Man Ray: The Unwilling Fashion Photographer Who Excelled


This post is by Phil Mistry from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Man Ray is today regarded as one of the most innovative photographers of the twentieth century. He reinvented solarization and further developed photograms, which he called “rayographs,” in reference to himself. He also pioneered fashion photography in the 1920s-1940 in Paris but did not want to be known as a “photographer.” He considered himself a painter and artist above all.

Man Ray and Fashion is an exhibition organized by the Réunion des Musées Nationaux – Grand Palais and the City of Marseille, at Musée du Luxembourg, Paris. Man Ray is presented here in a new light as

Continue reading “Man Ray: The Unwilling Fashion Photographer Who Excelled”

Regarding Photographs: Photo Criticism — An Example


This post is by Andrew Molitor from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’ve been following along for any length of time, you might be starting to wonder if the author here even owns a camera, and if so, whether he can work it at all. I can! I really do, and I can! I mean, kinda, anyways.

This is a picture I took. Let’s talk about it.

I have proposed that, when we look at photographs, we are metaphorically there for a time. We are, metaphorically, present with this gentleman. We are, sort of, on the scene, and we react a little as if he were actually in front of us.

Continue reading “Regarding Photographs: Photo Criticism — An Example”

The Story of Analog Photographers Thriving in the Digital World


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Film photography has enjoyed a significant resurgence in the last several years despite the expansive growth of digital cameras. In this 11-minute short documentary, Exploredinary interviews a few analog photographers to see why they stick with the aged format.

The short film interviews Frank Lopez who works with tintypes, Shamsy Roomiani who works with cyanotypes, the company Photographique which handles photo restorations, and Don Puckett who works with a custom polaroid camera.

One note that perhaps is often forgotten in the digital age is the idea of not just accepting imperfections, but seeking them out. In many analog photography formats,

Continue reading “The Story of Analog Photographers Thriving in the Digital World”

The Story of Analog Photographers Thriving in the Digital World


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Film photography has enjoyed a significant resurgence in the last several years despite the expansive growth of digital cameras. In this 11-minute short documentary, Exploredinary interviews a few analog photographers to see why they stick with the aged format.

The short film interviews Frank Lopez who works with tintypes, Shamsy Roomiani who works with cyanotypes, the company Photographique which handles photo restorations, and Don Puckett who works with a custom polaroid camera.

One note that perhaps is often forgotten in the digital age is the idea of not just accepting imperfections, but seeking them out. In many analog photography formats,

Continue reading “The Story of Analog Photographers Thriving in the Digital World”

The Story of Analog Photographers Thriving in the Digital World


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Film photography has enjoyed a significant resurgence in the last several years despite the expansive growth of digital cameras. In this 11-minute short documentary, Exploredinary interviews a few analog photographers to see why they stick with the aged format.

The short film interviews Frank Lopez who works with tintypes, Shamsy Roomiani who works with cyanotypes, the company Photographique which handles photo restorations, and Don Puckett who works with a custom polaroid camera.

One note that perhaps is often forgotten in the digital age is the idea of not just accepting imperfections, but seeking them out. In many analog photography formats,

Continue reading “The Story of Analog Photographers Thriving in the Digital World”

The Story of Analog Photographers Thriving in the Digital World


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Film photography has enjoyed a significant resurgence in the last several years despite the expansive growth of digital cameras. In this 11-minute short documentary, Exploredinary interviews a few analog photographers to see why they stick with the aged format.

The short film interviews Frank Lopez who works with tintypes, Shamsy Roomiani who works with cyanotypes, the company Photographique which handles photo restorations, and Don Puckett who works with a custom polaroid camera.

One note that perhaps is often forgotten in the digital age is the idea of not just accepting imperfections, but seeking them out. In many analog photography formats,

Continue reading “The Story of Analog Photographers Thriving in the Digital World”

Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’ve ever dealt with atmospheric haze in your images, you know that it can ruin an otherwise great image. Years ago, Adobe developed the Dehaze slider to deal with it, but photographer Andrea Livieri argues it’s not the best solution in this 11-minute video.

