Warping Reality: Adobe’s Neural Filters are Ripe for Mayhem


This post is by Allen Murabayashi from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Face tuning apps have thrived for years in the mobile phone ecosystem, allowing users to make subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) changes to their appearance for a selfie-obsessed generation.

Some consumers use the tools to get closer to the generic celebface look that dominates the influencer world of the Kardashians. For others, the tools are used to simply erase a few years from one’s visage – perhaps turning a selfie into a headshot for professional use. We’ve even seen “fun” apps that advance age in your photo, built by questionable developers with unknown motives.

But whereas face tuning apps

Continue reading “Warping Reality: Adobe’s Neural Filters are Ripe for Mayhem”

Shooting an Intimate Portrait Project with the Unreleased iPhone 12 Pro


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The iPhone 12 Pro was just announced, but today we are getting to see a few of the very first portraits shot on the latest from Apple. In a PetaPixel exclusive, this series by photographer Aundre Larrow captures friends and family that have spent most of 2020 quarantined together.

You may remember Aundre Larrow from his time as an Adobe Creative Resident. Since then, he’s continued to hone his craft and improve, and getting to work with Apple became a kind of natural transition given the organizations he worked with.

“A couple of years ago I was working with Moment

Continue reading “Shooting an Intimate Portrait Project with the Unreleased iPhone 12 Pro”

How Richard Nixon ‘Stole’ This Photo and Twisted It Into a Campaign Slogan


This post is by Martin Kaninsky from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




American people standing up to the Soviets! America needs Nixon! These were some of the tag lines attached to this photo during Nixon’s presidential campaign in 1960. But behind every picture, there is a story. And this is one of those photos where the story is just as good as the picture.

How many times have you heard the phrase: “truth is in the eye of the beholder”?

We’ve seen it many times in the history of photography and photojournalism. Some photographs are just not what they appear to be. Sometimes the composition is corrected later in the post, sometimes

Continue reading “How Richard Nixon ‘Stole’ This Photo and Twisted It Into a Campaign Slogan”

How Richard Nixon ‘Stole’ This Photo and Twisted It Into a Campaign Slogan


This post is by Martin Kaninsky from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




American people standing up to the Soviets! America needs Nixon! These were some of the tag lines attached to this photo during Nixon’s presidential campaign in 1960. But behind every picture, there is a story. And this is one of those photos where the story is just as good as the picture.

How many times have you heard the phrase: “truth is in the eye of the beholder”?

We’ve seen it many times in the history of photography and photojournalism. Some photographs are just not what they appear to be. Sometimes the composition is corrected later in the post, sometimes

Continue reading “How Richard Nixon ‘Stole’ This Photo and Twisted It Into a Campaign Slogan”

The Best Gear for Storm Photography


This post is by Martin Lisius from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I first became interested in storms when I was a boy growing up in Texas, the only state in the US that experiences tornadoes, hurricane and blizzards on a regular basis. I built a scale model of a supercell thunderstorm inside a clear plexiglass box using cotton and a light bulb for lightning, and won first place in the weather category at our local science fair. Then I got permission from my mother to climb onto our roof and build a weather station.

When I was 12, I took my first storm photo: a big, fat bolt of lightning shot

Continue reading “The Best Gear for Storm Photography”

The Best Gear for Storm Photography


This post is by Martin Lisius from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I first became interested in storms when I was a boy growing up in Texas, the only state in the US that experiences tornadoes, hurricane and blizzards on a regular basis. I built a scale model of a supercell thunderstorm inside a clear plexiglass box using cotton and a light bulb for lightning, and won first place in the weather category at our local science fair. Then I got permission from my mother to climb onto our roof and build a weather station.

When I was 12, I took my first storm photo: a big, fat bolt of lightning shot

Continue reading “The Best Gear for Storm Photography”

How Yelp Scams Photographers (and Other Business Owners)


This post is by Dan St Louis from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’re a local business owner, you know that your number-one priority, day-in and day-out, is marketing your services and finding new customers. And in this digital age, the available options for marketing are surprisingly limited.

Because of the winner-take-all nature of social media technology, you’re basically stuck with Google, Facebook/Instagram, Thumbtack, or Yelp. (There are a handful of other small platforms that are relevant to specific service industries.) No wonder a recent report by Reuters showed that 60% of all online advertising spending occurs on just Google and Facebook.

