Mental Health Help for Photographers (And Everyone Else)


This post is by Caitlyn Edwards from PetaPixel


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As amusing as some COVID-19 memes and tweets have been (not to mention a welcome break from the endless news cycle), we want to be very clear about the importance of taking care of your mental health right now.

A lot of us are feeling particularly isolated, lonely, anxious and, at times, a bit hopeless. The seriousness of what is transpiring around the world is not something to be taken lightly, and we want to encourage a conversation within the photography community.

So how do you care for your mental health when you’re social distancing or staying home under government

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‘Ireland’s Most Loved Wedding Photographer’ is Stealing My Work


This post is by Brad Trent from PetaPixel


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My name is Brad Trend, and I’m a portrait photographer based in New York City. Yesterday, on April Fools’ Day, I received an anonymous email that pointed me to a photographer’s website who seemed to be passing off one of my photographs as his own.

Since I have been locked inside my apartment for almost three weeks—and had just watched the Netflix Documentary, “Don’t F**k With Cats” about a group of Facebook sleuths who tracked down a murderer—I had plenty of time to do some reverse-image searching and Internet sleuthing of my own to get to the bottom of

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Alicia Keys Says ‘Sleazy’ Photographer Manipulated Her When She was 19


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


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In her new memoir More Myself, Grammy-winning musician Alicia Keys shares a troubling story of a professional photographer who manipulated her into posing provocatively for an album cover. She was just 19 years old at the time.

Keys musical career began at the tender age of 15, but it really took off in 2001 when she released her debut album Songs in A Minor. The photo shoot, as described by Keys, would have happened in the lead-up to that album release, sometime during the year 2000 when Keys was 19 years old.

According to the musician, while she was

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An Ode to Vintage Lenses and How I Stopped Giving a Damn About Sharpness


This post is by Mark O. from PetaPixel


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As with a majority of newbies to photography, the obsession with gear and chasing the newest toys proved to be irresistible to me. I spent far more time reading reviews, comparing charts, watching youtube videos, and looking for deals than actually going out and shooting.

I took hundreds of test shots to make sure the AF was properly focusing, and I near memorized the MTF curves for each of my lenses to know at exactly how far I should stop them down to get the sharpest possible shots. Instead of concentrating on composition, I pored over my images at 300%

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Did Apple Copy My Photo for Their TV Show?


This post is by Adrian Murray from PetaPixel


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Last night, once the kids were safely nestled in bed and only the wife and I remained awake, I reached for my iPhone, opened up the Remote app to fire up my Apple TV, launched Apple TV+, and hit play on one of the tech giant’s newest shows: Amazing Stories.

About 45 seconds later, I noticed something rather … familiar … in the visuals: my own photo recreated into a short burst of cinema. It wasn’t until I investigated further that I realized how much of my image I believe they used to derive this portion of the opening credits—the

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How to Manage Self-Isolation: Tips for Freelance Photographers


This post is by Rich Dyson from PetaPixel


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Given the recent guidelines on social distancing from various health organizations, the novel coronavirus and the disease it causes (COVID-19) means that most of us will be self-isolating for some time. As a freelancer, how can you manage this enforced downtime positively?

Over the past five weeks, I was already dealing with an enforced “lay-off” from work. An accident whilst taking photographs for a forthcoming book left me with a broken ankle and six weeks of being unable to work. With the growth of the novel coronavirus pandemic, many freelancers are now facing a similar period of being unable to

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How to Find Your Photography Style Fast


This post is by A.B Watson from PetaPixel


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Let’s not waste any time. What is the most important element in someone’s photography style? The quick answer is repetition.

What you do most, and most consistently, will define your style. What comes naturally to you will ultimately become your style. Your default setting—or, to put nicely, who you really are and how you see the world—will ultimately shape your photography style.

Someone’s photographic style used to be determined by only three factors: the film stock they generally used, the camera and lens they owned, and the subject matter at which they pointed their cameras. Street, portraiture, landscape, journalism, animals,

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What It’s Like Being a Photographer Right Now in the Early Stages of a Pandemic


This post is by Neil Ta from PetaPixel


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My name is Neil Ta, and I’m a photographer based on Toronto. In this article, I’d like to share what it’s been like being a photographer in the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic. It’s been crap, honestly.

The core of my work involves the congregation of many people in one place at the same time. As you can imagine, it’s been a challenging week. I’ve had four corporate shoots canceled (including a shoot out of country) and a photography workshop and wedding postponed, all in the last few days. Most of those corporate shoots will not be rescheduled.

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The Coronavirus Has Already Changed the Photo Industry Forever


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


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Amid countless updates about major industry events being cancelled (or not cancelled), gear being delayed, and factories being temporarily shut down—to say nothing of the day-to-day realities of dealing with a pandemic that have nothing to do with photography—it’s easy to overlook the long-term impact that this virus will have on our industry… has already had on our industry.

In many ways—many more ways that we’ll be able to predict and enumerate today, but which will seem obvious with the benefit of hindsight—the 2019 coronavirus will catalyze and accelerate a litany of changes in the photo industry.

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My Portrait Session with Fidel Castro


This post is by Per-Andre Hoffmann from PetaPixel


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It was my younger years. I had just published work from the Sudanese Civil War, and the Editor-in-Chief of Germany’s GEO magazine, wrote that “Per-Andre risks life and limb for a good shot.” Basically, I presume he meant I was a young fool, who took on assignments very few in their clear mind would consider.

Then one day I found an airmail letter in my “snail”-mailbox: an official invitation by the Cuban government.

