How to Find Your Photographic Style


This post is by Svenja Christina from PetaPixel


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Finding your photographic style takes time. It’s a process. You may even think you found it only to discover that your preferences have changed. That’s okay. That’s good. It means that you are growing and evolving on your journey.

I remember the first time that I thought I had found my photographic style. I was so excited! It had an airy-bright, yet film-y look. This was in my early, Lightroom-only days. It was this photo that I thought was a breakthrough:

Here are some other images from that “bright and airy” phase in my life.
I was drawn to the

Continue reading “How to Find Your Photographic Style”

How to Find Your Photographic Style


This post is by Svenja Christina from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Finding your photographic style takes time. It’s a process. You may even think you found it only to discover that your preferences have changed. That’s okay. That’s good. It means that you are growing and evolving on your journey.

I remember the first time that I thought I had found my photographic style. I was so excited! It had an airy-bright, yet film-y look. This was in my early, Lightroom-only days. It was this photo that I thought was a breakthrough:

Here are some other images from that “bright and airy” phase in my life.
I was drawn to the

Continue reading “How to Find Your Photographic Style”

10 Top Tips for Motorsport Photos by Photographer Larry Chen


This post is by Phil Mistry from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Larry Chen is a world-renowned motorsports and car culture photographer from Los Angeles. He went from a young man growing up in Santa Monica with just a passion for cars to a passion for photography, to even a paparazzi photographer before finding his niche for professional motorsports and automotive photography.

Chen, who has competed in amateur racing events, started shooting racing and cars in 2004. “I just enjoyed it so much as a hobby, I wanted to figure out a way to do it for work,” Chen tells PetaPixel.

Car culture is also a favorite of Chen. “I love

Continue reading “10 Top Tips for Motorsport Photos by Photographer Larry Chen”

A Simple Business Guide for New Photographers


This post is by Nicholas Goodden from PetaPixel


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As a professional photographer for quite a few years now, I thought some of you may be interested in some photography business advice and tips through this entry-level straightforward photography business guide.

This is a general guide since there are so many ways to define a photography business.

It’s a wide-ranging industry where entrepreneurs of all kinds have created businesses revolving around photography some way or another and not always by being actual photographers.

Some people in photography open new camera gear boxes on YouTube, others offer photography workshops, some do guided photography tours in London, some mostly sell prints,

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A Face Mask Can Double as a Flash Diffuser for Better Portraits


This post is by Ugurhan Betin from PetaPixel


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I recently found a very practical solution for diffusing a camera flash. The solution is perhaps the most practical thing available during the COVID-19 pandemic: the spare medical mask that I kept on my bag.

What’s great is that I don’t have to hold the mask in my hand. The mask’s elastic bands fit perfectly over my camera body as if it was produced for this purpose.

For a smooth and pleasing result, it is enough to fluff the fabric part a little bit after attaching the mask. It may be cheap and small, but a mask can give great

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Leading Lines in Photography


This post is by Nicholas Goodden from PetaPixel


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Leading lines in photography are existing lines within the frame of a photograph which the photographer has deliberately aligned/arranged (prior to taking the photo) by adjusting their composition either shifting their body or camera. It should result in lines which “lead” to the subject, increasing the focus of the viewer, allowing for a more enjoyable viewing experience.

Consideration of leading lines is often paired with the rule of thirds in photography, although it is not necessary.

Since I started photographing London (back around 2008), I have made a conscious effort to practice and master this as it greatly improves photographs,

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Why You Should Know the Rule of Thirds for Better Photos


This post is by Loaded Landscapes from Loaded Landscapes


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Photography is not just about having the latest or most expensive camera equipment. Good photography is all about technical skills and consistent practice. A well-known photographic composition that could make or break a photo (and the foremost concept that you will learn) is the rule of thirds.

Quick Navigation

Rule of Thirds Photography: Landscapes Explained
Rule of Thirds Photography: Portrait Explained
How to Break the Rule of Thirds

Using Rule of Thirds with an Editing Software
Rule of Thirds Examples
How to Improve Your Composition

What is the Rule of Thirds in Photography?

Shawn Ingersoll, a photographer and designer, stated

bottle with paper inside in an ocean view
Cute dog in the grass
bubbles
Couple walking in a beach

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5 Signs Your Landscape Photos Are Way Too Busy


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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Figuring out the line between “good” and “too much” is one of the big challenges in photography, whether it’s making adjustments in post-processing or figuring out what to include in a composition. In this 14-minute video, photographer Mark Denney shares 5 things to look for to figure out if your landscape photos are too busy.

“[I]n an effort to determine how I can better understand when I’ve added too much into my landscape scenes, I decided to dig into the archives of some of my past photos in search of images that I now feel are way too busy,” the

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10 Tips and Tricks to Achieve Excellent Winter Photos


This post is by JT Armstrong from PetaPixel


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Winter photography can be difficult and even dangerous if you don’t take the proper precautions to protect yourself and your gear. In this post I’ll show you how to take better snow photos and have a more enjoyable time in the cold while doing it.

1. Extra Batteries

As many of you probably already know, the cold will have a negative impact on the life and performance of your batteries. Always carry extra batteries (I recommend this on every shoot) and keep them in a warm place if possible, like a jacket pocket.

2. Keep Your Gear Dry

Nothing will

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You Can Get Rid of the Yellow Tint from Vintage Lenses with UV Light


This post is by Michael Zhang from PetaPixel


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There are certain vintage lenses out there that are prone to have glass elements that yellow over time. If you have one of these lenses, you don’t have to live with yellow-tinted results: here’s a 3-minute video in which photographer Mathieu Stern shares a simple trick for restoring the lens.

