This Online Quiz Shows How Color Can Trick You when Guessing a Photo’s Age


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Photographers know better than most: how you edit a photograph can totally chance the perception of that photo for the viewer. But a new online photo history quiz wants to make this explicit, showing how converting a photo to black-and-white can trick us into thinking a photo is much older than it really is.

The quiz was created the The Pudding and inspired by a tweet from Production Designer Hannah Beachler. On August 1st, she posted a sentiment that is almost the exact opposite of some historians, saying that people need to “stop showing Black and White pictures of the

Continue reading “This Online Quiz Shows How Color Can Trick You when Guessing a Photo’s Age”

This Online Quiz Shows How Color Can Trick You when Guessing a Photo’s Age


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Photographers know better than most: how you edit a photograph can totally chance the perception of that photo for the viewer. But a new online photo history quiz wants to make this explicit, showing how converting a photo to black-and-white can trick us into thinking a photo is much older than it really is.

The quiz was created the The Pudding and inspired by a tweet from Production Designer Hannah Beachler. On August 1st, she posted a sentiment that is almost the exact opposite of some historians, saying that people need to “stop showing Black and White pictures of the

Continue reading “This Online Quiz Shows How Color Can Trick You when Guessing a Photo’s Age”

Oddly Satisfying Recording of Classic Camera Shutter Sounds


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




We interrupt this regular news day to bring you a short, oddly satisfying recording of classic camera shutter sounds. Created by photographer Ace Noguera, he wanted to share a showcase of vintage cameras that was both visually and aurally satisfying. Thus was born The Evolution Of Camera Shutter Sounds.

“The video came from an idea I’ve had for a while, to simply showcase how shutter sounds and technology has changed over the years,” Noguera tells PetaPixel. “I thought it would be cool and entertaining to put it in a visual format and share with others how not only designs

Continue reading “Oddly Satisfying Recording of Classic Camera Shutter Sounds”

This 140-Year-Old Metal Bird is the Origin of the Phrase ‘Watch the Birdie!’


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Professional wet plate photographer Markus Hofstätter is obviously fond of historical photography processes. But his latest video doesn’t actually involve taking any photos; instead, he’s restoring a 140-year-old chirping brass bird that is thought to be the origin of the phrase “watch the birdie.”

“‘Watch the Birdie’ – thats what my parents told me, to make sure I look into the camera before they took a photo of me,” recalls Hofstätter on his blog. “I guess lots of you guys remember this saying. With the renovation of a 140-year-old historic brass birdie, I show you the origin of

Continue reading “This 140-Year-Old Metal Bird is the Origin of the Phrase ‘Watch the Birdie!’”

How Richard Nixon ‘Stole’ This Photo and Twisted It Into a Campaign Slogan


This post is by Martin Kaninsky from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




American people standing up to the Soviets! America needs Nixon! These were some of the tag lines attached to this photo during Nixon’s presidential campaign in 1960. But behind every picture, there is a story. And this is one of those photos where the story is just as good as the picture.

How many times have you heard the phrase: “truth is in the eye of the beholder”?

We’ve seen it many times in the history of photography and photojournalism. Some photographs are just not what they appear to be. Sometimes the composition is corrected later in the post, sometimes

Continue reading “How Richard Nixon ‘Stole’ This Photo and Twisted It Into a Campaign Slogan”

How Richard Nixon ‘Stole’ This Photo and Twisted It Into a Campaign Slogan


This post is by Martin Kaninsky from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




American people standing up to the Soviets! America needs Nixon! These were some of the tag lines attached to this photo during Nixon’s presidential campaign in 1960. But behind every picture, there is a story. And this is one of those photos where the story is just as good as the picture.

How many times have you heard the phrase: “truth is in the eye of the beholder”?

We’ve seen it many times in the history of photography and photojournalism. Some photographs are just not what they appear to be. Sometimes the composition is corrected later in the post, sometimes

Continue reading “How Richard Nixon ‘Stole’ This Photo and Twisted It Into a Campaign Slogan”

This Leica ‘Rifle’ is Expected to Sell for $250,000 at Leitz Photographica


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




On November 21st, the 37th Annual Leitz Photographica Auction will take place in Vienna and online. And while the full catalog hasn’t been published yet, Leica has unveiled a few “highlights” for collectors to drool over between now and the big day.

