Turtle Wears GoPro, Captures Exciting Pond Life


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Kyle Naegeli, AKA The Fish Whisperer, recently strapped a GoPro camera to the back of a turtle and let it go inside a small pond. As the 4-minute video above shows, some fascinating turtle’s-eye views of the world resulted.

“In this video I strap a GoPro to a red eared slider turtle and then he walks up the bank and eats fish from my hand,” Naegeli writes. “Hope y’all enjoyed this different perspective from the turtles point of view!”

Naegeli didn’t find a random wild turtle to serve as his camera-turtle: he’s a popular social media personality who

Continue reading “Turtle Wears GoPro, Captures Exciting Pond Life”

A Group of Photographers Across the UK Passed Around One Dress


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Earlier this year, photographer Danielle Reeder of Somerset, UK, launched an experimental photo project called The Traveling Dress Collective. The idea was to pass one dress around between photographers based around the UK to see the diversity of the resulting portraits.

“What would happen if a group of photographers had the opportunity to shoot with the exact same dress?” Reeder writes. “How different would the results be?”

Reeder put together a list of photographers working in a variety of genres, from studio photographers working with posed models to lifestyle and documentary photographers who shoot in all kinds of

Continue reading “A Group of Photographers Across the UK Passed Around One Dress”

3 Ways to Use Plexiglass for Creative Portraits


This post is by Ashley Kocinski from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




As a portrait photographer, it can often be difficult to keep thing interesting in the studio. Adding a unique element to your images can help them stand out while also allowing you to have little fun. The unique element that I added for my most recent shoot was just a simple piece of plexiglass. Here are three ways you can use a sheet of plexiglass and some simple household supplies to unleash your inner creative.

#1. Foreground Bokeh

Materials

  • Plexiglass
  • Spray bottle
  • Water
  • Glycerin

This technique is an easy way to create foreground bokeh. First, mount your plexiglass in front

Continue reading “3 Ways to Use Plexiglass for Creative Portraits”

3 Ways to Boost Your Portraits Using Color


This post is by Andrew Mason from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




We photographers obsess about finding the right light. We understand how to use hard light, when to use soft light, and get excited by directional light. Portrait photographers learn how to control light using flashes and modifiers, and become experts in getting the most from natural light.

Light is an electromagnetic wave, and the frequency of that wave determines whether the light is visible or invisible to humans, and what color it is. Once you’ve mastered working with the quality and direction of light, maybe you should try experimenting with this other dimension and play with the color of light.

Continue reading “3 Ways to Boost Your Portraits Using Color”

Alter RFS: A Hinged Lens Filter Adapter That Swings Out of the Way


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Want to “turn a circular lens filter on and off” without having to screw and unscrew it from your lens? The new Alter RFS (Rapid Filter System) is a family of adapters that helps you do that. They’re touted as the “first hinged lens filter adapters.”

Instead of screwing a lens filter directly to your lens’ filter thread, you screw the RFS adapter on instead and then screw the lens filter to the adapter. Whenever your filter isn’t needed, simply swing it out and away to give your lens a filter-less view.

The adjustable-friction 270-degree hinge on the adapter

Continue reading “Alter RFS: A Hinged Lens Filter Adapter That Swings Out of the Way”

These Baby Bump Photos Use Camera Gear for Size Comparisons


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When he and his wife found out they were expecting, commercial photographer Jeremy Wilburn decided to document the pregnancy with weekly baby bump photos using camera gear for size comparisons.

“There are TONS of comparisons to fruits and vegetables, but surprisingly I couldn’t find any information on what camera or camera related accessory our child was closest in size to each week of our pregnancy,” Wilburn says. “Hopefully this series will help any of you that were curious.”

Here’s a selection of portraits of Jordan Wilburn from the series (you can find the full collection in this Facebook album

Continue reading “These Baby Bump Photos Use Camera Gear for Size Comparisons”

Perfect Imperfections: Using a Flawed Camera Lens for Creative Photos


This post is by Nick Fancher from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you were to ask a photographer whether it’s better to invest in a camera or a lens, most would answer lens. After all, no amount of megapixels or camera features can save blurry or ill-rendered images. The lens is the eye of the camera, which is why photographers spend thousands of dollars on them. However, this doesn’t mean that you need an expensive lens to make compelling images.