“What the hell,” I thought. Cuba? Really? The communist nemesis of the western world, a last bastion of Stalinist rule, and most certainly a nightmare for

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Why You Shouldn’t Give Your Wedding Photographer a Shot List


This post is by James Morgan from PetaPixel


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You’re pretty new to hiring professional photographers, so perhaps you feel you need to provide them with a wedding photo list in advance of your wedding. Here are 5 important reasons why you probably shouldn’t.

Do You Trust Your Photographer?

Yeah I know, start with an easy one. Assuming you’ve already booked your wedding photographer, you trust them right?

You went through a rigorous vetting process to make sure you picked the photographer who takes photos you love, and who you get along with.

That being the case, you should have no need to give any significant direction to your

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Why the Cheapest Photographer Doesn’t Always Get the Job


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


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Photographer Heather Lahtinen of the Flourish Academy recently took on one of the most common complaints among working photographers: that cheap photogs are “saturating” the market and stealing all the jobs by undercutting better photographers on price. Lahtinen says this is “the biggest load of crap” she’s ever heard.

This latest video was sparked by a comment on one of her earlier videos, in which a viewer pointed out that photographers have no problem advocating for cheap knock-offs like Godox’s V1 flash (compared to Profoto’s A1), but can’t seem to face the fact that clients will do the same

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A Tale of Two 24-70s: Nikon Z-Mount vs F-Mount Lens Comparison


This post is by Blair Bunting from PetaPixel


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First, a little backstory. For much of my young career, I shot Canon. Be it the 1D, 1D2, 1DS, 1D3, 1DS2 and 1DS3, let’s just say I had a thing for the ergonomics of that chassis. In every camera I would replace the focusing screen with the cross-style manual focusing option and would never use AF. To make things even more difficult, I only shot primes.

In the beginning the main zoom from Canon was the original EF 28-70mm f/2.8L, and if you have used one, you know the drawbacks. It was also a time when there were not

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The State of the L-Mount Alliance, One Year Later


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


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For Canon, Nikon and Panasonic, 2018-2019 was the first year where they all truly “went for it” when it comes to mirrorless. All three released full-frame mirrorless cameras, and all three seemed to have different priorities with those releases. In this three-part series, we’re looking at each of these companies in their first year and evaluate where each of them stands today in what is now a very competitive market.

Late last year we looked at both Canon’s RF mount and Nikon’s Z mount, grading each for their performance with their first full year on the market.

We’re now

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How to shoot professional editorial portraits with only one or two lights


This post is by Dunja Djudjic from DIYPhotography.net -Hacking Photography, One Picture At A Time


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You may think that a single light isn’t enough to shoot magazine-worthy and professional-looking editorial portraits. But in this video, Elaine Torres shows you how to pull it off. She demonstrates a photo shoot with a single light and a two-light setup, so you can pull it off in a small studio or even at […]

The post How to shoot professional editorial portraits with only one or two lights appeared first on DIY Photography.

The Things That Kill Themselves


This post is by Paul Melcher from PetaPixel


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The particularity of the photo industry is its death wish. At its core, everything and everyone in this industry seems hell-bent into destroying itself and, along with it, the whole industry.

Take Photo District News (PDN), for example. Long considered the monthly bible of professional photographers with its tall vertical pages, its authoritarian product reviews, and its industry-leading conference.

Nothing and no one had more influence in the photo world. If it said a lens was good, that lens was used by everyone and their mother. If your name was printed in the magazine, for whatever reason, you were somebody

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5 Pieces of Street Photography Advice You Should Ignore


This post is by Chris Page from PetaPixel


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Street photographers are not known for their reserve. We are happy to give advice on gear, framing and technique. But I believe the best photographers are those who also seek advice and look to learn from others. That said, not all advice is equal, and some ideas are outdated, narrow minded, or just plan wrong.

In this article, I am going to go question some of the advice that has almost become folklore in street photography, and pose the question: is it time to move on?

Shoot Black and White

There are good reasons for shooting in black and white.

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This is What Happens When You Zap Exposed Film with Static Electricity


This post is by Kate Miller-Wilson from PetaPixel


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Our minds are so rarely silent. For those of us with anxiety disorders, the noise is constant. From what we’ll cook for dinner to the specifics of how our lives will end, there’s no shortage of things to worry about. But how does the creative mind function amid all this static?

In my self-portrait series, Static, I explored this question by intentionally shocking 4×5 film with static electricity, creating double exposures with random patterns and shapes of light. 

The static can’t be controlled or shaped. Shocking the film means giving up creative control over the final image, knowing many

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Twitter Beefs: The Photo Industry Fights Over Photo Contests


This post is by Allen Murabayashi from PetaPixel


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Late Winter and early Spring bring another cycle of photo contest season – that time of year when many major prizes are announced (especially in the photojournalism realm). And with each year brings another round of punditry regarding the value of photo contests and an almost inevitable controversy regarding the winners.

Of course, this year is no exception.


In this week’s episode of PhotoShelter’s Vision Slightly Blurred podcast, Sarah (@sarahjake) and Allen (@allen3m) discuss the controversy around the 77th Pictures of the Year contest, as well as the Sony World Photography Awards’ decision to censor images of the Hong Kong

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Wanted: A Panoramic Photo Calculator App for My Phone


This post is by Bob Locher from PetaPixel


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I have in mind a program that would be of great assistance to anyone trying to do panoramic pictures. I am confident that someone who understands the math and how to create an app would make short work of it. That is certainly NOT me! I do know it would be quite useful for me and I would happily pay a few bucks for it in the app store. (I use Android!)

This app would offer a panoramic shooter the information for precisely pointing the camera from exposure to exposure, thus assuring uniform results. The percentage of overlap should

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