While us mere mortals can’t hope to plunk down the tens of thousands (or hundreds of thousands) of dollars required to secure the most prized “collector’s pieces and rarities” on show at Leitz Photographica next month, that doesn’t stop us from ogling the merchandise. And this year, four items in particular bear some serious ogling. They are:

How Hand-Painted Photographs Helped Introduce Japan to the World


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




When you see the term “colorized photo” you probably imagine skilled retouchers working in Photoshop, or perhaps a machine learning algorithm that does that same work automatically. But the original colorized photos were hand-painted prints made from glass plate negatives. And, as Vox explains, the best of these images came out of Japan.

In a recent episode of the Vox YouTube series ‘Darkroom,’ producer Coleman Lowndes dived into the history of hand-colored photography, and explained how meticulously painted photos helped to introduce the mysterious Empire of Japan to the world starting in the middle of the 19th century.

As the

Continue reading “How Hand-Painted Photographs Helped Introduce Japan to the World”

How Kodak is Seeking to Reinvent Itself After Failing to Adapt


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Wall Street Journal recently released a mini-doc that tells the entire story of Kodak—a story of a once-dominant company that made its name in film, and is now seeking to reinvent itself as a drug company after struggling to adapt to a future they, in fact, helped to bring about.

This short 8-minute “documentary” is unofficially titled The Rise and Fall of Kodak, and much of the story it tells will be familiar to photographers the world over.

The video starts with the origins of Kodak, explaining how George Eastman made photography accessible to the masses through the magic

Continue reading “How Kodak is Seeking to Reinvent Itself After Failing to Adapt”

How Kodak is Seeking to Reinvent Itself After Failing to Adapt


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Wall Street Journal recently released a mini-doc that tells the entire story of Kodak—a story of a once-dominant company that made its name in film, and is now seeking to reinvent itself as a drug company after struggling to adapt to a future they, in fact, helped to bring about.

This short 8-minute “documentary” is unofficially titled The Rise and Fall of Kodak, and much of the story it tells will be familiar to photographers the world over.

The video starts with the origins of Kodak, explaining how George Eastman made photography accessible to the masses through the magic

Continue reading “How Kodak is Seeking to Reinvent Itself After Failing to Adapt”

How Kodak is Seeking to Reinvent Itself After Failing to Adapt


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Wall Street Journal recently released a mini-doc that tells the entire story of Kodak—a story of a once-dominant company that made its name in film, and is now seeking to reinvent itself as a drug company after struggling to adapt to a future they, in fact, helped to bring about.

This short 8-minute “documentary” is unofficially titled The Rise and Fall of Kodak, and much of the story it tells will be familiar to photographers the world over.

The video starts with the origins of Kodak, explaining how George Eastman made photography accessible to the masses through the magic

Continue reading “How Kodak is Seeking to Reinvent Itself After Failing to Adapt”

How Kodak is Seeking to Reinvent Itself After Failing to Adapt


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Wall Street Journal recently released a mini-doc that tells the entire story of Kodak—a story of a once-dominant company that made its name in film, and is now seeking to reinvent itself as a drug company after struggling to adapt to a future they, in fact, helped to bring about.

This short 8-minute “documentary” is unofficially titled The Rise and Fall of Kodak, and much of the story it tells will be familiar to photographers the world over.

The video starts with the origins of Kodak, explaining how George Eastman made photography accessible to the masses through the magic

Continue reading “How Kodak is Seeking to Reinvent Itself After Failing to Adapt”

Russell Kirsch, Inventor of the Pixel, Passed Away This Week


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Computer scientist Russell A. Kirsch, the inventor of the pixel and an undisputed pioneer of digital imaging, passed away on Tuesday in his Portland home from complications arising from a form of Alzheimer’s disease. He was 91 years old.

Russell Kirsch may not be a name that you immediately recognize, but his contributions to computer science made digital imaging possible.