Livieri says that the atmospheric haze he plans to address can be broken into two types: fog, and mist. It’s especially visible when you look at an image’s histogram.

“Haze removes most of the contrast from your photo, and that’s what gives it the flat, washed-out look,” he says. “There are different approaches to tackle

Continue reading “Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?”

Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’ve ever dealt with atmospheric haze in your images, you know that it can ruin an otherwise great image. Years ago, Adobe developed the Dehaze slider to deal with it, but photographer Andrea Livieri argues it’s not the best solution in this 11-minute video.

Livieri says that the atmospheric haze he plans to address can be broken into two types: fog, and mist. It’s especially visible when you look at an image’s histogram.

“Haze removes most of the contrast from your photo, and that’s what gives it the flat, washed-out look,” he says. “There are different approaches to tackle

Continue reading “Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?”

Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’ve ever dealt with atmospheric haze in your images, you know that it can ruin an otherwise great image. Years ago, Adobe developed the Dehaze slider to deal with it, but photographer Andrea Livieri argues it’s not the best solution in this 11-minute video.

Livieri says that the atmospheric haze he plans to address can be broken into two types: fog, and mist. It’s especially visible when you look at an image’s histogram.

“Haze removes most of the contrast from your photo, and that’s what gives it the flat, washed-out look,” he says. “There are different approaches to tackle

Continue reading “Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?”

Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’ve ever dealt with atmospheric haze in your images, you know that it can ruin an otherwise great image. Years ago, Adobe developed the Dehaze slider to deal with it, but photographer Andrea Livieri argues it’s not the best solution in this 11-minute video.

Livieri says that the atmospheric haze he plans to address can be broken into two types: fog, and mist. It’s especially visible when you look at an image’s histogram.

“Haze removes most of the contrast from your photo, and that’s what gives it the flat, washed-out look,” he says. “There are different approaches to tackle

Continue reading “Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?”

Use This Astro Calendar to Plan Your Milky Way Shots This Year


This post is by Dan Zafra from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Planning is key to capturing the best Milky Way images. Unlike other types of photography, shooting our galaxy requires you to consider many astronomical factors, like the sunset, the moon phase, and the Milky Way’s location in the sky.

Contrary to what many people think, the Milky Way is visible throughout the year. However, the most photogenic area, also known as the “Galactic bulge/center”, is only visible during a few specific months depending on your location.

To help you plan your Milky Way images in 2021, I’ve created a series of Milky Way Calendars where you can see, at a

Continue reading “Use This Astro Calendar to Plan Your Milky Way Shots This Year”

Regarding Photographs: Photo Criticism


This post is by Andrew Molitor from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The previous essays in this series have tried to develop some ideas about what happens when people look at photos. The realism, that mass of realistic detail, causes (I claim) a visceral reaction: we feel, we react, we think, a little as if we were transported by the photograph into the scene itself.

We find ourselves, a little, in an imagined but somehow complete world. This world is a version of reality we build from the picture itself, from what we know of the picture, from captions and other surrounding material, but also from who we are, what we know,

Continue reading “Regarding Photographs: Photo Criticism”

Regarding Photographs: Photo Criticism


This post is by Andrew Molitor from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The previous essays in this series have tried to develop some ideas about what happens when people look at photos. The realism, that mass of realistic detail, causes (I claim) a visceral reaction: we feel, we react, we think, a little as if we were transported by the photograph into the scene itself.

We find ourselves, a little, in an imagined but somehow complete world. This world is a version of reality we build from the picture itself, from what we know of the picture, from captions and other surrounding material, but also from who we are, what we know,

Continue reading “Regarding Photographs: Photo Criticism”

Regarding Photographs: Photo Criticism


This post is by Andrew Molitor from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The previous essays in this series have tried to develop some ideas about what happens when people look at photos. The realism, that mass of realistic detail, causes (I claim) a visceral reaction: we feel, we react, we think, a little as if we were transported by the photograph into the scene itself.

