDJi Ronin Product Highlights
find-price-button DJI Ronin 3 Axis Gimbal Stabilizer w/ Hardcase Remote and Stand

5 Filmmakers on the Biggest Challenges They Faced Getting Feature Films to SXSW


This post is by Oakley Anderson-Moore from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




From first-timers to Academy Award veterans, do directors face arduous obstacles on every film?

Whether it’s a comfort or a concern, the following round-up suggests the answer is yes. Below, five directors from very different backgrounds describe the biggest challenge they faced making the feature films that premiered at SXSW 2015.



Creative Control


Director Benjamin Dickinson describes the most challenging aspect of making the slightly-futuristic film that won the SXSW Special Jury Award for Visual Excellence:

Read More

5 Filmmakers on the Biggest Challenges They Faced Getting Feature Films to SXSW


This post is by Oakley Anderson-Moore from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




From first-timers to Academy Award veterans, do directors face arduous obstacles on every film?

Whether it’s a comfort or a concern, the following round-up suggests the answer is yes. Below, five directors from very different backgrounds describe the biggest challenge they faced making the feature films that premiered at SXSW 2015.



Creative Control


Director Benjamin Dickinson describes the most challenging aspect of making the slightly-futuristic film that won the SXSW Special Jury Award for Visual Excellence:

Read More

5 Filmmakers on the Biggest Challenges They Faced Getting Feature Films to SXSW


This post is by Oakley Anderson-Moore from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




From first-timers to Academy Award veterans, do directors face arduous obstacles on every film?

Whether it’s a comfort or a concern, the following round-up suggests the answer is yes. Below, five directors from very different backgrounds describe the biggest challenge they faced making the feature films that premiered at SXSW 2015.



Creative Control


Director Benjamin Dickinson describes the most challenging aspect of making the slightly-futuristic film that won the SXSW Special Jury Award for Visual Excellence:

Read More

CP+ 2015: Olympus interview: ‘since 1936 our policy has been to make our cameras compact’


This post is by Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com) from Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When we attended CP+ last month in Yokohama, Japan we sat down with senior executives from several major camera and lens manufacturers. Among them was Haruo Ogawa, President of the Imaging Business Group and Executive Managing Officer at Olympus Corporation. Among other things we spoke to Mr Ogawa about the current and future direction of Micro Four Thirds and the challenges of introducing 4K video. Click through to read our interview

 

AIR SFO is Live & the AIR Book is now available for pre-sale


This post is by Vincent Laforet from Vincent Laforet's Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Project Air – San Francisco BTS February 2015 from Vincent Laforet on Vimeo.

I’m proud to announce the publication of the third city of the “AIR” Series:  San Francisco on Storehouse.

This has been one of the purest and most exciting projects of my career – this definitely feels like a once in a lifetime experience to me.

We are currently in the middle of scheduling a series of shoots in Europe in May thanks to support from G-Technology, and you can expect as series of meetups and events in cities such as Paris, London, Barcelona and a few more – to be announced very soon.

We’ve also launched a new site laforetAIR.com where you can pre-order a book,  postcards and a few more cool things yet to be announced.     A fine art print site will also be going up very shortly.

Thanks to your pre-oder of the books, we’ve already been able to add new cities to our lists of destinations.    A significant portion of every sale of each book will go towards shooting more cities!

 

BookAIR

Below you’ll find the series on Storehouse from San Francisco which was incidentally featured in The New York Times.   Given that I was a staff photographer at The New York Times for 7 years, it was quite odd to be featured “in” the paper – we used to joke that our goal was to never make it into the paper, because a staffer would only make into the paper when either:  a. They’d likely done something very very bad.   or b.  They passed away and the paper was running their obituary ;)

It was extremely flattering to be included to say the least.

NYT

Once again thank you for all of the support to

Continue reading “AIR SFO is Live & the AIR Book is now available for pre-sale”

Unveiling New Lattice Features That Will Drive More Traffic


This post is by Deborah Block from PhotoShelter Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Have you checked out Lattice yet? Lattice is our new image discovery platform to help get your work in front of new audiences. Join the community by curating boards – collections of PhotoShelter images around a specific topic or theme – to tell your own stories.

The boards we’re seeing on Lattice so far are looking fantastic, everything from African Elephants, to Lisbon, to Lightning Photography. They really all do an awesome job featuring beautiful photography from across the PhotoShelter community. We’re truly wowed.

We’ve been hard at work to enhance the curator experience and drive even more traffic to your Lattice boards. Check out the following features when you create your next board (and note that the images you add to your boards will now appear with a watermark):

  • Like Button: Let’s celebrate great photography! The new “like” button for boards and images allows people to show their appreciation for your curation. See who has liked your work, then share your boards to drive more traffic.

  • Most Popular Boards: Boards that earn the most likes will now be showcased front and center in the Most Popular section of our brand-new homepage. That means the more likes you have, the more exposure we give you.

  • Recently Updated Page: When you add new images to a board you’ve already made, we’ll feature you on our Recently Updated page. That means the more you engage with your boards, the more visibility you’ll get.

