Personal + Career Reinvention with Jasmine Star


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Can you believe this show has been running for 10 YEARS! Today’s guest was one of my earliest guests, and long time friend, Jasmine Star. Jasmine is a photographer, business strategist and founder of Social Curator. If you’re an OG listener, you’ll hear some behind the scenes stories of some our collaborations, including the internet’s first ever LIVE wedding (where Jasmine taught CreativeLive’s first wedding photo class – attended by 150,000 students!) More important than reminiscing, though, we go deep on finding your voice, adopting children, homemade tortillas, dropping out and reinventing yourself in an entirely new career. Jasmine’s Continue reading “Personal + Career Reinvention with Jasmine Star”

iPhone Portrait Tips by Magnum Photographer Christopher Anderson


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Want to get creative with shooting portraits using just your smartphone? Apple made this 3-minute video with advice and inspiration for shooting iPhone portraits from award-winning Magnum photographer Christopher Anderson.

“Award-winning photographer and photojournalist Christopher Anderson is known for his magnetic portraiture,” Apple says. “He strives for emotive and timely elements in his compositions. In this feature, Anderson shows us how to advance beyond technical precision to disrupt the portrait.”

The video itself is in vertical orientation — it was shot on an iPhone XS and is best viewed on a smartphone screen.

In addition to noticing light and

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What Shooting Film Taught Me About Black-and-White Photos


This post is by Ellie Cotton from PetaPixel


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Clients often ask whether they can have their photos in black-and-white. My reply is always that I’ll do black-and-white versions in the gallery if they work — if they help the image shout “look at me”.

In the Darkroom

Back in 1986, when I got my first SLR, I only shot black-and-white film. I forget why. Perhaps the color was too difficult to process. But growing up, I was lucky enough to have a darkroom at home, it wasn’t equipped for anything complicated.

When I started, I photographed a lot of trees and landscapes with only the odd portrait here

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A Group of Photographers Across the UK Passed Around One Dress


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Earlier this year, photographer Danielle Reeder of Somerset, UK, launched an experimental photo project called The Traveling Dress Collective. The idea was to pass one dress around between photographers based around the UK to see the diversity of the resulting portraits.

“What would happen if a group of photographers had the opportunity to shoot with the exact same dress?” Reeder writes. “How different would the results be?”

Reeder put together a list of photographers working in a variety of genres, from studio photographers working with posed models to lifestyle and documentary photographers who shoot in all kinds of

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Shooting a Steeplechase Horse Race


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Jamey Price is a freelance motorsport photographer based in Charlotte, North Carolina, but he shoots way more than cars racing. Here’s a 6-minute video in which Price takes us behind-the-scenes of shooting a steeplechase horse race at Queen’s Cup in Charlotte.

Filmed and produced by Austin Gager, the short film is chapter 2 of Price’s FRAMES series of videos showing how he works. Chapter 1 was a look at how a motorsport photographer covers a 24-hour endurance race.

The video above explains the ins and outs of steeplechase horse race photography, a niche that Price has a deep personal

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3 Ways to Use Plexiglass for Creative Portraits


This post is by Ashley Kocinski from PetaPixel


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As a portrait photographer, it can often be difficult to keep thing interesting in the studio. Adding a unique element to your images can help them stand out while also allowing you to have little fun. The unique element that I added for my most recent shoot was just a simple piece of plexiglass. Here are three ways you can use a sheet of plexiglass and some simple household supplies to unleash your inner creative.

#1. Foreground Bokeh

Materials

  • Plexiglass
  • Spray bottle
  • Water
  • Glycerin

This technique is an easy way to create foreground bokeh. First, mount your plexiglass in front

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The Art of Lighting Porsche Racecars


This post is by Blair Bunting from PetaPixel


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Photographing a Porsche is a special experience for me, as I am a racing fan, and Porsche is racing. They are the essence of speed on the curving tracks they have graced around the world, and on a photo shoot, they are just as incredible sitting still. It is for this and many other reasons that I count myself lucky to stand behind the camera while photographing the art pieces that are Porsche racecars.

Today I wanted to show some that you may have seen before, as well as some that have not been shown until now. Each car is

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Photographer Creates Long Exposures of Himself Climbing with LED Lights


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Las Vegas-based photographer and rock climber Luke Rasmussen (AKA PhLuke) visited Looking Glass Rock outside Moab, Utah, and shot this beautiful long-exposure photo of himself climbing up and rappelling down the rock while wearing colorful LED lights.

What’s shown in the photo, titled “Through the Looking Glass,” is a 300-foot climb rated at a 5.4 difficulty and a rappel of roughly 120 feet.

The photo is a composite long-exposure image: using his 42-megapixel Sony a7R II (and Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 at f/8 and ISO 400), Rasmussen shot 17 separate 30-second RAW photos of himself during his 8.

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‘Pillars of Creation’ Photos: NASA vs. a Backyard Photographer


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Pillars of Creation is a famous photo of the Eagle Nebula captured by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Photographer Andrew McCarthy recently captured his own version of the photo from his own backyard in Sacramento, California.

The original Pillars of Creation photo was captured in 1995. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the telescope, astronomers captured a higher-resolution version of the photo using the telescope’s new Wide Field Camera 3 in 2014.

The 2014 version of “Pillars of Creation” by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.

For his version of this photo, McCarthy used a $1,350 Celestron Edge HD 800 telescope, a $1,345

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3 Ways to Boost Your Portraits Using Color


This post is by Andrew Mason from PetaPixel


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We photographers obsess about finding the right light. We understand how to use hard light, when to use soft light, and get excited by directional light. Portrait photographers learn how to control light using flashes and modifiers, and become experts in getting the most from natural light.

Light is an electromagnetic wave, and the frequency of that wave determines whether the light is visible or invisible to humans, and what color it is. Once you’ve mastered working with the quality and direction of light, maybe you should try experimenting with this other dimension and play with the color of light.

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How I Shot My Own Wildlife Short Film for Less Than $100


This post is by Lior Kestenberg from PetaPixel


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As a true fan of the wildlife documentary genre, I have been itching to create my own short wildlife video project ever since I started doing wildlife photography. That being said, and despite having some previous experience with videography and video editing, producing a high-quality wildlife video always seemed like a too difficult task for a single person with a non-existent budget and some pretty basic gear, and so I never pushed myself into trying it.

This perception changed, however, on my 30 day trip to the Andaman Islands, a tropical archipelago in the Indian Ocean. My initial goal for

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