We find ourselves, a little, in an imagined but somehow complete world. This world is a version of reality we build from the picture itself, from what we know of the picture, from captions and other surrounding material, but also from who we are, what we know,

Continue reading “Regarding Photographs: Photo Criticism”

Is 645 Medium Format Film That Much Better Than 35mm?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Photographer Kyle McDougall says that one question he gets asked a lot is if shooting in medium format film, such as 645, is really “worth it” compared to 35mm film. In this 11-minute video, he explains why he thinks it is.

While he’s clear that there are no “bad” formats, and all are quite capable. What it really comes down to is the type of work you plan to create and the preferences that you develop over time.

“If the format you’re working with right now suits you and is working for you, don’t feel like you need to upgrade

Continue reading “Is 645 Medium Format Film That Much Better Than 35mm?”

Is 645 Medium Format Film That Much Better Than 35mm?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Photographer Kyle McDougall says that one question he gets asked a lot is if shooting in medium format film, such as 645, is really “worth it” compared to 35mm film. In this 11-minute video, he explains why he thinks it is.

While he’s clear that there are no “bad” formats, and all are quite capable. What it really comes down to is the type of work you plan to create and the preferences that you develop over time.

“If the format you’re working with right now suits you and is working for you, don’t feel like you need to upgrade

Continue reading “Is 645 Medium Format Film That Much Better Than 35mm?”

Is 645 Medium Format Film That Much Better Than 35mm?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Photographer Kyle McDougall says that one question he gets asked a lot is if shooting in medium format film, such as 645, is really “worth it” compared to 35mm film. In this 11-minute video, he explains why he thinks it is.

While he’s clear that there are no “bad” formats, and all are quite capable. What it really comes down to is the type of work you plan to create and the preferences that you develop over time.

“If the format you’re working with right now suits you and is working for you, don’t feel like you need to upgrade

Continue reading “Is 645 Medium Format Film That Much Better Than 35mm?”

Snoots Aren’t Good At Their Job, And Here’s Why


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The purpose of a snoot is to take a light source and focus it down into a more defined point, but The Beyond Photography Show host Andrew explains in this 11-minute video that the physics of snoots makes them terrible at their job.

Instead, he offers a better solution for successfully getting a more perfect defined edge to lighting.

Andrew says that snoots, by design, are terrible at their job (in fewer words). Basically, the problem is that even though snoots do initially narrow the spread of light, because they are usually positioned farther away from a subject, the light

Continue reading “Snoots Aren’t Good At Their Job, And Here’s Why”

The Process of Colorizing and Animating an 80-Year-Old Photograph


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Photo colorizer and restorer Hint of Time has shared an 8-minute video where he shows his process for not only colorizing an 80-year-old black and white photo, but also brings it to life with subtle animation.

While usually stopping at colorizations on his YouTube Channel, Hint of Time decided to go one step further with this latest work on a photo of a New Jersey farmworker taken by Mario Wolcott in 1941.

“I decided to add a little twist and not only colorize but also give this photograph a 3D effect,” he writes. “It took me about 5 hours

Continue reading “The Process of Colorizing and Animating an 80-Year-Old Photograph”

Regarding Photographs: Reading Photos I


This post is by Andrew Molitor from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This is the third essay in this series, and it begins a smaller sequence of notes running over the ways we as viewers make sense of pictures. We spend, I think, too much time thinking about what happens before and during the making of a picture, but not enough on what happens when someone actually looks at it. For most of us, for most pictures, surely this is the most interesting time?

How do we read a photo? That is, how do we make meaning from the photograph? How do we make the leap from the literal contents of

Continue reading “Regarding Photographs: Reading Photos I”