Although we may disagree with their policies, hate the

Continue reading “How Yelp Scams Photographers (and Other Business Owners)”

How Yelp Scams Photographers (and Other Business Owners)


This post is by Dan St Louis from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’re a local business owner, you know that your number-one priority, day-in and day-out, is marketing your services and finding new customers. And in this digital age, the available options for marketing are surprisingly limited.

Because of the winner-take-all nature of social media technology, you’re basically stuck with Google, Facebook/Instagram, Thumbtack, or Yelp. (There are a handful of other small platforms that are relevant to specific service industries.) No wonder a recent report by Reuters showed that 60% of all online advertising spending occurs on just Google and Facebook.

Although we may disagree with their policies, hate the

Continue reading “How Yelp Scams Photographers (and Other Business Owners)”

How Yelp Scams Photographers (and Other Business Owners)


This post is by Dan St Louis from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’re a local business owner, you know that your number-one priority, day-in and day-out, is marketing your services and finding new customers. And in this digital age, the available options for marketing are surprisingly limited.

Because of the winner-take-all nature of social media technology, you’re basically stuck with Google, Facebook/Instagram, Thumbtack, or Yelp. (There are a handful of other small platforms that are relevant to specific service industries.) No wonder a recent report by Reuters showed that 60% of all online advertising spending occurs on just Google and Facebook.

Although we may disagree with their policies, hate the

Continue reading “How Yelp Scams Photographers (and Other Business Owners)”

4 Reasons Not to Switch Camera Systems


This post is by Michael Comeau from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Do you want to switch from Canon to Sony? From Sony to Nikon? From Nikon to Panasonic? From Panasonic to Fujifilm? Well, I’m going to ask you to stop, take a deep breath, and consider doing the most boring thing: absolutely nothing. Instead of switching camera brands, you should probably stick with what you have.

Here’s why:

Reason #1: Cameras Are Getting Better… and More Similar

Sony’s Eye-AF used to be the only game in town when it came to eye detect autofocus. Then Canon and the other brands caught up.

Feature leads never last because the big boys just

Continue reading “4 Reasons Not to Switch Camera Systems”

4 Reasons Not to Switch Camera Systems


This post is by Michael Comeau from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Do you want to switch from Canon to Sony? From Sony to Nikon? From Nikon to Panasonic? From Panasonic to Fujifilm? Well, I’m going to ask you to stop, take a deep breath, and consider doing the most boring thing: absolutely nothing. Instead of switching camera brands, you should probably stick with what you have.

Here’s why:

Reason #1: Cameras Are Getting Better… and More Similar

Sony’s Eye-AF used to be the only game in town when it came to eye detect autofocus. Then Canon and the other brands caught up.

Feature leads never last because the big boys just

Continue reading “4 Reasons Not to Switch Camera Systems”

4 Reasons Not to Switch Camera Systems


This post is by Michael Comeau from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Do you want to switch from Canon to Sony? From Sony to Nikon? From Nikon to Panasonic? From Panasonic to Fujifilm? Well, I’m going to ask you to stop, take a deep breath, and consider doing the most boring thing: absolutely nothing. Instead of switching camera brands, you should probably stick with what you have.

Here’s why:

Reason #1: Cameras Are Getting Better… and More Similar

Sony’s Eye-AF used to be the only game in town when it came to eye detect autofocus. Then Canon and the other brands caught up.

Feature leads never last because the big boys just

Continue reading “4 Reasons Not to Switch Camera Systems”

Infrared Ghouls and Goblins: A Fresh Take on Halloween Photography


This post is by Hoag Levins from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




A couple of years ago I was shooting Halloween yard scenes in a street photography kind of way when I realized that I wasn’t really satisfied with what I was getting. Over the last two decades, Halloween has been transformed into a major U.S. holiday focused on lavish front yard displays that often look boringly the same down street after street.

I was trying to find a different approach—and I did, with an Olympus OM-D EM10 II fitted with an internal LifePixel Standard IR filter. Viewing Halloween displays as black & white infrared images is really different.