Born June 20, 1929 in New York City to immigrant parents from Russia and Hungary, Kirsch attended Bronx High School, then NYU, Harvard, and eventually MIT. In 1951, he joined the National Bureau of Standards, where he worked for

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These are the World’s First Photos of Lightning


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In the 1880s, photographer William Jennings set out to prove that lightning was a far more varied and volatile thing than a simple zig zag in the sky. After some trial and error, he ultimately succeeded, capturing what is often shared online as “the world’s first photograph of lightning.”

The story of Jennings’ achievement begins with painting. According to a 1939 article in Popular Science, the photographer set out to photograph lightning with his 4×5 plate camera because he was suspicious that “lightning bolts were not of the zig-zag form pictured by artists.”

Jennings’ first few attempts

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Take a 40-Minute Tour Through the History of Photography


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Great Britain’s Royal Institution has put together a fascinating “tour through the history of photography.” Using his own camera collection as a jumping off point, chemist Andrew Szydlo takes you through a sort of “crash course” on the history of photography in 41 minutes.

Many of our readers will already know most (if not all) of the history described and explained in this lecture, but for newbies, history buffs, or photo enthusiasts who haven’t ever dived into the subject, Sydlo covers a lot of ground in a (relatively) short time.

In the first 30 minutes, he covers:

Cambridge Uploads Powerful Archive of Photos by Jewish Doctor Exiled by Hitler


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Cambridge Digital Library recently uploaded a powerful collection of images captured by Albert Eckstein in the 1930s. Eckstein, a German Jewish doctor, was exiled by Hitler and the Nazi party in 1935 and he chose to spend his exile in Turkey helping to fight the scourge of infant mortality in the country’s poorest communities.

The newly digitized archive contains some 1,000 images captured by Eckstein during his time in Turkey, where he documented rural poverty while working hard to lower the country’s horrifying infant mortality rate of almost 50%. As the introduction on the University of Cambridge website explains:

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Taking Color Photos with Black and White Film


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Photographer Jacob Carlson has put together a photography tutorial you don’t expect to see in the year 2020. In his latest video, he’ll show you how to use the 160-year-old three color process to capture color photos using black & white film.

In case you’re not familiar, the three color process represents the origin of color photography. Pioneered by Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell, he showed that you could create a color image by combining black & white photographs taken through a red, green, and blue color filter. This is still the basis behind how we capture color today, and

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The Story of Edwin Land, and the Rise and Fall of Polaroid


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Photographer Todd Dominey recently inherited a piece of photo history from his parents: an original Polaroid SX-70. This camera sent Dominey down the rabbit hole of instant photography history, as he discovered the story behind this world-shaking camera, and the man who invented it, Edwin Land.

In the documentary-style video above, Dominey shares a bit of the passion he’s discovered with the rest of us. It’s a story of “the rise and fall of Polaroid, the SX-70, and the surprising life and career of Edwin Land.”

“Most people know Land for creating instant photography, but he’s also the inventor

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One of the World’s Oldest War Photos is Going Up for Auction in 22 Days


This post is by DL Cade from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Sotheby’s has announced the contents of its upcoming Spring photography auction, and it’s quite the lineup. The April 3rd auction will include photos by Dorothea Lange, Irving Penn, Ansel Adams, Edward Weston and a salt print by Roger Fenton that’s thought to be one of the earliest war photographs ever made.

The Spring auction will contain a whopping 230 lots that range in expected price from $2,000 all the way up to $600,000 for a photogram by László Moholy-Nagy that expertly blends typography and photography into something he called a “typophoto.”

But the star of the show, as far

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My Portrait Session with Fidel Castro


This post is by Per-Andre Hoffmann from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It was my younger years. I had just published work from the Sudanese Civil War, and the Editor-in-Chief of Germany’s GEO magazine, wrote that “Per-Andre risks life and limb for a good shot.” Basically, I presume he meant I was a young fool, who took on assignments very few in their clear mind would consider.

Then one day I found an airmail letter in my “snail”-mailbox: an official invitation by the Cuban government.

“What the hell,” I thought. Cuba? Really? The communist nemesis of the western world, a last bastion of Stalinist rule, and most certainly a nightmare for

Continue reading “My Portrait Session with Fidel Castro”