I, for one, am someone with a limited imagination. What I mean by that is that I need to get my images looking how I want them in camera so all

Continue reading “Perfect Imperfections: Using a Flawed Camera Lens for Creative Photos”

Arctic Photos Exhibited Inside Blocks of Melting Ice


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




During SXSW in Austin, Texas, earlier this month, award-winning Canadian documentary photographer Louie Palu held an unusual exhibition titled “Arctic Passage.” His large format photos were displayed on a plaza frozen within large blocks of ice.

Palu shot the photos in the Arctic over the course of three years while on assignment for National Geographic, and the work explores geopolitics, history, and climate change.

The photographer tells PetaPixel that he became interested in the Arctic after finishing covering a story in Afghanistan and becoming interesting in geopolitics in conflict.

“I started reading a lot about the Arctic, many people

Continue reading “Arctic Photos Exhibited Inside Blocks of Melting Ice”

The ‘Boring’ Hometown Photography Challenge


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you feel like the place you live is boring and lacking in good photo spots, try doing a “Boring Hometown Photography Challenge.” That’s what photographer Wahid Fayumzadah discusses in this 11-minute video.

“Like many other photographers and maybe people in general, you might consider your own hometown to be a little bit boring,” Fayumzadah says. “Well, so do I. I always feel like, ‘Oh, I need to go to a big city, with big buildings and a busy nightlife, to take cool cityscape pictures.’”

Fayumzadah lives in the town of Westervoort in The Netherlands, a place with

Continue reading “The ‘Boring’ Hometown Photography Challenge”

Slow-Shutter High-Speed Action Photography


This post is by Barry Mountford from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




With so many ways to be creative in photography, I get really excited with many ideas for a photograph. One area I find very interesting is sports action photography, but with a twist. It’s great to capture that split-second moment and have that frame frozen, but I wanted to explore capturing the motion and freezing the action all in one go.

The 3-minute video above is of me using this technique with some karate students.

I have used the strobe effect/repeating flash in the past during a dance shoot, which also captures the movement but freezes the movement with each

Continue reading “Slow-Shutter High-Speed Action Photography”

I Built a Kilopixel Camera That Uses a Single Photoresistor for Portraits


This post is by Niklas Roy from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I’m Niklas Roy, and I recently built a kilopixel camera called The Flying Pixel Portrait Camera. It’s a do-it-yourself project that uses a single photoresistor and a video projector in order to capture portraits.

The Flying Pixel Portrait Camera uses a video beamer, a single photoresistor, an Arduino and a PC for taking photos of people’s faces. The beamer ‘scans’ the image by projecting a small white square onto a person’s face inside an otherwise completely dark chamber.

While the projected square slowly moves over the entire face, the photoresistor captures the reflected luminosities. This generates a proportional analog

Continue reading “I Built a Kilopixel Camera That Uses a Single Photoresistor for Portraits”

Shooting Double-Exposure Photos with a Tilt-Shift Lens


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Photographer Eric Floberg made this 10-minute video showing how he creates in-camera double-exposure photos using a tilt-shift lens, a technique he calls his “creative bread and butter.”

“A lot of people do double exposures with a typical lens, but I like doing it with a tilt-shift lens because it kind of distorts reality,” Floberg says.

Here are some photos he has captured using a double-exposure and tilt-shift combination:

You can find more of Floberg’s work on his website and YouTube channel.

These Light Painting Photos Were Shot by Splashing in Water


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Light-painting photographer Denis Smith is perhaps best known for creating giant spheres of light in photos. For his latest series, titled “Liquid Light,” Smith brought his light tools into waist-deep water for beautiful photos of light bursting forth from the surface.

“For the past 2 summers I have been spending time in the water with my light painting tools,” Smith tells PetaPixel. “It has been so much fun. Light painting has always been about getting away from daily life, being super present and expressing how I am feeling through movement. With the liquid light series, I could just let loose,

Continue reading “These Light Painting Photos Were Shot by Splashing in Water”

This iPhone Slow-Mo Shot from a Car Makes the World Look Frozen


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Here’s a neat slow-motion video shot on an iPhone from inside a moving car. The birds in the sky are seemingly frozen in time, making it look like the world outside has come to a standstill.