All you need to do is expose the lens elements to UV light. Stern shows how he placed a yellowed lens in a box on a mirror (to bounce the light around inside the lens) with a UV light pointed down at it. Some people also use some aluminum foil

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Mind Your Own Business: New year, new plans!


This post is by Chamira Young from Photofocus


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Welcome to Mind Your Own Business, the podcast that helps photographers improve their business and their lives! Today Skip and I have a detailed discussion about what photographers can do to make 2021 (and 2022, actually) better than ever. “Growth only happens outside your comfort zone” We discuss: The theme for 2021 is diversity in […]

The post Mind Your Own Business: New year, new plans! appeared first on Photofocus.

10 Easy Wedding Poses for Beginner Photographers


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Posing is arguably the most challenging skill photographers need to master in order to become successful professionals, and in this 10-minute video, photographer Reggie Ballesteros shows 10 poses that beginners can use in their next session.

Ballesteros says that if you’re looking to learn how to pose a bride and groom for wedding portraits on their special day, these poses and associated examples are his favorites for burgeoning photographers.

Facing Each Other

Ballesteros’s first example he calls “facing each other,” and it’s pretty much exactly how it sounds. He says that the important thing to remember about this pose is

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Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’ve ever dealt with atmospheric haze in your images, you know that it can ruin an otherwise great image. Years ago, Adobe developed the Dehaze slider to deal with it, but photographer Andrea Livieri argues it’s not the best solution in this 11-minute video.

Livieri says that the atmospheric haze he plans to address can be broken into two types: fog, and mist. It’s especially visible when you look at an image’s histogram.

“Haze removes most of the contrast from your photo, and that’s what gives it the flat, washed-out look,” he says. “There are different approaches to tackle

Continue reading “Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?”

Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’ve ever dealt with atmospheric haze in your images, you know that it can ruin an otherwise great image. Years ago, Adobe developed the Dehaze slider to deal with it, but photographer Andrea Livieri argues it’s not the best solution in this 11-minute video.

Livieri says that the atmospheric haze he plans to address can be broken into two types: fog, and mist. It’s especially visible when you look at an image’s histogram.

“Haze removes most of the contrast from your photo, and that’s what gives it the flat, washed-out look,” he says. “There are different approaches to tackle

Continue reading “Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?”

Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’ve ever dealt with atmospheric haze in your images, you know that it can ruin an otherwise great image. Years ago, Adobe developed the Dehaze slider to deal with it, but photographer Andrea Livieri argues it’s not the best solution in this 11-minute video.

Livieri says that the atmospheric haze he plans to address can be broken into two types: fog, and mist. It’s especially visible when you look at an image’s histogram.

“Haze removes most of the contrast from your photo, and that’s what gives it the flat, washed-out look,” he says. “There are different approaches to tackle

Continue reading “Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?”

Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you’ve ever dealt with atmospheric haze in your images, you know that it can ruin an otherwise great image. Years ago, Adobe developed the Dehaze slider to deal with it, but photographer Andrea Livieri argues it’s not the best solution in this 11-minute video.

Livieri says that the atmospheric haze he plans to address can be broken into two types: fog, and mist. It’s especially visible when you look at an image’s histogram.

“Haze removes most of the contrast from your photo, and that’s what gives it the flat, washed-out look,” he says. “There are different approaches to tackle

Continue reading “Is This Editing Technique Better Than the DeHaze Slider?”

Use This Astro Calendar to Plan Your Milky Way Shots This Year


This post is by Dan Zafra from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Planning is key to capturing the best Milky Way images. Unlike other types of photography, shooting our galaxy requires you to consider many astronomical factors, like the sunset, the moon phase, and the Milky Way’s location in the sky.

Contrary to what many people think, the Milky Way is visible throughout the year. However, the most photogenic area, also known as the “Galactic bulge/center”, is only visible during a few specific months depending on your location.

To help you plan your Milky Way images in 2021, I’ve created a series of Milky Way Calendars where you can see, at a

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Snoots Aren’t Good At Their Job, And Here’s Why


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The purpose of a snoot is to take a light source and focus it down into a more defined point, but The Beyond Photography Show host Andrew explains in this 11-minute video that the physics of snoots makes them terrible at their job.

Instead, he offers a better solution for successfully getting a more perfect defined edge to lighting.

Andrew says that snoots, by design, are terrible at their job (in fewer words). Basically, the problem is that even though snoots do initially narrow the spread of light, because they are usually positioned farther away from a subject, the light

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Understanding the Differences Between Clarity, Texture, and Dehaze


This post is by Jaron Schneider from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Youtuber Kevin Raposo believes that many photographers use the Clarity, Texture, and Dehaze sliders in Lightroom without fully understanding what each is doing. To help, he’s uploaded this quick 4-minute video that teaches you the differences between each, and when best to use them.

Raposo explains that the Texture Tool adds or reduces contrast in an image based on Frequency. He explains that frequency refers to the consistency of colors, brightness, and shadows in a section of an image. Low-frequency sections of an image are like skies, where there is a relative consistency of those elements. High-frequency sections of an

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How to Photograph Your Own Eye


This post is by Maximilian Simson from PetaPixel


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The world of macro photography is full of fascinating subjects, but eyes and irises have got to be among the most mesmerizing ones. As with most captivating subjects, capturing it can be quite a challenge.

In this article, I will share tips, tricks, and all the know-how you’ll need to create photographs, just like the one above, yourself.

At this point, I should mention, that the best image quality will be achieved by the use of a flash, and therefore the first challenge will be to find a willing subject/model.

In this article, I will teach you how to photograph

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