Most of

Continue reading “Infrared Ghouls and Goblins: A Fresh Take on Halloween Photography”

I Restored and Colorized a Portrait of Every President Who Lived Before Color Photography


This post is by James Berridge from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I’ve been restoring and also coloring historical photographs for a little over two years. Towards the end of last year, I received a request to work on an image of Abraham Lincoln. Little did I know, this request would change the direction of my work forever.

I posted the completed, now full color, image of Lincoln online and I was really surprised by the response it received. The comments in particular really caught me off guard. Multiple times I got in essence the same response:

“I’ve never really been able to see Abraham Lincoln as an actual person before now.

Continue reading “I Restored and Colorized a Portrait of Every President Who Lived Before Color Photography”

Positive Developments and Negative Attitudes: A Word on Color and Conversion


This post is by Ludwig Hagelstein from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Color is complex. Achieving great color can be cumbersome, both in analog and digital workflows, and developing and researching it has been as hard as rocket science.

Since the advent of the so-called “analog resurgence,” the trope of the “true color of film” has been endlessly reiterated; over and over, to support or break arguments, to value and devalue work, and perhaps, to differentiate own from other. It has been a misconception employed by both those stubborn enough to only regard a photograph printed in the darkroom as a “real” photograph and by those marketing their uniformly looking wedding images

Continue reading “Positive Developments and Negative Attitudes: A Word on Color and Conversion”

Positive Developments and Negative Attitudes: A Word on Color and Conversion


This post is by Ludwig Hagelstein from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Color is complex. Achieving great color can be cumbersome, both in analog and digital workflows, and developing and researching it has been as hard as rocket science.

Since the advent of the so-called “analog resurgence,” the trope of the “true color of film” has been endlessly reiterated; over and over, to support or break arguments, to value and devalue work, and perhaps, to differentiate own from other. It has been a misconception employed by both those stubborn enough to only regard a photograph printed in the darkroom as a “real” photograph and by those marketing their uniformly looking wedding images

Continue reading “Positive Developments and Negative Attitudes: A Word on Color and Conversion”

Photographing Every National Park in Victoria, Australia


This post is by Jason Freeman from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




As a weekend photographer and keen explorer of our natural spaces, I recently(ish) set myself a photo project of capturing every land-based national park in my home state of Victoria, located in the south-east corner of Australia. Visiting all 45 of them took two years of regular trips, outside work and other travels.

The largest park is Alpine NP at 646,000ha (1.6 million acres) – an area that you could devote a lifetime of exploration to and barely touch the surface. At the other end of the scale is Lind NP at 1370ha with no tracks passing through it

Continue reading “Photographing Every National Park in Victoria, Australia”

4 Things I’ve Learnt About Photography in 2020 (so far)


This post is by Anthony Epes from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




What a strange year this has been, right? Yet, curiously, this has also been a year in which I have probably taken the greatest leaps in my photography for some time. Because when you are doing something new, or have been pushed into a new way of life, you can either freeze and panic… or you can use it as an opportunity to try new things. To innovate.

What a strange year this has been, right? Yet curiously this has been a year in which I have probably taken the greatest leaps in my photography for some time. Because when

Continue reading “4 Things I’ve Learnt About Photography in 2020 (so far)”

Akaka Falls by Moonlight: How I Got the Shot


This post is by Harry Durgin from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Summer and Fall are wonderful for photographing the Milky Way here in Hawai’i. We have many locations with dark skies and breathtaking scenery too. In October, the brightest part of the Milky Way (galactic core) is near the horizon at sunset; by November it’ll be below the horizon when it gets dark.

I also like to think about the opportunities the moonlight offers. Sometimes I like to shoot with no moon at all and with only the stars to light the landscape. The star light comes from all directions and shadows are hard to make out. This gives images a

Continue reading “Akaka Falls by Moonlight: How I Got the Shot”

The Building Blocks of Artistic Portrait Photography


This post is by Darren Lewey from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Of the many creative photographic genres, it is perhaps portrait photography where two camps—the representative and the artistic—can be most clearly observed. Whilst the former requires context through captions and backstory to elevate it, in the later, the absence of such requires creative aptitude. Attempting to merge both camps in one photograph can often diminish its effectiveness.

Portrait photography at its pinnacle should be intense. The photographer has chosen a subject for a reason, and that reason should emerge in the final image. It should be the session’s driving force. What is it that attracts us to photograph this individual?

Continue reading “The Building Blocks of Artistic Portrait Photography”