  • New User Profile: Check out your updated user profile to review your most popular boards, as well as a history of everything you’ve liked. Just click on the “My Profile” link (under the “Hi!” menu in the Lattice header).

The Daily Promo: Ryan Nicholson


This post is by Heidi Volpe from A Photo Editor


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




_NP_4600
_NP_4606 _NP_4608

final-LWH_NP_0161

final-LWH_NP_0180

final-LWH_NP_0415

final-LWH_NP_0425

Ryan Nicholson

Who printed it?
It was printed by Spangler Graphics in Kansas City where I am based.

 Who designed it?
Designed by Kirk Lakebrink a Kansas City based designer.

Who edited the images?
Edited by myself and JP Perlmutter an artist consultant.

How many did you make?
We printed 275 copies of the piece and I mailed out 220. I will use the remaining pieces as leave behinds at portfolio shows, etc…

How many times a year do you send out promos?
For the past two years I have sent out 6 direct mail pieces a year (basically one every other month) and this year I am going to do them quarterly.

Where did your idea of women and hoops come from?
It is a long story on how I ended up shooting the piece but I will try and summarize. I played high school and college basketball. I graduated with a history degree and started my professional career as a high school history teacher/basketball coach. I taught and coached in Moore, Oklahoma then in Kansas City, Missouri and finally out in Phoenix, Arizona. The last year that I taught in Phoenix I actually switched from teaching history to photography but through a combination of teaching burnout and revitalized interest in photography (my father was a photographer) I decided not to renew my teaching contract and to give photography my full time attention. I started as a stringer for a couple small newspapers in Phoenix and my business has grown and shifted in a variety of ways over the past ten plus years. I am now based in my hometown of Kansas City, Missouri shooting a mixture of editorial and commercial work.

Despite my career change away from coaching I have always maintained a love and interest in basketball and decided over this past year that I wanted to dedicate some time and attention to shooting it specifically. I had a trip scheduled to New York for portfolio shows last summer and was digging around for information on the street basketball scene in the city. I found a documentary on NYC street basketball called “Doin’ it in the Park” on Netflix which led me to their Facebook page. I was looking at the film’s Facebook page and saw a post about a group of women that play pick up ball every Sunday at Goat Park in the upper west side. I found that “Ladies Who Hoop” Facebook page and sent a message to the organizer asking if I could come and photograph them while I was visiting. The organizer Amber Batchelor welcomed me with open arms and I spent a good portion of a Sunday photographing the group while I was in town.

The second part of my interest in photographing the women was my desire to create images of women in a manner that shows them as strong, athletic, etc….I have two young daughters and any opportunity that I have to use my time and talents to document women that are strong and pushing boundaries I consider time well spent. I have to say watching the women take over one of the courts in a prominent New York City park was really cool to watch and document. I am in the planning stages of another trip there and will definitely go back and photograph the group again.

Read more in SLAM Magazine here
 

How to Get Your Documentary on Public Television


This post is by Oakley Anderson-Moore from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Getting a broadcast premiere for a documentary is still a much-coveted channel of distribution for documentaries — and with a little help navigating the public television infrastructure — PBS can be a great place to do it.

With some 498 hours of documentary programming airing every year on public television, PBS is a viable and financially competitive (depending on the strand your film plays in) place to have a broadcast premiere. Another aspect of a PBS broadcast that appeals to filmmakers is the potential for a larger reach as public television is always free. On the SXSW 2015 session Doc Distribution: Get Up to Speed with PBS Indies, the VP of Programming Donald Thoms and WORLD Channel GM Liz Cheng sat down with Marshall Curry, Yance Ford, and Byron Hurt to explain the basics of making it in to the PBS pipeline. No Film School was on the scene to pass off the following main points to you.



Familiarize Yourself with PBS Programming

“A lot of people don’t know system,” says Donald Thoms. “When I see something pitched to us that clearly doesn’t fit, I have to ask, have you ever watched PBS?”

Read More

How to Get Your Documentary on Public Television


This post is by Oakley Anderson-Moore from No Film School


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Getting a broadcast premiere for a documentary is still a much-coveted channel of distribution for documentaries — and with a little help navigating the public television infrastructure — PBS can be a great place to do it.

With some 498 hours of documentary programming airing every year on public television, PBS is a viable and financially competitive (depending on the strand your film plays in) place to have a broadcast premiere. Another aspect of a PBS broadcast that appeals to filmmakers is the potential for a larger reach as public television is always free. On the SXSW 2015 session Doc Distribution: Get Up to Speed with PBS Indies, the VP of Programming Donald Thoms and WORLD Channel GM Liz Cheng sat down with Marshall Curry, Yance Ford, and Byron Hurt to explain the basics of making it in to the PBS pipeline. No Film School was on the scene to pass off the following main points to you.



Familiarize Yourself with PBS Programming

“A lot of people don’t know system,” says Donald Thoms. “When I see something pitched to us that clearly doesn’t fit, I have to ask, have you ever watched PBS?”

Read More