Davi Junior of Brazil was traveling from Orlando to Miami on Florida’s Turnpike when he noticed the birds circling overhead. He pulled out his iPhone 8 and shot a clip at 1080p and 240 frames per second, and this video is what resulted.

And in case you’re wondering, the car wasn’t shattering the speed limit for the video: Junior says the driver was only

Continue reading “This iPhone Slow-Mo Shot from a Car Makes the World Look Frozen”

Night Skiing Lit by Flares on Drones


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Four years ago, Swiss freeskier and filmmaker Nicolas Vuignier had the idea of lighting a night skier using a drone. After a great deal of planning and work, this 4-minute short film titled “Heatseeker” is what resulted. It features beautiful footage of a skier hurtling down the mountainside at night under the glow of a drone-mounted flare.

“We explored various ways to achieve this effect,” Vuignier says. “It was a long and sometimes frustrating creative process marked by many cold nights.”

The film features six of the world’s best freeriders and was shot in Valais in the Swiss Alps.

Continue reading “Night Skiing Lit by Flares on Drones”

Shooting Like Bruce Gilden Is Harder Than It Looks


This post is by Keenan Hastings from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Bruce Gilden is one of the top street photographers of our generation. He’s controversial, talented and he has his own style… so there’s no question as to why some might want to emulate him.

I look at his work and I think to myself, “I could do this, I have 2 out of the 3 things he possesses.” I’m confident out on the streets, I’m not afraid to get up close and personal. His style, I also have the ability to see how he shoots, it’s pretty well documented, so I didn’t think I’d have a problem replicating

Continue reading “Shooting Like Bruce Gilden Is Harder Than It Looks”

A Multi-Plate, Multi-Lens Daguerreotype Panorama


This post is by Anton Orlov from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I’ve been experimenting non-stop with a few new daguerreotype techniques lately, and however promising the results are looking so far, those experiments are slow going. But here’s something I thought up and was able to execute in a relatively speedy manner — something I believe warrants a look. I don’t believe this method of making a panoramic image has ever been utilized before, so I’m dubbing it the “Antorama.”

The point of the antorama is to use variable focal lengths to achieve shortening or lengthening in the appearance of a scene within multiple frames of a view, in order

Continue reading “A Multi-Plate, Multi-Lens Daguerreotype Panorama”

How to Create In-Camera Effects with a Bride’s Wedding Veil


This post is by Pye Jirsa from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In this video and article, we’ll show you how you can use a bridal veil to create interesting flares and light leaks in-camera. It can be hard to get the right amount of flare in an image, especially when the sun is overpowering the frame. Here is a simple trick we like to use to block just enough sun to get the perfect shot.

Step 1: Set Up Camera On Tripod

This step is advised, but not necessary. When working with a moving object like a veil. it can be tricky to get the shot with flare by holding both

Continue reading “How to Create In-Camera Effects with a Bride’s Wedding Veil”

The Pine Cone: Nature’s Memory Card Holder and Display


This post is by Dmitri Popov from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Every year, a pine tree close to our house produces the most perfect cones, and I often pick up a handful of them on my way home. The cones are undeniably beautiful, but not of much practical use. Or so I thought, until one day it hit me that a cone would make a rather nifty SD card holder.

Besides the SD cards designated for regular use with my camera that are stored in a proper holder, I also have a bunch of cards that I use only occasionally. These cards are all over the place, and keeping tabs on

Continue reading “The Pine Cone: Nature’s Memory Card Holder and Display”

The Egg Dress: A Photo Rescue Story


This post is by Missy Mwac from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




I am starting a rescue effort. It has nothing to do with dogs, cats, or dolphins caught in tuna nets. I’m not trying to salvage old buildings nor save the environment. I still use plastic straws, people. I admit it. What I am rescuing is old photos.

I rescue them from garage sales and thrift stores. Old photos that nobody wants. It hurts my heart, that nobody wants them; that these precious portraits held no value at all and so they were given to be sold.

It hurts because these photos are of people and each of these people had

Continue reading “The Egg Dress: A Photo Rescue Story”